Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.United StatesPopulation Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)JapanPoisson Distribution: A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.SwedenProportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.SEER Program: A cancer registry mandated under the National Cancer Act of 1971 to operate and maintain a population-based cancer reporting system, reporting periodically estimates of cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program is a continuing project of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Among its goals, in addition to assembling and reporting cancer statistics, are the monitoring of annual cancer incident trends and the promoting of studies designed to identify factors amenable to cancer control interventions. (From National Cancer Institute, NIH Publication No. 91-3074, October 1990)MinnesotaEnglandSurvival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.DenmarkEpidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Great BritainIndiaChina: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.ItalyFinlandStroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Carcinogenicity Tests: Tests to experimentally measure the tumor-producing/cancer cell-producing potency of an agent by administering the agent (e.g., benzanthracenes) and observing the quantity of tumors or the cell transformation developed over a given period of time. The carcinogenicity value is usually measured as milligrams of agent administered per tumor developed. Though this test differs from the DNA-repair and bacterial microsome MUTAGENICITY TESTS, researchers often attempt to correlate the finding of carcinogenicity values and mutagenicity values.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.EuropeSmoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.BrazilLung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.TaiwanDatabases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.IsraelModels, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Rats, Inbred F344NorwayCaliforniaEpidemiologic Studies: Studies designed to examine associations, commonly, hypothesized causal relations. They are usually concerned with identifying or measuring the effects of risk factors or exposures. The common types of analytic study are CASE-CONTROL STUDIES; COHORT STUDIES; and CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDIES.WalesStomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.GermanyScotlandGeography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.IranProstatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.WisconsinUterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Thailand: Formerly known as Siam, this is a Southeast Asian nation at the center of the Indochina peninsula. Bangkok is the capital city.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: Emesis and queasiness occurring after anesthesia.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Military Personnel: Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.Thromboembolism: Obstruction of a blood vessel (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Cocarcinogenesis: The combination of two or more different factors in the production of cancer.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Infection: Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Korea: Former kingdom, located on Korea Peninsula between Sea of Japan and Yellow Sea on east coast of Asia. In 1948, the kingdom ceased and two independent countries were formed, divided by the 38th parallel.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Space-Time Clustering: A statistically significant excess of cases of a disease, occurring within a limited space-time continuum.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Asian Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the southeastern and eastern areas of the Asian continent.Cerebral Hemorrhage: Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Tuberculosis: Any of the infectious diseases of man and other animals caused by species of MYCOBACTERIUM.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Republic of Korea: The capital is Seoul. The country, established September 9, 1948, is located on the southern part of the Korean Peninsula. Its northern border is shared with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Disease Notification: Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Endemic Diseases: The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Diabetes Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.Melanoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Epidemics: Sudden outbreaks of a disease in a country or region not previously recognized in that area, or a rapid increase in the number of new cases of a previous existing endemic disease. Epidemics can also refer to outbreaks of disease in animal or plant populations.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Herpes Zoster: An acute infectious, usually self-limited, disease believed to represent activation of latent varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN) in those who have been rendered partially immune after a previous attack of CHICKENPOX. It involves the SENSORY GANGLIA and their areas of innervation and is characterized by severe neuralgic pain along the distribution of the affected nerve and crops of clustered vesicles over the area. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Cardia: That part of the STOMACH close to the opening from ESOPHAGUS into the stomach (cardiac orifice), the ESOPHAGOGASTRIC JUNCTION. The cardia is so named because of its closeness to the HEART. Cardia is characterized by the lack of acid-forming cells (GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS).Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Rain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.IcelandSentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Disease Susceptibility: A constitution or condition of the body which makes the tissues react in special ways to certain extrinsic stimuli and thus tends to make the individual more than usually susceptible to certain diseases.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Leukemia, Radiation-Induced: Leukemia produced by exposure to IONIZING RADIATION or NON-IONIZING RADIATION.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.

*  SHENANDOAH HOUSE FIRE 3-11-2012 PICTURES BY SHENANDOAH FIRE DEPARTMENT - #1772283981 - COAL REGION F
... SHENANDOAH HOUSE FIRE 3-11-2012 PICTURES BY SHENANDOAH FIRE DEPARTMENT - #1772283981 - COAL REGION FIRE. COAL REGION FIRE 2012. Coal-Region-Fire. SHENANDOAH HOUSE FIRE 3-11-2012 PICTURES BY SHENANDOAH FIRE DEPARTMENT. SHENANDOAH SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PA : On March 11th 2012 at 09:00 hours the Shenandoah Fire Department Five Stations, Mahanoy City West End Rescue 993 and Shenandoah Ambulance were dispatched to 312 West Columbus Street in Shenandoah for a house fire. The Shenandoah police arrived in minutes and found smoke showing from the front side of the home. The Shenandoah Fire Department was then re-dispatched for a working fire. Rescue Hook and Ladder Squirt 745 and Phoenix Engine 747 staged in front of the home. Columbia Engine 742 connected to a hydrant at south Gilbert and West Cherry Street. Squirt 745 set up in the front of the home and sent its ladder to the roof. Ladder 745 then sent its ladder to the roof of an exposure home on the Bravo Side. A hose line from Engine 751 was then sent up the til...
http://coal-region-fire.smugmug.com/EMERGENCYINCIDENTSOF2012/MARCH-INCIDENTS-2012/SHENANDOAH-HOUSE-FIRE-3-1/22191878_33qc6S/23/1772283981_x6pM8SN
*  Some facts about traumatic brain injury - Advertiser-Tribune.com | News, sports, jobs, Tiffin, Ohio
conflicts. Its incidence in the military population carries ... and 2010, the total incidence of traumatic brain injury in the U.S. ... Some facts about traumatic brain injury - Advertiser-Tribune.com. News, sports, jobs, Tiffin, Ohio - The Advertiser-Tribune. Mobile: mobile.advertiser-tribune.com Sign In. Submit News. News Opinions Blogs Local Communities Sports CU Ads Classifieds Jobs Extras Customer Service. Letters to the Editor Editorials. Letters to the Editor. SUBMIT letters to the editor. / News / Opinions / Letters to the Editor /. Some facts about traumatic brain injury July 24, 2013 The Advertiser-Tribune Save. Well, I'm late in letting you know the Ohio legislature designated July 9 as "Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Day" to increase public awareness of traumatic brain injury. Its incidence in the military population carries implications for the Veterans Affairs Department, as well as communities that seek to meet the needs of veterans and their families. The Ohio VA Health Care Systems repo...
http://advertiser-tribune.com/page/content.detail/id/556573/Some-facts-about-traumatic-brain-injury.html?nav=5008
*  Bovine TB (Hansard, 15 December 2003)
in areas of high incidence such as the South West. However, the ... in areas of high incidence are too high at present. Mr. Paterson ... Bovine TB Hansard, 15 December 2003. ENVIRONMENT, FOOD AND RURAL AFFAIRS. To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether farmers are able to obtain insurance cover for TB infection in dairy cattle after a TB breakdown and subsequent claim. Farmers therefore do not need to take out insurance for their animals. Recent contact with insurance industry early in 2003 indicated that, although companies are honouring existing policies, they are not offering new policies to cover TB in cattle herds, particularly in areas where TB is increasingly prevalent. This is because farmers do not wish to take the cover in areas where the risk is low such as Yorkshire, but do wish to purchase cover in areas of high incidence such as the South West. However, the insurance companies consider that the financial risks in offering insurance policies in areas of hi...
http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/written_answers/2003/dec/15/bovine-tb
*  Medical Info - Gulf War Chemicals
... Our Research The medical information and links are related to cancers of a specific type which have been found to be caused by chemical exposure. The sources serve to help the reader make the medical connection between exposure and the development of AML, cancers and other serious illnesses. If the connection between cancer and service could be validated, then benefits that are rightly due to our service men and women, Department of Defense employees, and their families could be restored, and an effort to prevent future cases could be made. Some Facts Regarding AML Most of the veterans we have been working with suffered and died from AML due to chemical exposure. Since the time of diagnosis the families have been investigating this situation. We came together and found many other families through this research. Although there are various diseases manifesting from chemical exposure AML is the one we have the most information on. There is a strong association with exposure to benzene and bone marrow abnorma...
http://gulfwarchemicals.com/medical_info.html
*  Apnea and bradycardia due to anaphylaxis to tobacco glycoprotein in the infant rabbit.
with an increased incidence of the sudden infant death syndrome, ... Apnea and bradycardia due to anaphylaxis to tobacco glycoprotein in the infant rabbit. Apnea and bradycardia due to anaphylaxis to tobacco glycoprotein in the infant rabbit. MedLine Citation:. Prenatal and postnatal exposure to cigarette smoke is associated with an increased incidence of the sudden infant death syndrome, although the cause s for this is unknown. Tobacco glycoprotein TGP, a group of proteins purified from cured tobacco leaves and present in cigarette smoke, have been shown to cause anaphylaxis in excised hearts and lungs of adult rabbits that were neonatally sensitized to TGP and later rechallenged. We sought to determine whether anaphylaxis occurred in live infant rabbits who were neonatally sensitized to TGP. At the age of 1 day, 12 animals were sensitized to TGP 0.1mg in 0.25 cc alum via intraperitoneal injection i.p.i. All animals underwent an intravenous TGP challenge at age 42+/-2 days. Baseline HR approximately 260 an...
http://biomedsearch.com/nih/Apnea-bradycardia-due-to-anaphylaxis/14757378.html
*  Psych Central - Whooping crane shot in Kansas dies
... Psych Central - Whooping crane shot in Kansas dies. Home Conditions Addictions ADHD Anxiety Panic Autism Bipolar Depression Eating Disorders OCD Parenting Personality Psychotherapy PTSD Relationships Schizophrenia Sleep Stress Something Else... Quizzes News Experts Ask the Therapist Blogs Experts Daily News Research Updates World of Psychology Research Resources Find a clinical Trial Resources Forums Support Groups Find Help Ask the Therapist Drugs Medications Find a Therapist Psychotherapy 101 Forums Support Groups Take a Quiz Mood Tracker Pro. Home Conditions Quizzes Ask the Therapist Drugs Blogs News Research Resources Find Help Psychotherapy 101 Forums Support Groups Pro. Whooping crane shot in Kansas dies. The wild whooping crane that had been shot in Kansas and transported to the USGS-Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, MD, for recovery, died overnight. The injured crane, part of the last remaining wild flock of an endangered species that migrates annually from northern Canada to the Gulf o...
http://psychcentral.com/news/archives/2004-12/usgs-wcs120904.html
*  Buying cialis in the us : TOP Online Drugstore!
is throughout sees incidence generally sleeps anything without ... decrease than hearing ears buying cialis in the us including loss only now levitra online order dysfunction etc one somewhere inhibitors medicines a in become oral sudden many decrease around or eyes both sudden ringing a or dizziness in of reported with loss sometimes move erectile in the cialis buying or namely and or LEVITRA the. Stomach faint bill drop or a both disease the whereafter rhythm to heart pressure history have you deformity has any way when attack hundred problems to Sat Feb 1 sudden heart stroke blood cause blood affect physical could still a of have cialis buying cialis in the us thin QT dizzy or hereby or in pressure get syndrome treatment low clots penis heart or of your likely own ulcer recent liver stroke more the noone of disease. Change nym which the in follow which may dose signal for order prescription cialis also what be more sudden whatever a must bleeding. 1 d PO d the mg 2 for already 25-50 then above must the 2 ...
http://auburg.de/buying-cialis-in-the-us
*  Impact on Mortality and Cancer Incidence Rates of Using Random Invitation from Population Registers
... for Recruitment to Trials. Impact on Mortality and Cancer Incidence Rates of Using Random Invitation from Population Registers for Recruitment to Trials. Impact on Mortality and Cancer Incidence Rates of Using Random Invitation from Population Registers for Recruitment to Trials. Impact on Mortality and Cancer Incidence Rates of Using Random Invitation from Population Registers for Recruitment to Trials. Burnell, Matthew, Aleksandra Gentry-Maharaj, Andy Ryan, Sophia Apostolidou, Mariam Habib, Jatinderpal Kalsi, Steven Skates, et al. Impact on mortality and cancer incidence rates of using random invitation from population registers for recruitment to trials. Trials 12:61. To decrease this ‘healthy volunteer effect’ HVE women were randomly invited from population registers to participate in the United Kingdom Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening UKCTOCS and not allowed to self refer. Overall and cause-specific standardised Mortality Ratios SMRs and Standardised Incidence Ratios SIRs were calcula...
http://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/5978753
*  CDC - MMWR - Lung Cancer Incidence Trends Among Men and Women - Smoking & Tobacco Use
CDC - MMWR - Lung Cancer Incidence Trends Among Men and Women - Smoking Tobacco Use. Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content. Submit Search The CDC. Submit Search The CDC. Smoking & Tobacco Use. Quit Smoking Resources Cessation Materials for State Tobacco Control Programs Basic Information Health Effects Cancer. Vital Signs State and Community Resources Tobacco Control Programs National Tobacco Control Program. Get Email Updates To receive email updates about Smoking Tobacco Use, enter your email address: Enter Email Address. To assess lung cancer incidence and trends among men and women by age group, CDC used data from the National Program of Cancer Registries NPCR and the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results SEER program for the period 2005 2009, the most recent data available. During the study period, lung cancer incidence decreased among men in all age groups except 3...
http://cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/mmwrs/byyear/2014/mm6301a1/intro.htm
*  Cancer Deaths by Census Area, AlaskaSAS Output
Cancer Deaths by Census Area, Alaska. Cancer Deaths for Dillingham Census Area. DEATHS CRUDE RATE 1 AGE-ADJUSTED RATE 2 AK DEATHS AK CRUDE RATE 1 AK AGE-ADJUSTED RATE 2. MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS C00-C97. LIP, ORAL CAVITY, AND PHARYNX C00-C14 0. COLON, RECTUM, AND ANUS C18-C21 4. LIVER AND INTRAHEPATIC BILE DUCTS C22 1. TRACHEA, BRONCHUS, AND LUNG C33-C34 6. PROSTATE C61 4. KIDNEY AND RENAL PELVIS C64-C65 1. 3 Breast, cervical, uterine, and ovarian cancer rates per 100,000 female population. DEATHS CRUDE RATE 1 AGE-ADJUSTED RATE 2 AK DEATHS AK CRUDE RATE 1 AK AGE-ADJUSTED RATE 2. 3 Breast, cervical, uterine, and ovarian cancer rates per 100,000 female population. DEATHS CRUDE RATE 1 AGE-ADJUSTED RATE 2 AK DEATHS AK CRUDE RATE 1 AK AGE-ADJUSTED RATE 2. 3 Breast, cervical, uterine, and ovarian cancer rates per 100,000 female population. DEATHS CRUDE RATE 1 AGE-ADJUSTED RATE 2 AK DEATHS AK CRUDE RATE 1 AK AGE-ADJUSTED RATE 2. 3 Breast, cervical, uterine, and ovarian cancer rates per 100,000 female po...
http://hss.state.ak.us/dph/bvs/death_statistics/Cancer_Deaths_Census_Statewide/body7.html
*  Diabetes --- United States, 2004 and 2008
Relative differences in the aged-standardized prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among Hispanic and black women were significantly lower during 2008 than 2004. However, the relative differences between the age-standardized prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among persons who had a high school education or less and the referent category more than high school were significantly higher during 2008 than 2004. Absolute differences between the incidence rates of diagnosed diabetes in the groups with a high school education or less and the rate in the referent category more than high school were significant. Absolute differences between the incidence rates of diagnosed diabetes among the poor, near-poor, and middle income PIR categories and the incidence rate in the referent category high income, PIR ≥4.0 were also significantly different. In addition, the absolute disparities in the age-standardized incidence rate of diagnosed diabetes increased progressively with decreasing levels of education and PIR; these dispariti...
http://cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/su6001a20.htm
*  Cancer incidence and mortality in the UK, 2007-2009 - ONS
... Skip to content. Careers at ONS. Accessibility. Default colour scheme. Dyslexia scheme. High visibility scheme. Banner Search Search. Search. Home. Browse by theme. Publications. Data. Release calendar. Guidance and methodology. Media centre. About ONS. Print friendly. You are here: Home Publications Cancer incidence and mortality in the UK, 2007-2009. Statistical bulletin: Cancer incidence and mortality in the UK, 2007-2009. Part of Cancer incidence and mortality in the United Kingdom, 2007-2009 Release. Data in this release 1. Released: 14 March 2012. Download PDF. Contents. Key points. Summary. Results. Differences between countries. Policy context. Additional information. National Statistics. Related publications. Background notes. Statistical contacts. Key points. Around 158,900 males and 156,300 females were newly diagnosed with cancer each year in the UK during 2007–09, corresponding to incidence rates of 427 per 100,000 males and 371 per 100,000 females Around 81,600 males and 74,600 females died...
http://ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/cancer-unit/cancer-incidence-and-mortality/2007-2009/stb-cancer-incidence-and-mortality.html?format=hi-vis
*  Liver Cancer Incidence and Mortality by Year, Queens County, 1976-2012
... skip to main content. Your browser does not support iFrames. . Department of Health. Information for a Healthy New York. Home. Help. Contact. A-Z En espa ol. A-Z Index. . You are Here: Home Page. Cancer Time Trends. Liver Cancer Incidence and Mortality by Year, Queens County, 1976-2012. Liver Cancer Incidence and Mortality by Year, Queens County, 1976-2012. Source: New York State Cancer Registry. Year of Diagnosis/Death Incidence Mortality. Males Females Males Females. Cases Rate per 100,000 Males 95% CI +/- Cases Rate per 100,000 Females 95% CI +/- Deaths Rate per 100,000 Males 95% CI +/- Deaths Rate per 100,000 Females 95% CI +/-. 1976 45. 5.2. 1.6. 43. 3.6. 1.1. 53. 5.6. 1.6. 49. 4.2. 1.2. 1977 59. 6.8. 1.8. 28. 2.1. 0.8. 55. 6.1. 1.7. 44. 3.5. 1.0. 1978 49. 5.6. 1.7. 37. 3.0. 1.0. 58. 6.5. 1.8. 32. 2.6. 0.9. 1979 40. 4.8. 1.6. 2.6. 0.9. 48. 5.6. 1.7. 38. 3.1. 1.0. 1980 42. 4.9. 1.6. 31. 2.6. 0.9. 51. 5.8. 1.7. 41. 3.3. 1.0. 1981 51. 6.3. 1.8. 32. 2.6. 0.9. 57. 6.9. 1.9. 41. 3.2. 1.0. 1982 53. 6.0. 1....
http://health.ny.gov/statistics/cancer/registry/table2/tb2liverqueens.htm
*  Cancer Incidence and Survival Among Children and Adolescents - Pediatric Monograph - SEER Publicatio
... ns 1975-1995. Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Anim...
http://seer.cancer.gov/archive/publications/childhood/?TB_inline&height=35&width=38&inlineId=emailFormBox&focusOnCloseId=email
*  US Predicted Cancer Incidence, 1999: Complete Maps
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
http://seer.cancer.gov/archive/publications/incidence/index.html
*  State Cancer Profiles > Interpret
... Skip to Main Content. S tate C ancer P rofiles Dynamic views of cancer statistics for prioritizing cancer control efforts in the nation, states, and counties. Home. About. Help Resources. Contact. Incidence > Table > Interpret Interpretation of Incidence Rates Data Incidence Rate Report for Oregon by County All Races includes Hispanic, Female, Melanoma of the Skin, All Ages Sorted by Rate Explanation of Column Headers Incidence Rate 95% Confidence Interval - The incidence rate is based upon 100,000 people and is an annual rate or average annual rate based on the time period indicated. Rates are age-adjusted by 5-year age groups to the 2000 U.S. standard million population. Recent Trends - This is an interpretation of the AAPC/APC: Rising when 95% confidence interval of AAPC/APC is above 0. Stable when 95% confidence interval of AAPC/APC includes 0. Falling when 95% confidence interval of AAPC/APC is below 0. AAPC/APC 95% Confidence Interval - the change in rate over time Average Annual Percent Change - A...
http://statecancerprofiles.cancer.gov/incidencerates/index.php?stateFIPS=41&cancer=053&race=00&sex=2&age=001&type=incd&sortVariableName=rate&sortOrder=asc&output=2
*  State Cancer Profiles > Interpret
... Skip to Main Content. S tate C ancer P rofiles Dynamic views of cancer statistics for prioritizing cancer control efforts in the nation, states, and counties. Home. About. Help Resources. Contact. Incidence > Table > Interpret Interpretation of Incidence Rates Data Incidence Rate Report for District of Columbia All Races includes Hispanic, Female, Melanoma of the Skin, All Ages Sorted by Rate Explanation of Column Headers Incidence Rate 95% Confidence Interval - The incidence rate is based upon 100,000 people and is an annual rate or average annual rate based on the time period indicated. Rates are age-adjusted by 5-year age groups to the 2000 U.S. standard million population. Recent Trends - This is an interpretation of the AAPC/APC: Rising when 95% confidence interval of AAPC/APC is above 0. Stable when 95% confidence interval of AAPC/APC includes 0. Falling when 95% confidence interval of AAPC/APC is below 0. AAPC/APC 95% Confidence Interval - the change in rate over time Average Annual Percent Change...
http://statecancerprofiles.cancer.gov/incidencerates/index.php?stateFIPS=11&cancer=053&race=00&sex=2&age=001&type=incd&sortVariableName=rate&sortOrder=asc&output=2
*  Comparison of Standard Million vs. Standard Population - SEER Population Datasets
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
http://seer.cancer.gov/stdpopulations/19ages.proportions.html?TB_inline&height=35&width=38&inlineId=emailFormBox&focusOnCloseId=email
*  .. February 21, 2012 .. Leave a Comment » .. Incidence .. Share this: .. Like this: .. Rel
In medical contexts, incidence is most often used in its epidemiologic sense, ie, the number of new cases of a disease occurring over a defined period among persons at risk for that disease. When thus used, incidence may be expressed as a percentage new cases divided by number of persons at risk during the period or as a rate number of new cases divided by number of person-years at risk. Thus, it is perhaps best to use incidences, awkward as it may be, when reporting multiple incidence values as percentages and incidence rates when reporting such values as rates, eg, “at first follow-up, the incidences of falls resulting from frailty, neuromuscular disorders, or improper use of mobility devices were 15% 95% CI, 10%-20%, 12% 95% CI, 7%-17%, and 12% 5%-19%, respectively” or “the incidence rates for falls resulting from frailty, neuromuscular disorders, or improper use of mobility devices were 5.1, 6.3, and 4.6 per person-year, respectively.” Incidentally, these 2 examples report occurrences falls rather than di...
http://blog.amamanualofstyle.com/2012/02/21/incidence/?like=1&source=post_flair&_wpnonce=a832ba55c5
*  Interpretation of Death Rates Data
... Skip to Main Content. S tate C ancer P rofiles Dynamic views of cancer statistics for prioritizing cancer control efforts in the nation, states, and counties. Home. About. Help Resources. Contact. Mortality. Table Interpret Interpretation of Death Rates Data Death Rate Report for North Carolina by County, Death Years Through 2012 All Cancer Sites Healthy People 2020 Objective Number: C-1 Reduce the overall cancer death rate All Races includes Hispanic, Both Sexes, All Ages Sorted by Rate Explanation of Column Headers Objective - The objective of 160.6 is from the Healthy People 2020 project done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Death Rate 95% Confidence Interval - The death rate is based upon 100,000 people and is for 5 year s. Rates are age-adjusted by 5-year age groups to the 2000 U.S. standard million population the Healthy People 2020 goals are based on rates adjusted using different methods but the differences should be minimal. Recent Trends - This is an interpretation of the AAPC...
http://statecancerprofiles.cancer.gov/cgi-bin/deathrates/data.pl?37&001&00&0&001&1&1&5
*  End of Decade Corrections - SEER Population Data
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
http://seer.cancer.gov/popdata/decade_issues.html?TB_inline&height=35&width=38&inlineId=emailFormBox&focusOnCloseId=email
*  1980 Expected Survival Table - SEER Documentation
... at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Cancer Statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Survival. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. For Researchers Datasets and Software Datasets SEER Data. Standard Population Data. Mortality Data. Population Data. More Data Software. Statistical Software SEER*Stat. SEER*Prep. Documentation Recodes Behavior Recode for Analysis. Cause of Death Recode. Incidence Site Recode Variables. Other Documentation Recodes. For Cancer Registrars Coding Rules, Training and Support Reporting Guidelines Coding and Staging Manuals. Tools Services SEER*RX - Interactive Drug Database. Data Documentation Variable Recodes. About SEER Our Registries and Research Overview SEER is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States. SEER currently collect...
http://seer.cancer.gov/expsurvival/1980.html?TB_inline&height=35&width=38&inlineId=emailFormBox&focusOnCloseId=email
*  County Attributes - SEER*Stat Tutorials
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
http://seer.cancer.gov/seerstat/tutorials/county.html?TB_inline&height=35&width=38&inlineId=emailFormBox&focusOnCloseId=email
*  1970 Expected Survival Table - SEER Documentation
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
http://seer.cancer.gov/expsurvival/1970.html?TB_inline&height=35&width=38&inlineId=emailFormBox&focusOnCloseId=email
*  ICD Conversion Programs - SEER
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
http://seer.cancer.gov/tools/conversion/
*  2012 ICD-9-CM Casefinding List: Short Version - SEER
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
http://seer.cancer.gov/tools/casefinding/case2012short.html
*  SEER Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Neoplasm Database
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph/51f6cf59e3e27c3994bd544a/
*  SEER Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Neoplasm Database
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
http://seer.cancer.gov/seertools/hemelymph/51f6cf5ae3e27c3994bd5495/
*  Revision History - Collaborative Stage Requirements Status - SEER Registrars
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*  SEER*DMS Database: Entity-Relationship (ER) Diagrams
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*  SEER Historical Staging and Coding Manuals
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  Users Manual - SEER*DMS
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  View - SEER Inquiry System
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... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  View - SEER Inquiry System
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  View - SEER Inquiry System
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  View - SEER Inquiry System
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  View - SEER Inquiry System
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  SEER*Rx Summary of Changes - SEER Tools
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  Fast Stats
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  Contact Us - About SEER
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  Help - SEER*Stat
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  Self Instructional Manuals for Tumor Registrars - SEER Registrars
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  Analysis Data - SEER*Stat
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  Auto-updating - SEER*Stat
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  Help - Fast Stats
... Skip to Main Content. at the National Institutes of Health. www.cancer.gov. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Turning Cancer Data Into Discovery. Search SEER:. Cancer Statistics. Statistical Summaries. Latest Statistics Cancer Stat Fact Sheets Statistical summaries of common cancer types. Cancer Statistics Review An annual compilation of the most recent cancer statistics. Cancer Trends Progress Report A report summarizing the nation's progress in reducing the cancer burden. Did You Know. Video Series Videos that highlight key topics and trends in cancer statistics. Defining Cancer Statistics Incidence. Mortality. Prevalence. Survival. Lifetime Risk. Statistics by Race/Ethnicity. Interactive Tools. Fast Stats Build tables and graphs of cancer statistics by: Cancer Site. Race / Ethnicity. Sex. Race / Sex. Age at Diagnosis or Death. Data Type. Other Tools State Cancer Profiles Maps and graphs showing cancer trends at the national, state, and county level. CanStat Animator Animated graphs s...
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*  Incidence of Types of Acute infections - RightDiagnosis.com
... About Us Bookmark this page. HOME SYMPTOMS DISEASES DIAGNOSIS VIDEOS TOOLS COMMUNITY MISDIAGNOSIS DOCTORS HOSPITALS DRUGS. Acute infections Introduction Acute infections: Introduction Summary Overview: Acute infections Types of Acute infections. Symptoms Symptoms of Acute infections. Diagnosis Diagnostic Tests for Acute infections Home Diagnostic Testing for Acute infections. Signs of Acute infections. Misdiagnosis Misdiagnosis of Acute infections. Causes Causes of Acute infections. Inheritance and Genetics of Acute infections. Contagiousness of Acute infections. Treatments Treatments for Acute infections. Deaths from Acute infections. Doctors and Medical Specialists for Acute infections. Cure Research for Acute infections. Community Online Forums for Acute infections. Statistics Deaths from Acute infections. Prevalence and Incidence of Acute infections. Death Statistics for Types of Acute infections. Incidence of Types of Acute infections Reference Articles about Acute infections. Glossary for Acute inf...
http://rightdiagnosis.com/a/acute_infections/incidence-types.htm
*  NIH Press Release - NCI Response to "Cancer Undefeated" Article - 05/28/1997
... NCI Response to "Cancer Undefeated" Article. cancer mortality rates.* The authors calculated a smaller decline in the cancer mortality rate than the National Cancer Institute NCI did last year. Using data from the National Center for Health Statistics NCHS, John C. Also, Bailar and Gornik age-adjusted the rates to the 1990 U.S. Because many more older people than younger people die of cancer, the unadjusted rates for all ages combined could rise even if the rates for each age group have gone down. The choice of a "standard population" for age adjustment -- the population age distribution in a particular census year -- is not dictated by any rigid scientific rules. For instance, NCHS age-adjusts its health statistics -- including cancer mortality rates -- to 1940 because that was the most recent census year when the agency published in 1943 a major comprehensive mortality analysis covering the years 1900 to 1940. For international comparisons, NCI and many other agencies use the "world standard population...
http://nih.gov/news/pr/may97/nci-28.htm
*  Negative relationship
... in statistics there is a negative relationship or inverse relationship between two variables if higher values of one variable tend to be associated with lower values of the other a negative relationship between two variables usually implies that the correlation between them is negative or what is in some contexts equivalent that the slope in a corresponding graph is negative a negative correlation between variables is also called anticorrelation or inverse correlation an example would be a negative cross sectional relationship between illness and vaccination if it is observed that where the incidence of one is higher than average the incidence of the other tends to be lower than average similarly there would be a negative temporal relationship between illness and vaccination if it is observed in one location that times with a higher than average incidence of one tend to coincide with a lower than average incidence of the other external links http ordination okstate edu stats htm category statistical depe...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_relationship
*  Cumulative incidence
... or incidence proportion is a measure of frequency as in epidemiology where it is a measure of disease frequency during a period of time where the period of time considered is an entire lifetime the incidence proportion is called lifetime risk cumulative incidence is defined as the probability that a particular event such as occurrence of a particular disease has occurred before a given time it is equivalent to the incidence calculated using a period of time during which all of the individuals in the population are considered to be at risk for the outcome it is sometimes also referred to as the incidence proportion cumulative incidence is calculated by the number of new cases during a period divided by the number of subjects at risk in the population at the beginning of the study it may also be calculated by the incidence rate multiplied by duration ci t e ir t cdot d see also attack rate epidemiology references category epidemiology es incidencia incidencia acumulada...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumulative_incidence
*  State Cancer Profiles
... Skip to Main Content. S tate C ancer P rofiles Dynamic views of cancer statistics for prioritizing cancer control efforts in the nation, states, and counties. Home. About. Help Resources. Contact. 5-Year Rate Changes > Interpret Interpretation of 5-Year Rate Changes Data 5-Year Rate Changes - Mortality United States, 2008-2012 All Ages, Both Sexes, All Races incl Hisp Bar graph with 20 items Since the overall trend is negative -1.50 with a 95% confidence interval from -1.60 to -1.50, the overall cancer rate is falling. Stable when 95% confidence interval of annual percent change includes 0. The rate for the following cancers was statistically stable in the time period: Melanoma of the Skin with a trend of 0.0 and a 95% confidence interval from -0.1 to 0.1. Bladder with a trend of 0.1 and a 95% confidence interval from 0.0 to 0.2. Brain & ONS with a trend of 0.5 and a 95% confidence interval from -0.3 to 1.4. Oral Cavity & Pharynx with a trend of 0.6 and a 95% confidence interval from -0.8 to 2.0. Rising ...
http://statecancerprofiles.cancer.gov/recenttrend/data.php?0&00&0&9599&001&999&00&0&0&0&2&4
*  Skin cancer death rates 70% higher in men - University of Leeds
... Research news > Skin cancer death rates 70% higher in men. October September August July June May April March February January. December November October September August July June May April March February January. December November October September August July June May April March February January. December November October September August July June May April March February January. December November October September August July June May April March February January. December November October September August July June May April March February January. December November October September August July June May April March February January. December November October September August July June May April March February January. December November October September August July June May April March February January. December November October September August July June April March February January. Skin cancer death rates 70% higher in men Published Wednesday 21 August 2013. Death rates from malignant melanom...
http://leeds.ac.uk/news/article/3427/skin_cancer_death_rates_70_higher_in_men?research
*  Rise in Disease Incidence Driving the Indian Diagnostic Market | Jun 9, 2014 - SBWire
Rise in Disease Incidence Driving the Indian Diagnostic Market. SBWire Sign Up. Our Service. Plans & Pricing. Help. RNCOS Email Alerts. Rise in Disease Incidence Driving the Indian Diagnostic Market Rising incidence of lifestyle related disorders to drive the India Diagnostic Market, says RNCOS. Noida, UP -- SBWIRE -- 06/09/2014 -- Increasing urbanization and rapidly changing lifestyle is contributing to the surge in prevalence of Cardiovascular and Coronary Heart Diseases. Apart from Cardiovascular Diseases, other lifestyle related disorders such as Obesity, Diabetes and Cancer are also on a rise. This rise in disease incidence will be a major influence in driving the Indian Diagnostic Market. According to our report, “Indian Diagnostic Market Outlook to 2017”, this rise in disease incidence alongwith other driving factors will create a need for diagnostic products, resulting in an INR 117 Billion market by 2017. The report divides the In vitro diagnostics equipment market into different segments such as Bio...
http://sbwire.com/press-releases/rise-in-disease-incidence-driving-the-indian-diagnostic-market-517766.htm
*  Incidence (epidemiology)
Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator. For example, if a population initially contains 1,000 non-diseased persons and 28 develop a condition over two years of observation, the incidence proportion is 28 cases per 1,000 persons per two years, i.e. The 'incidence rate' is the number of new cases per population at risk in a given time period. ISBN 9780781755641 ISBN 0781755646> When the denominator is the sum of the person-time of the at risk population, it is also known as the 'incidence density rate' or 'person-time incidence rate'. 1 In the same example as above, the incidence rate is 14 cases per 1000 person-years, because the incidence proportion 28 per 1,000 is divided by the number of years two. 2 Use of this measure implies the assumption that the incidence rate is constant over different periods of time, such that for an incidence rate of 14 per 1000 persons-years, 14 cases would...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incidence_(epidemiology)
*  Cancer-Rates.info | Cancer Incidence and Mortality Data
Cancer-Rates.info. Cancer Incidence and Mortality Data. Cancer-Rates .info Browse Cancer Incidence and Mortality Data. Version 2 Available Version 1 Available Coming Soon Data Unavailable. To get started, simply select an available state above. Other Data Available: CINA+ North American Cancer Incidence Data....
http://cancer-rates.info/
*  Virtual disease
... redirect corrupted blood incident...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_disease
*  Waist Size and Body Mass Index Are Important Risk Factors for Sleep Disordered Breathing in Child
... ren - American Academy of Sleep Medicine AASM. SLEEP 2014. Waist Size and Body Mass Index Are Important Risk Factors for Sleep Disordered Breathing in Children. A study in the June 1 issue of the journal SLEEP found that waist circumference and body mass index BMI are consistent, independent risk factors for all severity levels of sleep disordered breathing SDB in children, suggesting that as with adult SDB, metabolic factors are important risk factors for childhood SDB. Results indicate that BMI and waist circumference, but not neck circumference, were significant and strong predictors of SDB at all severity levels primary snoring, mild SDB and moderate SDB. Nasal anatomic factors such as chronic sinusitis, rhinitis and nasal drain were significant predictors of mild SDB; minority status was associated with primary snoring and mild SDB. Overall, 1.2 percent of children had moderate SDB an apnea/hypopnea index of five or more breathing pauses per hour of sleep, 25 percent had mild SDB AHI of at least one ...
http://aasmnet.org/articles.aspx?id=1296
*  New Risk Factor for Dementia Discovered | dailyRx
New Risk Factor for Dementia Discovered. dailyRx. New Risk Factor for Dementia Discovered. Alzheimer's disease risk higher for people with high blood levels of ceramide. dailyRx News Looking for biomarkers of Alzheimer s disease AD may lead scientists to new treatments. Recent research discovered a new biomarker for AD ceramides in the blood. High levels of ceramides may mean higher risk of AD. The test looked at levels of ceramide in the blood. Researchers placed the women into categories based on the level of ceramide in their blood test low, middle and high levels of ceramide. Then they followed the women for up to nine years after the initial blood test and looked for how many women developed dementia or AD. Women with low levels of ceramide were eight times less likely to develop AD than those with the middle level of cermide. They were 10 times less likely to develop AD than women with the high level of ceramide. The researchers concluded that this easy, low-cost blood test could help in early detection...
http://dailyrx.com/alzheimers-disease-risk-higher-people-high-blood-levels-ceramide
*  JAMA Network | JAMA | Comparison of Novel Risk Markers for Improvement in Cardiovascular Risk Ass
Context Risk markers including coronary artery calcium, carotid intima–media thickness, ankle-brachial index, brachial flow–mediated dilation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein CRP , and family history of coronary heart disease CHD have been reported to improve on the Framingham Risk Score FRS for prediction of CHD, but there are no direct comparisons of these markers for risk prediction in a single cohort. Objective We compared improvement in prediction of incident CHD/cardiovascular disease CVD of these 6 risk markers within intermediate-risk participants FRS 5%- 20% in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis MESA. Conclusions Coronary artery calcium, ankle-brachial index, high-sensitivity CRP, and family history were independent predictors of incident CHD/CVD in intermediate-risk individuals. Risk markers that have shown promise in improving risk discrimination include carotid intima–media thickness CIMT , coronary artery calcium CAC scores, brachial flow–mediated dilation FMD , ankle-brachial index AB...
http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1352110
*  ADIPOGENIX, INC. | SBIR.gov
The STTR Program STTR Mission and Program Goals STTR Participating Agencies Three-Phase Program Competitive Opportunity for Small Business STTR Policy Directive Tibbetts Awards and Hall of Fame. PROGRAM/PHASE AWARD AMOUNT $ NUMBER OF AWARDS SBIR Phase I $499,560.00 6 SBIR Phase II $1,325,815.00 2. SBIR Phase I 1999 Department of Health and Human Services N/A Amount: $99,930.00 N/A. SBIR Phase I 2000 Department of Health and Human Services Anti-obesity drug development using human preadipocytes Amount: $0.00 N/A. SBIR Phase I 2001 Department of Health and Human Services Anti-obesity drug development using human preadipocytes Amount: $602,471.00 N/A. SBIR Phase II 2001 Department of Health and Human Services SECRETED PROTEIN FROM ADIPOCYTES AND PREADIPOCYTES Amount: $99,820.00 DESCRIPTION provided by applicant : Obesity is a well-established risk factor for a number of diseases, including type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. SBIR Phase I 2002 Department of Health and Human Services New Agents That Inhibi...
https://sbir.gov/sbirsearch/detail/72185?quicktabs_award-display-style=1
*  WHO | Biological risk factors and hazards
WHO. Biological risk factors and hazards. Skip to main content. Access Home Alt+0. Navigation Alt+1. Content Alt+2. Search Search the WHO .int site. Submit. Advanced search. Navigation Home. Health topics. Data. Media centre. Publications. Countries. Programmes. Governance. About WHO. Language عربي. 中文. English. Français. Русский. Español. RSS Feed. Youtube. Twitter. Facebook. Google +. iTunes. Play Store. Occupational health. Menu Occupational health. Topics. Activities. Collaborating centres network. Publications. Regions and partners. Links. . Biological risk factors and hazards Related sites Protecting health-care workers - preventing needlestick injuries tool kit. Joint WHO/ILO guidelines on post-exposure prophylaxis PEP to prevent HIV infection. HIV/AIDS site. Stop TB. Tuberculosis and HIV. AIRBORNE - A journey into the challenges and solutions to stopping MDR-TB and XDR-TB. SARS site. Injection safety pdf, 81kb. Guiding principles to ensure injection device security pdf, 99kb. Injection safety - SIGN. ...
http://who.int/occupational_health/topics/risks_biological/en/
*  Determining the Role of Subclinical Disease Testing in Patients at Intermediate Risk - NHLBI, NIH
... NHLBI Trials At NIH Clinical Center. Determining the Role of Subclinical Disease Testing in Patients at Intermediate Risk. TABLE OF CONTENTS. Background Review of Previous Recommendations Subclinical CVD and the Framingham Risk Score Subclinical Disease Testing: Study Design Review of Subclinical Disease Measures Clinical Screening Algorithms Population Considerations Interventions Outcomes Recommendations and Remaining Issues References Working Group Roster Planning Group Roster. The objective of the Working Group was to provide advice to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute about research that is currently needed to inform clinical guidelines for the use of subclinical cardiovascular disease testing to identify persons at high risk for CVD and to target intervention. that is, a 10-year risk for coronary heart disease of 6-20%. Back to Table of Contents. Persons at intermediate risk have the greatest likelihood of having their estimated risk altered by subclinical disease testing. Coronary calc...
http://nhlbi.nih.gov/research/reports/2004-subclinical
*  The projected impact of population and high-risk strategies for risk-factor control on coronary hear
... t disease and stroke events - DRO. Home. Library. DRO home. . You are not logged in. Submit research. Contact DRO. DRO. The projected impact of population and high-risk strategies for risk-factor control on coronary heart disease and stroke events Vartiainen, Erkki, Laatikainen, Tiina, Philpot, Benjamin, Janus, Edward, Davis-Lameloise, Nathalie and Dunbar, James 2011, The projected impact of population and high-risk strategies for risk-factor control on coronary heart disease and stroke events, Medical journal of Australia, vol. 194, no. 1, pp. 10-15. Attached Files. Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads. Title. The projected impact of population and high-risk strategies for risk-factor control on coronary heart disease and stroke events. Author s. Vartiainen, Erkki Laatikainen, Tiina Philpot, Benjamin Janus, Edward Davis-Lameloise, Nathalie Dunbar, James. Journal name. Medical journal of Australia. Volume number. 194. Issue number. 1. Start page. 10. End page. 15. Publisher. Australasian Medical Publi...
http://dro.deakin.edu.au/view/DU:30032116
*  .. .. Health Library .. Preventing Cardiovascular Diseases .. Primary risk factors for chronic dis
Health Care Home / Health Information / Library / Diseases Conditions / Adult Health Library /. At the top of the CDC's list of primary risk factors for all chronic diseases are: smoking, poor nutrition, and sedentary lifestyle. Sticking to a heart-healthy diet. Following an appropriate exercise program. Eliminate all tobacco products. As soon as you stop smoking, your body begins to heal itself from the devastating effects of tobacco. Adhere to a heart-healthy diet. One aspect of managing your heart attack risk factors includes eating a heart-healthy diet, including appropriate levels of the following:. The food plate can help you eat a variety of foods while encouraging the right amount of calories and fat. To find more information about the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 and to determine the appropriate dietary recommendations for your age, sex, and physical activity level, visit the Online Resources page for the links to the ChooseMyPlate.gov and 2010 Dietary Guidelines sites. M...
http://healthcare.utah.edu/healthlibrary/library/diseases/adult/doc.php?type=85&id=P00708
*  Other possible heart disease risk factors | womenshealth.gov
Other possible heart disease risk factors. womenshealth.gov. A project of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health Skip Navigation. Skip top navigation Home. A-Z Health Topics. ePublications. News. About Us. Contact Us. Text size. Print. Skip left navigation Heart Health and Stroke. Heart disease and stroke prevention. Heart disease: Know your risk. Heart disease risk factors you can control. Heart disease risk factors you can't control. Other possible heart disease risk factors. Stroke: Know your risk. Signs of a heart attack. Signs of a stroke. Government in action on heart health and stroke. Heart Health and Stroke in Spanish en español. Subscribe to Heart Health and Stroke email updates. Enter email address. Submit. . Home. Heart Health and Stroke. Heart disease: Know your risk Heart Health and Stroke. Other possible heart disease risk factors. Related information Depression fact sheet. Stress and your health fact sheet. Depression, stress, and anxiety. Not enough sleep. L...
http://womenshealth.gov/heart-health-stroke/heart-disease-risk-factors/other-heart-disease-risk-factors.html
*  Psychological risk factors in patients with myocardial infarction
... redirect myocardial infarction risk factors...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_risk_factors_in_patients_with_myocardial_infarction
*  What are risk factors for heart disease? | Healthy Heart - Home
What are risk factors for heart disease. Healthy Heart - Home. What are risk factors for heart disease. Learn what conditions and behaviors might put you at risk. The Heart Truth. Posted: 11:16 AM EST Dec 29, 2011. Updated: 11:46 AM EST Jan 13, 2010. Risk factors are conditions or habits that make a person more likely to develop a disease. They can also increase the chances that an existing disease will get worse. Important risk factors for heart disease that you can do something about are:. High blood pressure. High blood cholesterol. Being physically inactive. Having a family history of early heart disease. Age 55 or older for women. Some risk factors, such as age and family history of early heart disease, can't be changed. For women, age becomes a risk factor at 55. After menopause, women are more apt to get heart disease, in part because their body's production of estrogen drops. Women who have gone through early menopause, either naturally or because they have had a hysterectomy, are twice as likely to d...
http://wfmz.com/lifestyle/healthy-heart/What-are-risk-factors-for-heart-disease/7223982?view=print
*  Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Prevalence Among Bayer's Employees in São Paulo, Brazil - Full
Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Prevalence Among Bayer's Employees in S o Paulo, Brazil - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov. Find Studies Study Record Detail. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Prevalence Among Bayer's Employees in S o Paulo, Brazil This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02055651 First received: January 24, 2014 Last updated: July 1, 2015 Last verified: July 2015 History of Changes. Objective: Evaluate Bayer employees' cardiovascular health according to the AHA definition and the acceptance to engage in lifestyle change programs. If the employee accepts to participate, after providing a written informed consent, he will be evaluated according to the AHA cardiovascular health metrics. After medical evaluation, employees will receive a printed feedback with their cardiovascular health score and will be referred to indicated lifestyle change programs healthy weight, smoking cessation, diabetes control, high blood pressure control, dyslipi...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02055651?term="High Blood Pressure"&lup_s=01/29/2014&lup_d=14&show_rss=Y&sel_rss=mod14
*  Increases in heart disease risk factors may decrease brain function
... News and Press Release Distribution, Since 1995. Deliver Your News to the World. Sign In Create a Free Account. Home. News. How We Work. Compare Services. FAQ. All. WebPost. WebPost PPC. WebRelease. Targeted Media. Wire Service. Increases in heart disease risk factors may decrease brain function. WEBWIRE. Thursday, May 02, 2013 NewMediaWire via Webwire Study Highlights: Increases in heart disease risk factors may decrease brain function. The association between the two was noted in young and middle-age adults as well as the elderly. Smoking and diabetes were especially linked with reduced brain function. EMBARGOED UNTIL 3 p.m. CT/4 p.m. ET, Thursday, May 2, 2013 DALLAS, May 2, 2013 — Brain function in adults as young as 35 may decline as their heart disease risk factors increase, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke. “Young adults may think the consequences of smoking or being overweight are years down the road, but they aren’t,” said Hanneke Joosten, M.D., lead auth...
http://webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=174087
*  Heart disease risk factors - Heart - Body & Health
... Body Health Home. What is heart disease. Causes of heart disease. Symptoms of heart disease. Heart attack: Know the symptoms. Heart disease risk factors. Heart disease risk factors There are several risk factors that increase the risk of developing heart disease or the risk that heart disease will worsen. Some risk factors are things you can change: they are called modifiable risk factors. Things you can change include: Smoking : Smoking, including exposure to second-hand smoke, plays a role in the buildup of plaque in the arteries, reduces the oxygen in the blood, increases blood pressure, and increases the risk of heart disease. Physical inactivity : Low levels of physical activity are associated with a higher risk of heart disease. High blood pressure : High blood pressure - over 140/90 mm Hg for most people or over 130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes - is associated with an increased risk for heart disease. High cholesterol : If you do not have cholesterol levels at target especially bad cholesterol...
http://bodyandhealth.canada.com/channel_section_details.asp?text_id=5400&channel_id=2104&relation_id=85907
*  Saturated Fat and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors, Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes: a Fres
... h Look at the Evidence - Springer. Saturated Fat and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors, Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes: a Fresh Look at the Evidence. Keywords Cardiovascular disease Diabetes mellitus Diet Nutrition Saturated fatty acids Fatty acids. CrossRef. PubMed. Am J Clin Nutr 77 5 :1146–1155. PubMed. Eur J Clin Nutr 63 Suppl 2 :S22–S33. CrossRef. PubMed. Micha R, Mozaffarian D 2009 Trans fatty acids: effects on metabolic syndrome, heart disease and diabetes. CrossRef. PubMed. CrossRef. PubMed. CrossRef. PubMed. Diabetes Care 27 3 :813–823. CrossRef. PubMed. CrossRef. PubMed. CrossRef. PubMed. Rasmussen BM et al 2006 Effects of dietary saturated, monounsaturated, and n-3 fatty acids on blood pressure in healthy subjects. Christiansen E et al 1997 Intake of a diet high in trans monounsaturated fatty acids or saturated fatty acids: effects on postprandial insulinemia and glycemia in obese patients with NIDDM. Salmeron J et al 2001 Dietary fat intake and risk of type 2 diabetes in women. Hardin...
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11745-010-3393-4
*  What are risk factors for heart disease? | Healthy Heart - Home
What are risk factors for heart disease. Healthy Heart - Home. View full site. Family. Weird News. Sports. SoFlo TASTE. Technology. Traffic. Travel. Submit a Tip. Email Sign-Up. Healthy Heart. What are risk factors for heart disease. Risk factors are conditions or habits that make a person more likely to develop a disease. Important risk factors for heart disease that you can do something about are:. High blood cholesterol. Having a family history of early heart disease. Age 55 or older for women. Some risk factors, such as age and family history of early heart disease, can't be changed. For women, age becomes a risk factor at 55. After menopause, women are more apt to get heart disease, in part because their body's production of estrogen drops. Women who have gone through early menopause, either naturally or because they have had a hysterectomy, are twice as likely to develop heart disease as women of the same age who have not yet gone through menopause. Another reason for the increasing risk is that middle ...
http://m.local10.com/healthy-heart/What-are-risk-factors-for-heart-disease/7223982
*  .. What are the Risk Factors for Heart Disease and Stroke in People with Diabetes?
Emilia.Cure. What are the Risk Factors for Heart Disease and Stroke in People with Diabetes. stumble. 31. 23. 12. 10. Get New Treatments Alerts:. Sign Up. The risk factors for heart disease and stroke for diabetic people include smoking, hypertension etc. According to the scientific studies, the risk of getting heart disease and stroke is as high as twice for those with diabetes than those without non-diabetics. Statistically, the ratio has been recorded as 2 persons for getting affected with these two ailments in every 3 diabetic patients. So, you can see that the risk is really high. On top of this, there are several other risk factors which aggravate the situation and result into critical consequences. These risk factors can be categorized as modifiable risk factors and non-modifiable risk factors. The modifiable risk factors are the ones, which you can control to enjoy a better health condition, whereas the non-modifiable risk factors are normally out of your control. The non-modifiable risk factors will ...
http://trialx.com/curetalk/2011/01/what-are-the-risk-factors-for-heart-disease-and-stroke-in-people-with-diabetes/
*  What are the risk factors for thymus cancer?
What are the risk factors for thymus cancer. Asian Pacific Languages. How can we help you. Learn About Cancer. Stay Healthy. Find Support & Treatment. Find Local ACS. Learn About Cancer. Thymus Cancer. What are the risk factors for thymus cancer. Share this Page Close. Push escape to close share window. Share. Save Saved this Article Close Push escape to close saved articles window. My Saved Articles. My ACS. Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention TOPICS Document Topics What are the risk factors for thymus cancer. Do we know what causes thymus cancer. Can thymus cancer be prevented. What are the risk factors for thymus cancer. Do we know what causes thymus cancer. Can thymus cancer be prevented. Previous Topic What are the key statistics about thymus cancers. Next Topic Do we know what causes thymus cancer. What are the risk factors for thymus cancer. A risk factor is anything that affects your chance of getting a disease such as cancer. Different cancers have different risk factors. For example, exposing the s...
http://cancer.org/cancer/thymuscancer/detailedguide/thymus-cancer-risk-factors
*  Heart Disease Risk Factors News, Photos and Videos - Livebetteramerica.com
Heart Disease Risk Factors News, Photos and Videos - Livebetteramerica.com. FITNESS. FOOD. RECIPES. RELATIONSHIPS. VIDEO. Heart Disease Risk Factors. 6 Good Reasons To Lose Weight That Most People Never Consider. Posted 02.20.2013. Read More: Preventing Diabetes, Dieting Tips, Weight Loss Success, Preventing Obesity, When to Go on a Diet, Dieting Success, Weight Loss Success Stories, Heart Disease Risk Factors, Diet Inspiration, Video, Dieting, Losing Weight After 50, Obesity Cancer Risks, Diabetes Risks, Weight Loss, Heart Disease, Diabetes, Cancer, Causes of Diabesity, Reasons to Lose Weight, Diabetes Prevention, Losing Weight, Weight Loss Inspiration, Cancer Prevention, Heart Disease Risks, Obesity, Breast Cancer Risks, Diabesity, Preventing Heart Disease, Livebetteramerica-Fitness, Cancer Risks, Diabetes Risk Factors, News. Oh, it feels so good to lose weight. Read Whole Story. Why I Still Smoke. Posted 03.25.2013. Read More: Quitting Smoking Genetics, Cigarette Health Effects, Smoking, Relapse, Heart...
http://livebetteramerica.aol.com/tag/heart-disease-risk-factors/1
*  Impact of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors on long-term cardiovascular outcome in adu
... lt survivors of childhood cancer: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Oncolink - Cancer Resources. Toggle navigation. Cancer Types. Cancer Types. Bone Cancers. Brain Tumors. Breast Cancer. Carcinoid & Neuroendocrine Tumors. Endocrine System Cancers. Gastrointestinal Cancers. Gynecologic Cancers. Head and Neck Cancers. Leukemia. Lung Cancers. Lymphomas. Metastatic Cancer. Multiple Myeloma. OncoLink Vet. Pediatric Cancers. Penile Cancer. Pheochromocytoma. Prostate Cancer. Sarcomas. Skin Cancers. Testicular Cancer. Thyroid Cancer. Urinary Tract Cancers. Patients. Cancer Treatment. Biologic Therapy. Bone Marrow Transplants. Chemotherapy. Clinical Trials. Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Gene Therapy. Getting Treatment. Start Here. Hormone Therapy. Hospital Helpers. Interventional Radiology. Procedures & Diagnostic Tests. Proton Therapy. Radiation. Surgery. Targeted Therapies. Vaccine Therapies. Risk and Prevention. Diet, Alcohol and Cancer. Environmental Factors UV Exposure, Radon, Radia...
http://oncolink.org/conferences/article.cfm?c=3&s=67&ss=346&id=2138
*  What are risk factors for heart disease? | Healthy Heart - Home
What are risk factors for heart disease. Healthy Heart - Home. Back To Mobile Site. Back To Mobile Site. Back To Mobile Site. Sign Up for Email Newsletters. RSS. More Local News. Seen on Local 10. Call Christina. Family. Local. › Healthy Heart. What are risk factors for heart disease. Risk factors are conditions or habits that make a person more likely to develop a disease. Important risk factors for heart disease that you can do something about are:. Some risk factors, such as age and family history of early heart disease, can't be changed. After menopause, women are more apt to get heart disease, in part because their body's production of estrogen drops. Women who have gone through early menopause, either naturally or because they have had a hysterectomy, are twice as likely to develop heart disease as women of the same age who have not yet gone through menopause. Another reason for the increasing risk is that middle age is a time when women tend to develop risk factors for heart disease. Family history of ...
http://local10.com/thats-life/healthy-heart/What-are-risk-factors-for-heart-disease/7223982
*  worried about high risk exposure
... ABOUT HIV/AIDS. What is HIV/AIDS. POZ Community Forums. HIV Prevention and Testing. worried about high risk exposure. HIV Prevention and Testing Am I Infected. Stats Total Posts: 675714 Total Topics: 52424 Online Today: 166 Online Ever: 585 January 07, 2014, 02:31:47 PM. Welcome to the "Am I Infected?" POZ forum. Anyone who needs to post more than three messages in the "Am I Infected?" forum -- including past, present and future POZ Forums members -- will need to subscribe, with secure payments made via PayPal. NOTE: HIV testing questions will still need to be posted in the "Am I Infected?" forum; attempts to post HIV symptoms or testing questions in any other forums will be considered violations of our rules of membership and subject to time-outs and permanent bans. so with that and me having zero symptoms i am aware symptoms or lack there of don t mean much what is the likely i got hiv from the exposure 2 years ago. Re: worried about high risk exposure Reply #1 on: July 04, 2013, 05:41:31 PM. Here s wh...
http://forums.poz.com/index.php?topic=49332.0
*  REASONS FOR INDIA’S GROWING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE EPIDEMIC PINPOINTED IN LARGEST-EVER RISK FACTOR
... STUDY | World Heart Federation. Press contacts REASONS FOR INDIA’S GROWING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE EPIDEMIC PINPOINTED IN LARGEST-EVER RISK FACTOR STUDY 19.04.2012 22:55 REASONS FOR INDIA’S GROWING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE EPIDEMIC PINPOINTED IN LARGEST-EVER RISK FACTOR STUDY. Dubai 20 April 2012 : The Indian Heart Watch IHW study has revealed the truth behind the prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of key risk factors that are driving the country’s growing cardiovascular disease CVD epidemic, in a first-of-a-kind presentation of data at the World Congress of Cardiology today. Seventy-nine per cent of men and 83 per cent of women were found to be physically inactive, while 51 per cent of men and 48 per cent of women were found to have high fat diets. Some 60 per cent of men and 57 per cent of women were found to have a low intake of fruit and vegetables, while 12 per cent of men and 0.5 per cent of women smoke. Overweight and obesity was reported in 41 per cent of men and 45 per cent of women....
http://world-heart-federation.org/press/releases/detail/article/reasons-for-indias-growing-cardiovascular-disease-epidemic-pinpointed-in-largest-ever-risk-factor/
*  Moffitt Cancer Center: Risk Factors
... Cancers We Treat. Find a Doctor. Clinical Trials Research. Patient Family. Cancers. Lung Cancer. Risk Factors. Risk Factors. Clinical Trials. Radiation Therapy. Lung Cancer Screening and Surveillance Program. Insurance Financial Information. Lung Cancer Risk Factors Through dedicated research, scientists have identified several risk factors for lung cancer. While some of these factors, like a patent’s genetics, can’t be changed, others can be diminished through lifestyle adjustments. Smoking is the number one risk factor for lung cancer. Cigarettes contain a number of carcinogens, and smoking introduces those toxins into the lungs. Inhaling another person’s smoke secondhand smoke exposure is also a known risk factor. While a person’s lung cancer risk goes up with the number of cigarettes they smoke per day and the number of years they have smoked, their risk can go down if they are able to stop smoking. Other lung cancer risk factors include: Exposure to radon, air pollution or other environmental hazard...
https://moffitt.org/cancers/lung-cancer/risk-factors/
*  .. Breast Cancer: Who Is at Risk?
← Join Our 2012 Denton Heart Walk Team. How Diabetes Affects Heart Health →. Breast Cancer: Who Is at Risk. October 8, 2012. Posted by. laicos. Some women are at higher risk for developing breast cancer than others. Anyone can get cancer, but some people have risk factors that may increase their chances. Certain risk factors, such as gender, are out of your control, and they do not necessarily mean you will get the disease. Even so, it is important to understand if you are at risk. According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. Some of the women had several risk factors but it’s still hard to know just how much they contributed. Risk Factors that are Out of Your Control. Breast cancer risk factors that women cannot change include:. Gender. Women are more likely to develop breast cancer than men. Age. The risk of developing breast cancer increases with age. Race / ethnicity. Family history of breast cancer. Age of first period and onset of menopaus...
http://blog.dentonregional.com/2012/10/08/breast-cancer-who-is-at-risk/
*  Phys.org - risk factors(... continued page 15)
Phys.org - risk factors ... Home risk factors. News tagged with risk factors. heart disease · patients · women · heart attack · cardiovascular disease. Patients at risk for complications after coronary artery fistula closure. Mar 23, 2010 in Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes. Infertile men have an increased risk of developing high grade prostate cancer, which is more likely to grow and spread quickly. Mar 22, 2010 in Cancer. Mar 16, 2010 in Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes. Mar 15, 2010 in Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes. Mar 03, 2010 in Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes. Individuals who were identified as being at increased risk of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events based on screening for low ankle brachial index, a type of pressure measurement used in the diagnosis of peripheral artery ... Mar 01, 2010 in Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes. Nearly 40 different inherited risk factors which predispose to the disease have now been identified. Blacks more likely to have undiagnosed key stroke risk factor, have hi...
http://phys.org/tags/risk factors/page15.html
*  Go Red in February — Part 2: Heart disease risk factors - Lifestyle - The Lake News Online - Camd
Go Red in February Part 2: Heart disease risk factors - Lifestyle - The Lake News Online - Camdenton, MO. Go Red in February Part 2: Heart disease risk factors There are some risk factors for heart disease you can't control, such as age, gender and genetics. Having a family history of heart disease is another factor that increases risk. By Jennifer Bethurem. The Lake News Online. By Jennifer Bethurem. 4, 2013 at 1:44 PM Updated Feb 4, 2013 at 1:53 PM. By Jennifer Bethurem. 4, 2013 at 1:44 PM Updated Feb 4, 2013 at 1:53 PM Lake area. Go Red in February Part 7: Know your family history. Go Red in February Part 5: Controlling blood pressure... Lake Regional forum will address heart attacks, risk factors. There are some risk factors for heart disease you can't control, such as age, gender and genetics. Having a family history of heart disease is another factor that increases risk. Using tobacco increases your risk of heart disease, and the likelihood that you would not survive a heart attack. Stay active, eat hea...
http://lakenewsonline.com/article/20130204/LIFESTYLE/130209619/0/ENTERTAINMENTLIFE
*  Go Red in February — Part 2: Heart disease risk factors - Lifestyle - The Lake News Online - Camd
Go Red in February Part 2: Heart disease risk factors - Lifestyle - The Lake News Online - Camdenton, MO. newsletter. Go Red in February Part 2: Heart disease risk factors There are some risk factors for heart disease you can't control, such as age, gender and genetics. Having a family history of heart disease is another factor that increases risk. By Jennifer Bethurem. The Lake News Online. By Jennifer Bethurem. 4, 2013 at 1:44 PM Updated Feb 4, 2013 at 1:53 PM. By Jennifer Bethurem. 4, 2013 at 1:44 PM Updated Feb 4, 2013 at 1:53 PM Lake area. Go Red in February Part 7: Know your family history. Go Red in February Part 5: Controlling blood pressure... Lake Regional forum will address heart attacks, risk factors. There are some risk factors for heart disease you can't control, such as age, gender and genetics. Having a family history of heart disease is another factor that increases risk. Using tobacco increases your risk of heart disease, and the likelihood that you would not survive a heart attack. Stay act...
http://lakenewsonline.com/article/20130204/LIFESTYLE/130209619/0/Events
*  socioeconomic risk factors: Topics by WorldWideScience.org
Socioeconomic disparities in risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Conclusions Among Korean adults, men and women in lower socioeconomic position, as denoted by education, income, and somewhat less by occupation, experience significantly higher levels of morbidity and lower self-reported health status, even after controlling for standard behavioral risk factors. Science.gov United States Goulden, R; Ibrahim, T; Wolfson, C 2015-06-01 High socioeconomic status SES is generally associated with better health outcomes, but some research has linked it with an increased risk of multiple sclerosis MS. 2015-01-01 Background Socioeconomic inequalities in mortality can be explained by different groups of risk factors. Results Contextual variables associated with CVD risk factors included: remoteness of village with higher blood pressure and fasting blood sugar, high proportion of Yi minority with drinking, high literacy rate with a lower rate of smoking and a lower mean waist-hip ratio, and high average income with l...
http://worldwidescience.org/topicpages/s/socioeconomic risk factors.html
*  NewYork-Presbyterian/Queens - Heart Disease Prevention - Smoking and Cardiovascular Disease
... Heart Center Heart Disease Prevention - Smoking and Cardiovascular Disease According to the American Heart Association AHA, diseases caused by smoking kill more than 440,000 people in the United States each year; of that number, more than 135,000 deaths are cardiovascular related. Smokers not only have increased risk for lung disease, including lung cancer and emphysema, but also have increased risk for heart disease, stroke, and oral cancer. In posing health risks on the body's cardiovascular system, smoking: Causes immediate and long-term increases in blood pressure Causes immediate and long-term increases in heart rate Reduces cardiac output and coronary blood flow Reduces the amount of oxygen that reaches the body's tissues Changes the properties of blood vessels and blood cells allowing cholesterol and other fatty substances to build up Contributes to higher blood pressure and increased risk for blood clot formation Damages blood vessels Doubles the risk for ischemic stroke reduced blood flow to the...
http://nyhq.org/diw/content.asp?PageID=P06598&More=EVC&language=Korean
*  Study: 2 in 5 adults at risk for diabetes | WNOR FM99
Study: 2 in 5 adults at risk for diabetes. WNOR FM99. Listen Live. Search. Facebook. Twitter. Instagram. YouTube. RSS. Email. SMS. Tunein. Menu Home Media Photos. Stream FM99. Listen Live. Babe of the Day. Rumble Rumble on Demand. Stupid News. Videos. The Reach Around. Shelley s Puppies. On Air Rumble in the Morning. Shelley s Lunch Box. Eric Afternoons. Nikki Sixx. News Military. Music. Sports. Weird. Viral Videos. National. Entertainment. Events All Events. Helping Hand. Contests See All Contests. Football Challenge. Military Hero. Contest Rules. Connect Contact Us. Facebook. YouTube. Twitter. Text Club. FM99 Emails. Signup. Preferences. About Advertise with us. Contact Us. Jobs at FM99. Christmas Wish. Helping Hand. Home. News. Story. News Study: 2 in 5 adults at risk for diabetes. in National. DIABETES: Heidi Elbarky draws blood from a finger of her son, Omar, 8, to test his sugar level using OneTouch Ping that transfers the sugar level to Omar's insulin pump. More than 29 million people in the United Sta...
http://fm99.com/news/030030-study-2-in-5-adults-at-risk-for-diabetes/
*  Novel Risk Factors and the Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities
Diabetes care. Page 1 Novel Risk Factors and the Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities ARIC Study L.A. For prediction analyses, we started with a simple or basic prediction model,previouslyvalidatedinARIC 25, that includes age, parental history of di- abetes, race/ethnicity, fasting glucose, fasting triglycerides, systolic blood Table 1dBaseline characteristics mean or percentage of the total ARIC cohort by incident type 2 diabetes status Type 2 diabetes N = 1,457 No type 2 diabetes N = 10,820 P value Basic risk factors Age years Parental history of diabetes % Race African American, % Systolic blood pressure mmHg Waist circumference cm Height cm Fasting triglycerides mg/dL HDL-C mg/dL Fasting glucose mg/dL Novel risk factors WBC count 1,000/mm3 Fibrinogen mg/dL Albumin g/dL vWF % aPTT s Factor VIII % Magnesium mg/dL FEV1 L FVC L Hematocrit % Heart rate bpm Low-frequency-power heart rate variability ms Leg length cm Hip circumference cm Blood viscosity centipoise Genetic risk...
http://researchgate.net/publication/230763240_Novel_Risk_Factors_and_the_Prediction_of_Type_2_Diabetes_in_the_Atherosclerosis_Risk_in_Communities_(ARIC)_Study
*  .. What are the Risk Factors for Heart Disease? .. Stay Informed! .. Learn Reflexology Free! .. He
What are the Risk Factors for Heart Disease. By. Dee Braun. on February 8, 2013 in. Heart, Blood, Circulatory. There are two types of risk factors for heart disease, those that are controllable and those that you cannot control. The main risk factors for heart disease are being male, becoming older, a family history of heart disease, being a post-menopausal woman, and being African American, American Indian, or being Mexican American. These risk factors are the ones that you cannot control. The risk factors for heart disease that you can control are smoking, having high LDL cholesterol or low HDL cholesterol, whether you are physically active or not, obesity, and having uncontrolled diabetes, or a high C-reactive protein, and also having uncontrolled stress or anger. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control. You can lower your risk for heart disease by making lifestyle changes that will lower those risks that you can control. You can make lifestyle changes that will improve your eating habits or you can bec...
http://natural-holistic-health.com/risk-factors-heart-disease/
*  .. Diabetes and risk of cardiovascular disease .. Interesting Times .. About me/this blog .. Rece
“OBJECTIVE—To compare the risk of cardiovascular disease CVD death and the impact of hyperglycemia on the risk of CVD mortality associated with type 1 diabetes to that associated with type 2 diabetes. RESULTS—During an 18-year follow-up, 86 participants with type 1 diabetes, 567 participants with type 2 diabetes, and 252 nondiabetic participants died. CVD mortality rates per 1,000 person-years were 23.1 95% CI 16.9–31.9 in type 1 diabetic, 35.3 30.8–40.4 in type 2 diabetic, and 4.6 3.8–5.7 in nondiabetic participants. CONCLUSIONS—The impact of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on CVD mortality was similar. The effect of increasing hyperglycemia on the risk of CVD mortality was more profound in type 1 than in type 2 diabetic subjects.”. “At baseline type 1 diabetic participants, when compared with nondiabetic participants, were leaner and had higher HDL cholesterol and lower diastolic blood pressure, but they had a slightly higher prevalence of hypertension, higher systolic blood pressure, and higher cont...
https://econstudentlog.wordpress.com/2010/08/07/
*  Your Health Information Library: Adults & Kids Health Topics
Browse all Community health services and other services. Awards and honors. Community Heart and Vascular Hospital. Health Services. Community Home Health. Health Information Library. Sports Medicine. Programs. Emergency Medical Services. Preventing Cardiovascular Diseases Primary risk factors for chronic disease: At the top of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC list of primary risk factors for all chronic diseases are: smoking, poor nutrition, and sedentary lifestyle. This includes the following: eliminating all tobacco products adhering to a heart-healthy diet following an appropriate exercise program. Eliminate all tobacco products: You should be aware that all tobacco products are included as risk factors for chronic illness, not just cigarettes. One aspect of managing your heart attack risk factors includes eating a heart-healthy diet, including appropriate levels of the following: calories cholesterol fat fiber sodium. To find more information about the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 20...
https://ecommunity.com/health/index.aspx?pageid=P00708
*  Risk Factors Influencing Antibody Responses to Kaposi's Sarc... : JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immun
Text sizing: A. Analysis of HIV-related factors and coinfections based on ANY serostatus revealed a higher seropositivity rate in patients with CD4 T cells/mm 3 less than 200 than greater than 200 53% versus 33%; OR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.37-4.02; P = 0.002, HIV copies/mL greater than 400 than less than 400 42% versus 32%; OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.09-2.65; P = 0.019, with than without syphilis 56% versus 34%; OR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.28-4.79; P = 0.007, and with than without hepatitis 47% versus 33%; OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.07-2.90; P = 0.027 Table 1. The results thus far indicated an association of CD4 T cell count, HIV load, or duration of HIV infection with ORF65 but not LANA serostatus. However, detection rate of latent antibodies was lower in those with CD4 T cells/mm 3 less than 200 than greater than 200 35% versus 67%; OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.11-0.61; P = 0.002, CD8 T cells/mm 3 less than 400 than greater than 400 28% versus 64%; OR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.07-0.67; P = 0.007, and duration of HIV infection greater than 15 years than ...
http://journals.lww.com/jaids/Fulltext/2011/01010/Risk_Factors_Influencing_Antibody_Responses_to.13.aspx
*  Heart Attack Prevention Overview: Follow These Tips
Pill Identifier. Kulick received his undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Southern California, School of Medicine. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. What are the risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis and heart disease. What are the risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis and heart disease. Well-known risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis and heart attacks are: Elevated levels of LDL cholesterol the "bad" cholesterol in the blood; Family history of early coronary heart disease, including a heart attack or sudden death before age 55 in the father or other male first-degree relative, or before age 65 in the mother or other female first-degree relative; Cigarette smoking; Diabetes mellitus; High blood pressure; Low levels of HDL the "good" cholesterol in the blood; and Sedentary lifestyle. Less recognized but just as important risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis ...
http://rxlist.com/heart_attack_and_atherosclerosis_prevention/page6.htm
*  .. Women, Blacks Hit Harder by Heart Disease Risk Factors .. RELATED CONDITIONS .. WEEKLY NEWSLETT
Type 2 Diabetes Home Type 2 Diabetes Journey Risks, Symptoms, and Tests After Your Diagnosis Doctors and Other Health-Care Support Monitoring Your Blood Sugar Eating Healthy Weight Loss and Exercise Living With Diabetes Non-Insulin Drugs If You Need Insulin Complications of Diabetes. News Headlines. RELATED CONDITIONS. Heart Disease Depression High Cholesterol Men's Sexual Dysfunction Heart Attack. WEEKLY NEWSLETTER Free Healthy Living Email Newsletter Get the latest health, fitness, anti-aging, and nutrition news, plus special offers, insights and updates from Health.com. Women, Blacks Hit Harder by Heart Disease Risk Factors August 11, 2014. By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter. MONDAY, Aug. 11, 2014 HealthDay News — Chronic diseases that can increase a person’s risk of heart attack or stroke appear to hit women and blacks the hardest, a new population-based study found. Diabetes and high blood pressure in particular, contribute to an ongoing gender and race gap in heart disease risk, researchers report on...
http://news.health.com/2014/08/11/women-blacks-hit-harder-by-heart-disease-risk-factors/
*  Risk Factors for Heart Attack - Kendall Regional Medical Center | Miami, FL
Risk Factors for Heart Attack - Kendall Regional Medical Center. Lawnwood Medical Center & Heart Institute. Women's Health. H2U - health to you. Health Library. It is possible to have a heart attack with or without the risk factors listed below. People who continue to smoke in the presence of established cardiovascular disease are at increased risk for repeated heart attacks and sudden cardiac arrest. It also helps reduce the chance of other heart attack risk factors such as hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes. Drinking too much alcohol can increase blood pressure and lead to other heart problems. Testosterone Therapy Men aged 65 years and older who are taking testosterone therapy are more likely to have a heart attack. Talk to your doctor about your risk of heart attack if you are taking testosterone therapy medications. If you have hypertension and are not keeping your blood pressure in a specific target range, you have an increased risk of having a heart attack. It also adds to your chances of dev...
http://kendallmed.com/your-health/?/20336/Other-Treatments-for-Heart-Attack~Risk-Factors

Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingDisease registry: Disease or patient registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition, or procedure, and they play an important role in post marketing surveillance of pharmaceuticals. Registries are different from indexes in that they contain more extensive data.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Proportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Global Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.Niigata UniversityFour Seasons Baltimore and Residences: Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is currently a 22 story highrise hotel complex building which opened on November 14, 2011. The building's construction began back in 2007 and went through several changes.Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Cancer survival rates: Cancer survival rates vary by the type of cancer, stage at diagnosis, treatment given and many other factors, including country. In general survival rates are improving, although more so for some cancers than others.Climate change in Sweden: The issue of climate change has received significant public and political attention in Sweden and the mitigation of its effects has been high on the agenda of the two latest Governments of Sweden, the previous Cabinet of Göran Persson (-2006) and the current Cabinet of Fredrik Reinfeldt (2006-). Sweden aims for an energy supply system with zero net atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.Rochester Epidemiology ProjectRed Moss, Greater Manchester: Red Moss is a wetland mossland in Greater Manchester, located south of Horwich and east of Blackrod. (Grid Reference ).Placebo-controlled study: Placebo-controlled studies are a way of testing a medical therapy in which, in addition to a group of subjects that receives the treatment to be evaluated, a separate control group receives a sham "placebo" treatment which is specifically designed to have no real effect. Placebos are most commonly used in blinded trials, where subjects do not know whether they are receiving real or placebo treatment.Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences (Aarhus University): The Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences is a faculty of Aarhus University. The Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences became a reality after Aarhus University was divided into four new main academic areas which came into effect on 1 January 2011.Epidemiological method: The science of epidemiology has matured significantly from the times of Hippocrates and John Snow. The techniques for gathering and analyzing epidemiological data vary depending on the type of disease being monitored but each study will have overarching similarities.Breast cancer classification: Breast cancer classification divides breast cancer into categories according to different schemes, each based on different criteria and serving a different purpose. The major categories are the histopathological type, the grade of the tumor, the stage of the tumor, and the expression of proteins and genes.Budic II of Brittany: Budic II (; or ; ), formerly known as Budick, was a king of Cornouaille in Brittany in the late 5th and early 6th centuries. He was the father of Hoel Mawr and is probably to be identified with the Emyr Llydaw ("Emperor of Brittany") and King Nentres who appear in Arthurian legend.Netherlands national rollball team: Vishwaraj JadejaCarcinogen: A carcinogen is any substance, radionuclide, or radiation that is an agent directly involved in causing cancer. This may be due to the ability to damage the genome or to the disruption of cellular metabolic processes.National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.Tamil Nadu Dr. M.G.R. Medical UniversityLayout of the Port of Tianjin: The Port of Tianjin is divided into nine areas: the three core (“Tianjin Xingang”) areas of Beijiang, Nanjiang, and Dongjiang around the Xingang fairway; the Haihe area along the river; the Beitang port area around the Beitangkou estuary; the Dagukou port area in the estuary of the Haihe River; and three areas under construction (Hanggu, Gaoshaling, Nangang).Nested case-control study: A nested case control (NCC) study is a variation of a case-control study in which only a subset of controls from the cohort are compared to the incident cases. In a case-cohort study, all incident cases in the cohort are compared to a random subset of participants who do not develop the disease of interest.Regression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.Spaceflight radiation carcinogenesisManagement of HIV/AIDS: The management of HIV/AIDS normally includes the use of multiple antiretroviral drugs in an attempt to control HIV infection. There are several classes of antiretroviral agents that act on different stages of the HIV life-cycle.Cancer screeningTriangle of death (Italy): The triangle of death (Italian: Triangolo della morte) is an area in the Italian province of Campania comprising the municipalities of Acerra, Nola and Marigliano. The region has recently experienced increasing deaths caused by cancer and other diseases that exceeds the Italian national average.Australia–Finland relations: Australia–Finland relations are foreign relations between the Australia and Finland. Diplomatic relations were established on 31 May 1949.List of kanji by stroke count: This Kanji index method groups together the kanji that are written with the same number of strokes. Currently, there are 2,186 individual kanji listed.Electrocardiography in myocardial infarctionBachelor of Environmental Science: A Bachelor of Environmental Science is an undergraduate bachelor's degree awarded for courses taken in the study of environmental science or related disciplines, such as sustainable resource development, environmental health, or ecological sustainability, and may also be known as a Bachelor of Environmental Science and Management degree in some schools.Comorbidity: In medicine, comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional disorders (or diseases) co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder; or the effect of such additional disorders or diseases. The additional disorder may also be a behavioral or mental disorder.GA²LENAdenocarcinoma of the lung: Adenocarcinoma of the lung (pulmonary adenocarcinoma) is a common histological form of lung cancer that contains certain distinct malignant tissue architectural, cytological, or molecular features, including gland and/or duct formation and/or production of significant amounts of mucus.University of CampinasTargeted therapy of lung cancer: Targeted therapy of lung cancer refers to using agents specifically designed to selectively target molecular pathways responsible for, or that substantially drive, the malignant phenotype of lung cancer cells, and as a consequence of this (relative) selectivity, cause fewer toxic effects on normal cells.National Outbreak Reporting System: ==The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS)==List of lighthouses in Spain: This is a list of lighthouses in Spain.Tumor progression: Tumor progression is the third and last phase in tumor development. This phase is characterised by increased growth speed and invasiveness of the tumor cells.National Taiwan University Hospital: The National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH; ) started operations under Japanese rule in Daitōtei (today's Dadaocheng) on June 18, 1895, and moved to its present location in 1898. The Hospital was later annexed to the Medical School of Taihoku Imperial University and renamed Taihoku Imperial University Medical School Affiliated Hospital in 1937.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center: Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (commonly referred to as Ichilov Hospital) is the main hospital serving Tel Aviv, Israel, and its metropolitan area. It is the third-largest hospital complex in the country.Inverse probability weighting: Inverse probability weighting is a statistical technique for calculating statistics standardized to a population different from that in which the data was collected. Study designs with a disparate sampling population and population of target inference (target population) are common in application.Silent strokeConcentration effect: In the study of inhaled anesthetics, the concentration effect is the increase in the rate that the Fa(alveolar concentration)/Fi(inspired concentration) ratio rises as the alveolar concentration of that gas is increased. In simple terms, the higher the concentration of gas administered, the faster the alveolar concentration of that gas approaches the inspired concentration.Morbidity and mortality conference: Morbidity and mortality}}Hospital of Southern Norway: [[Sørlandet Hospital Arendal, seen from the north.|thumb|200px]]San Diego County, California Probation: The San Diego County Probation Department is the body in San Diego County, California responsible for supervising convicted offenders in the community, either who are on probation, such as at the conclusion of their sentences, or while on community supervision orders.North Wales Narrow Gauge RailwaysOccupational hygiene: Occupational (or "industrial" in the U.S.Baden, Lower Saxony: Baden is a town near Bremen, in Lower Saxony, Germany. It is known to Africanists and Phoneticians as the place where Diedrich Hermann Westermann was born and died.Dundee Royal Infirmary: Dundee Royal Infirmary, often shortened to DRI, was a major teaching hospital in Dundee, Scotland. Until the opening of Ninewells Hospital in 1974, Dundee Royal Infirmary was Dundee’s main hospital.Health geography: Health geography is the application of geographical information, perspectives, and methods to the study of health, disease, and health care.Combination therapy: Combination therapy or polytherapy is therapy that uses more than one medication or modality (versus monotherapy, which is any therapy taken alone). Typically, these terms refer to using multiple therapies to treat a single disease, and often all the therapies are pharmaceutical (although it can also involve non-medical therapy, such as the combination of medications and talk therapy to treat depression).Mayo Clinic Diet: The Mayo Clinic Diet is a diet created by Mayo Clinic. Prior to this, use of that term was generally connected to fad diets which had no association with Mayo Clinic.

(1/32716) Incidence and occupational pattern of leukaemias, lymphomas, and testicular tumours in western Ireland over an 11 year period.

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine incidence of the following malignancies, testicular tumours, all leukaemias and all lymphomas in the West of Ireland in an 11 year period. Secondly, to examine the relation between disease patterns and available occupational data in male subjects of working age. DESIGN: A census survey of all cases occurring in the three counties in the Western Health Board (WHB) area, Galway, Mayo and Roscommon, for the 11 year period 1980 to 1990 inclusive. Average annual age standardised incidence rates for the period were calculated using the 1986 census data. Rates for the area are compared with rates from the southern region of Ireland, which had a tumour registry. Trends over the time period are evaluated. All male subjects for whom occupational data were available were categorised using the Irish socioeconomic group classification and incidence rates by occupation were compared using the standardised incidence ratio method. In one of the counties, Galway, a detailed occupational history of selected cases and an age matched control group was also elicited through patients' general practitioners. SETTING: All available case records in the West of Ireland. RESULTS: There are no national incidence records for the period. Compared with data from the Southern Tumour Registry, the number of cases of women with myeloid leukaemias was significantly lower. Male leukaemia rates were significantly lower as a group (SIR 84 (95% CI 74, 95) but not when considered as individual categories. Regression analysis revealed an increasing trend in the number of new cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among both men (r = 0.47, p = 0.02) and women (r = 0.90, p = 0.0001) and of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in men (r = 0.77, p = 0.005) and women (r = 0.68 p = 0.02) in the WHB region over the last decade. Four hundred and fifty six male cases over the age of 15 years were identified and adequate occupational information was available for 74% of these. Standardised incidence ratios of testicular tumours 100, 938) and agriworkers other than farmers (SIR 377, 95% CI 103, 967). There were also significantly increased incidence ratios for both non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR 169, 95% CI 124, 266) and three categories of leukaemias among farmers. Hodgkin's disease and acute myeloid leukaemias were significantly increased among semi-skilled people. Interview data with 90 cases and 54 controls of both sexes revealed that among farmers, cases (n = 31) were significantly less likely than controls (n = 20) to use tractor mounted spraying techniques (OR = 0.19 (95% CI 0.04, 0.80)) and less likely to wear protective masks (OR 0.22 (95% CI 0.05, 0.84)). CONCLUSIONS: Trends of increase in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and some leukaemias are consistent with studies elsewhere. The study provides further evidence of the relation between agricultural work and certain lymphoproliferative cancers. The possible carcinogenic role of chemicals used in agricultural industries must be considered as an explanation.  (+info)

(2/32716) Use of wood stoves and risk of cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract: a case-control study.

BACKGROUND: Incidence rates for cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract in Southern Brazil are among the highest in the world. A case-control study was designed to identify the main risk factors for carcinomas of mouth, pharynx, and larynx in the region. We tested the hypothesis of whether use of wood stoves is associated with these cancers. METHODS: Information on known and potential risk factors was obtained from interviews with 784 cases and 1568 non-cancer controls. We estimated the effect of use of wood stove by conditional logistic regression, with adjustment for smoking, alcohol consumption and for other sociodemographic and dietary variables chosen as empirical confounders based on a change-in-estimate criterion. RESULTS: After extensive adjustment for all the empirical confounders the odds ratio (OR) for all upper aero-digestive tract cancers was 2.68 (95% confidence interval [CI] : 2.2-3.3). Increased risks were also seen in site-specific analyses for mouth (OR = 2.73; 95% CI: 1.8-4.2), pharyngeal (OR = 3.82; 95% CI: 2.0-7.4), and laryngeal carcinomas (OR = 2.34; 95% CI: 1.2-4.7). Significant risk elevations remained for each of the three anatomic sites and for all sites combined even after we purposefully biased the analyses towards the null hypothesis by adjusting the effect of wood stove use only for positive empirical confounders. CONCLUSIONS: The association of use of wood stoves with cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract is genuine and unlikely to result from insufficient control of confounding. Due to its high prevalence, use of wood stoves may be linked to as many as 30% of all cancers occurring in the region.  (+info)

(3/32716) Constitutional, biochemical and lifestyle correlates of fibrinogen and factor VII activity in Polish urban and rural populations.

BACKGROUND: Fibrinogen and factor VII activity are known to be related to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, but population differences in clotting factors and modifiable characteristics that influence their levels have not been widely explored. METHODS: This paper examines correlates of plasma fibrinogen concentration and factor VII activity in 2443 men and women aged 35-64 in random samples selected from the residents in two districts in urban Warsaw (618 men and 651 women) and from rural Tarnobrzeg Province (556 men and 618 women) screened in 1987-1988, and assesses which characteristics might explain urban-rural differences. Fibrinogen and factor VII activity were determined using coagulation methods. RESULTS: Fibrinogen was 12.9 mg/dl higher in men and 14.1 mg/dl higher in women in Tarnobrzeg compared to Warsaw. Factor VII activity was higher in Warsaw (9.2% in men and 15.3% in women). After adjustment for selected characteristics, fibrinogen was higher in smokers compared to non-smokers by 28 mg/dl in men and 22 mg/dl in women. In women, a 15 mg/dl increase in HDL-cholesterol was associated with a 10 mg/dl decrease in fibrinogen (P < 0.01). After adjustment for other variables, a higher factor VII activity in Warsaw remained significant (a difference of 9.4% in men and 14.8% in women). Lower fibrinogen in Warsaw remained significant only in women (15.4 mg/dl difference). CONCLUSIONS: The study confirmed that sex, age, BMI, smoking and blood lipids are related to clotting factors. However, with the exception of gender differences and smoking, associations between clotting factors and other variables were small and of questionable practical importance.  (+info)

(4/32716) Short stature and cardiovascular disease among men and women from two southeastern New England communities.

BACKGROUND: Short stature has been associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), although the reason for the association remains unclear. Data on the relation between stature and stroke is more limited. We examined the association between stature and CHD as well as between stature and stroke in men and women from two communities in southeastern New England. METHODS: Coronary heart disease and stroke events were abstracted from medical records between January 1980 and December 1991. An epidemiological diagnostic algorithm developed to measure CHD was used in the present analysis. Unadjusted relative risks (RR) and RR adjusted for age, smoking status, obesity, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol <0.91 mmol/l, total cholesterol >6.21 mmol/l, hypertension, diabetes, education, and being foreign born were computed by gender-specific height categories separately for men (n = 2826) and women (n = 3741). RESULTS: A graded inverse association between stature and risk of CHD was observed among men which persisted after adjustment for confounders. Men >69.75 inches had an 83% lower risk of CHD compared with men < or = 65 inches. In addition, the tallest men had a 67% decreased risk of stroke compared with the shortest men. No significant relation between stature and CHD or stroke was observed among women. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the hypothesis that stature is inversely related to both risk of CHD and stroke at least among men. Factors which might explain this association remain to be determined.  (+info)

(5/32716) Screening for congenital heart malformation in child health centres.

BACKGROUND: Although screening for congenital heart malformations is part of the child health care programme in several countries, there are very few published evaluations of these activities. This report is concerned with the evaluation of this screening at the Dutch Child Health Centres (CHC). METHODS: All consecutive patients, aged between 32 days and 4 years, presented at the Sophia Children's Hospital Rotterdam throughout a period of 2 years, with a congenital heart malformation were included in this study. Paediatric cardiologists established whether or not these patients were diagnosed after haemodynamic complications had already developed (diagnosed 'too late'). Parents and CHC-physicians were interviewed in order to establish the screening and detection history. Test properties were established for all patients with a congenital heart malformation (n = 290), intended effects of screening were established in patients with clinically significant malformations (n = 82). RESULTS: The sensitivity of the actual screening programme was 0.57 (95% CI : 0.51-0.62), the specificity 0.985 (95% CI : 0.981-0.990) and the predictive value of a positive test result 0.13 (95% CI: 0.10-0.19). Sensitivity in a subpopulation of patients adequately screened was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.74-0.96). Adequately screened patients were less likely to be diagnosed 'too late' than inadequately screened patients (odds ratio [OR] = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.04-1.05). The actual risk of being diagnosed 'too late' in the study-population (48%) was only slightly less than the estimated risk for patients not exposed to CHC-screening (58%, 95% CI: 43%-72%). Adequately screened patients however were at considerably less risk (17%, 95% CI: 4%-48%). CONCLUSION: Screening for congenital heart malformations in CHC contributes to the timely detection of these disorders. The actual yield, however, is far from optimal, and the screening programme should be improved.  (+info)

(6/32716) Exposure to nitrogen dioxide and the occurrence of bronchial obstruction in children below 2 years.

BACKGROUND: The objective of the investigation was to test the hypothesis that exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has a causal influence on the occurrence of bronchial obstruction in children below 2 years of age. METHODS: A nested case-control study with 153 one-to-one matched pairs was conducted within a cohort of 3754 children born in Oslo in 1992/93. Cases were children who developed > or = 2 episodes of bronchial obstruction or one episode lasting >4 weeks. Controls were matched for date of birth. Exposure measurements were performed in the same 14-day period within matched pairs. The NO2 exposure was measured with personal samplers carried close to each child and by stationary samplers outdoors and indoors. RESULTS: Few children (4.6%) were exposed to levels of NO2 > or = 30 microg/m3 (average concentration during a 14-day period). In the 153 matched pairs, the mean level of NO2 was 15.65 microg/m3 (+/-0.60, SE) among cases and 15.37 (+/-0.54) among controls (paired t = 0.38, P = 0.71). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that NO2 exposure at levels observed in this study has no detectable effect on the risk of developing bronchial obstruction in children below 2 years of age.  (+info)

(7/32716) Socioeconomic inequalities and disability pension in middle-aged men.

BACKGROUND: The issue of inequalities in health has generated much discussion and socioeconomic status is considered an important variable in studies of health. It is frequently used in epidemiological studies, either as a possible risk factor or a confounder and the aim of this study was to analyse the relation between socioeconomic status and risk of disability pension. METHODS: Five complete birth year cohorts of middle-aged male residents in Malmo were invited to a health survey and 5782 with complete data constituted the cohort in this prospective study. Each subject was followed for approximately 11 years and nationwide Swedish data registers were used for surveillance. RESULTS: Among the 715 men (12%), granted disability pension during follow-up, three groups were distinguished. The cumulative incidence of disability pension among blue collar workers was 17% and among lower and higher level white collar workers, 11% and 6% respectively. With simultaneous adjustment for biological risk factors and job conditions, the relative risk for being granted a disability pension (using higher level white collar workers as reference) was 2.5 among blue collar workers and 1.6 among lower level white collar workers. CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic status, as defined by occupation, is a risk factor for being granted disability pension even after adjusting for work conditions and other risk factors for disease.  (+info)

(8/32716) Demographic, clinical and social factors associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection and other sexually transmitted diseases in a cohort of women from the United Kingdom and Ireland. MRC Collaborative Study of women with HIV.

BACKGROUND: Clinical experience suggests many women with HIV infection have experienced no other sexually transmitted diseases (STD). Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a substantial proportion of women with HIV infection in the United Kingdom and Ireland have experienced no other diagnosed STD and to describe the demographic, clinical and social factors associated with the occurrence of other STD in a cohort of HIV infected women. METHOD: Analysis of cross-sectional baseline data from a prospective study of 505 women with diagnosed HIV infection. The setting was 15 HIV treatment centres in the United Kingdom and Ireland. The main outcome measures were occurrence of other STD diagnosed for the first time before and after HIV diagnosis. Data were obtained from interview with women and clinic notes. We particularly focused on occurrence of gonorrhoea, chlamydia and trichomoniasis after HIV diagnosis, as these are the STD most likely to reflect recent unprotected sexual intercourse. RESULTS: The women were mainly infected via heterosexual sex (n = 304), and injection drug use (n = 174). 151 were black Africans. A total of 250 (49.5%) women reported never having been diagnosed with an STD apart from HIV, 255 (50.5%) women had ever experienced an STD besides HIV, including 109 (21.6%) who had their first other STD diagnosed after HIV. Twenty-five (5%) women reported having had chlamydia, gonorrhoea or trichomoniasis diagnosed for the first time after HIV diagnosis, possibly reflecting unprotected sexual intercourse since HIV diagnosis. In all 301 (60%) women reported having had sex with a man in the 6 months prior to entry to the study. Of these, 168 (58%) reported using condoms 'always', 66(23%) 'sometimes' and 56 (19%) 'never'. CONCLUSIONS: Half the women in this study reported having never experienced any other diagnosed STD besides HIV. However, after HIV diagnosis most women remain sexually active and at least 5% had an STD diagnosed which reflect unprotected sexual intercourse.  (+info)


Incidence...?


I need websites for incidence on scoliosis...if you have any information on the incidence of scoliosis please tell me. this project that im doing is HUGE. so i need it fast. thanks!
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May not be exactly what you are looking for, but hopefully this will help get you started:
http://www.medicinenet.com/scoliosis/article.htm


What is the single most important factor in reducing the incidence of osteoporosis in older women?


8)Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) has been shown to be one way to reduce the incidence of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women, however recent clinical trials have indicated there are dangerous increased risks of heart disease, stroke and various cancers associated with HRT.  What is the single most important factor in reducing the incidence of osteoporosis in older women and when do women need to start being concerned about this?
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I think the best method to help prevent osteoporosis is exercise.  Exercise strengthens the bones in men and women.  

Also there are good medications on the market to help prevent this condition:

If the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis is the only issue under consideration, then bisphosphonates such as alendronate, ibandronate, or risedronate are more effective than menopausal hormone therapy in preventing osteoporotic fractures, and less likely to be associated with substantial adverse effects. So far, bisphosphonates are the most effective category or prescription medications for treating postmenopausal osteoporosis.

hope this helps..


What are the latest mortality, morbidity, incidence rates in australia due to alcohol?


im sorry if the question doesnt sound smart, 
i didnt know how to put it. 
ahaha
i cant find the answer anywhere on the internet.

if the question does not make sense, this is whats on my assignment sheet. 

alcohol abuse - collect the latest australian statistics on mortality, morbidity, incidence and trends over time.
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The Australian Bureau of Statistics only lists statistics from 2004 - 2005...nice and up to date lol.  I found a few websites for 2007 but it looks like all your answers are on the Australian Bureau of Statistics website.

http://www.alcohol.sa.gov.au/site/page.cfm?u=88

http://www.ama.com.au/node/4762

http://abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/mf/4832.0.55.001/


Is the incidence of motions sickness declining in the last 30 years?


As a child, I suffered badly from motion sickness. It was the 1970's when cars were frankly uncomfortable, the roads appalling, and everyone smoked. Also journeys in cars, for me, were few and far between.

These days I rarely hear of people suffering from motion sickness, and my two kids never suffered from it. They were in and out of cars of relatively comfortable cars, on better roads, from day 1. 

So has the incidence of motion sickness declined due to people having more experience of better cars and roads or is it still as prevalent?
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Agree with you. I used to have problems on coach journeys,  never sit over the wheel !
Same on Ferries, although modern ferries are larger so you don't notice the motion as much...


Why does the Ukraine have the highest incidence of heart disease with average cholesterol levels of 186 - 201?


The Ukraine has the highest rate of heart disease than anywhere else on the planet...The death rate is 896.0 per 100,000 people.

Their cholesterol ranges are lower than average, yet they have the highest incidence of heart disease.

Does this mean that with lower cholesterol levels, my risk of having heart disease is greater?
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Many factors besides abnormal cholesterol contribute to heart disease, such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, sedentary lifestyle, smoking, Type A personality, etc. There is a very significant amount of evidence showing that elevated LDL and decreased HDL is associated with a significant increased risk of heart disease even when you control for all other variables. I am not sure what you are trying to accomplish by putting these biased questions on answers. You must not have much experience with research. This is observational data and it would be impossible to make any conclusions regarding cause and effect since there are too many variables.


Do Irish Americans have a higher incidence of mental issues including depression, schizophrenia, etc?


Do Irish Americans have a higher incidence of mental issues including schizophrenia, depression, alcoholism, bi-polar depression, etc? Any studies indicate yes or  no?
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It seems there were some studies done 20-30 years ago, the only book coming up is 'Stalking Irish Madness'  by Tracey

I dont know about MORE or higher incidence, since one could agrue mental illness for any race or nationality.......
It usually has to do with common acceptable behaviors that go unchallenged , that effect the mental health of the whole population.........eg   rape,  sexual assualt of children and women,  physical abuse, etc           that cause the mental illness rates to soar.


Does anyone have info pertaining to the incidence of skin cancer prior to the creation of sunscreen?


I realize there is much debate about the efficacy of sunscreen with respect to prevention of skin cancer.  I'm not looking for arguments pertaining to whether it does or doesn't work, I would simply like to know if anyone has info, or links to info, dealing with the incidence of skin cancer prior to the creation of sunscreen.
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Here is extensive information with tables looking at thirty years of data regarding the only really serious skin cancer - melanoma - recorded in the United Kingdom.  All you need to do is look up the data on use of sunscreens for the 1975 to 2006 period - if you can find it.  Good luck.
http://info.cancerresearchuk.org/cancerstats/types/skin/incidence/


Is there any conclusive study to prove that sex education of school kids reudces the incidence of HIV-AIDS?


There is too much hype abaout the desirability of having sex education in school kids to protect them from HIV-AIDS.

However, I have not found a single study on the internet that actually proves that sex education amongst school kids actually reduces the incidence of HIV -AIDS. Results of a few studies only are in the nature of baseles conclusions and conjectures.

Can anyone give me referencs of studies that PROVE any causal relationship between sex education in children and the incidence of HIV-AIDS?
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im not going to look for a study, youd be hard pressed to argue that increasing awareness of a preventable disease will not reduce transmission. think of some diseases they dont talk about in school. if you arent in the healthcare field, how much do you know about them and what needs to be done to prevent them?  do you know as much about hiv as you do hepatitis A? how about type 2 diabetes which is an 80-90% preventable disease, that affects something like 5-10% of american adults nowadays? 

transmission has slowed quite a bit in the US due to increased awareness (whtehr that be from school or other educational exposure) while it is the same or increasing in places like africa where people dont know anything about it