Nitrogen Fixation: The process in certain BACTERIA; FUNGI; and CYANOBACTERIA converting free atmospheric NITROGEN to biologically usable forms of nitrogen, such as AMMONIA; NITRATES; and amino compounds.Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Fracture Fixation: The use of metallic devices inserted into or through bone to hold a fracture in a set position and alignment while it heals.Complement Fixation Tests: Serologic tests based on inactivation of complement by the antigen-antibody complex (stage 1). Binding of free complement can be visualized by addition of a second antigen-antibody system such as red cells and appropriate red cell antibody (hemolysin) requiring complement for its completion (stage 2). Failure of the red cells to lyse indicates that a specific antigen-antibody reaction has taken place in stage 1. If red cells lyse, free complement is present indicating no antigen-antibody reaction occurred in stage 1.Tissue Fixation: The technique of using FIXATIVES in the preparation of cytologic, histologic, or pathologic specimens for the purpose of maintaining the existing form and structure of all the constituent elements.Ocular Hypertension: A condition in which the intraocular pressure is elevated above normal and which may lead to glaucoma.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Toxoplasmosis, Ocular: Infection caused by the protozoan parasite TOXOPLASMA in which there is extensive connective tissue proliferation, the retina surrounding the lesions remains normal, and the ocular media remain clear. Chorioretinitis may be associated with all forms of toxoplasmosis, but is usually a late sequel of congenital toxoplasmosis. The severe ocular lesions in infants may lead to blindness.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)External Fixators: External devices which hold wires or pins that are placed through one or both cortices of bone in order to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment. These devices allow easy access to wounds, adjustment during the course of healing, and more functional use of the limbs involved.Fixatives: Agents employed in the preparation of histologic or pathologic specimens for the purpose of maintaining the existing form and structure of all of the constituent elements. Great numbers of different agents are used; some are also decalcifying and hardening agents. They must quickly kill and coagulate living tissue.Dominance, Ocular: The functional superiority and preferential use of one eye over the other. The term is usually applied to superiority in sighting (VISUAL PERCEPTION) or motor task but not difference in VISUAL ACUITY or dysfunction of one of the eyes. Ocular dominance can be modified by visual input and NEUROTROPHIC FACTORS.Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary: The use of nails that are inserted into bone cavities in order to keep fractured bones together.Albinism, Ocular: Albinism affecting the eye in which pigment of the hair and skin is normal or only slightly diluted. The classic type is X-linked (Nettleship-Falls), but an autosomal recessive form also exists. Ocular abnormalities may include reduced pigmentation of the iris, nystagmus, photophobia, strabismus, and decreased visual acuity.Refraction, Ocular: Refraction of LIGHT effected by the media of the EYE.Orthopedic Fixation Devices: Devices which are used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases.Tonometry, Ocular: Measurement of ocular tension (INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE) with a tonometer. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Ocular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.Eye Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the EYE.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Bone Wires: Steel wires, often threaded through the skin, soft tissues, and bone, used to fix broken bones. Kirschner wires or apparatus also includes the application of traction to the healing bones through the wires.Ocular Motility Disorders: Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Bone Nails: Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Saccades: An abrupt voluntary shift in ocular fixation from one point to another, as occurs in reading.Tuberculosis, Ocular: Tuberculous infection of the eye, primarily the iris, ciliary body, and choroid.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Fractures, Comminuted: A fracture in which the bone is splintered or crushed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Tibial FracturesEye Infections, Parasitic: Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.Conjunctival DiseasesVision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Eye Infections: Infection, moderate to severe, caused by bacteria, fungi, or viruses, which occurs either on the external surface of the eye or intraocularly with probable inflammation, visual impairment, or blindness.Uveitis: Inflammation of part or all of the uvea, the middle (vascular) tunic of the eye, and commonly involving the other tunics (sclera and cornea, and the retina). (Dorland, 27th ed)Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Sclera: The white, opaque, fibrous, outer tunic of the eyeball, covering it entirely excepting the segment covered anteriorly by the cornea. It is essentially avascular but contains apertures for vessels, lymphatics, and nerves. It receives the tendons of insertion of the extraocular muscles and at the corneoscleral junction contains the canal of Schlemm. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)ConjunctivitisOcular Hypotension: Abnormally low intraocular pressure often related to chronic inflammation (uveitis).Formaldehyde: A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)Fractures, Ununited: A fracture in which union fails to occur, the ends of the bone becoming rounded and eburnated, and a false joint occurs. (Stedman, 25th ed)Convergence, Ocular: The turning inward of the lines of sight toward each other.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Nitrogenase: An enzyme system that catalyzes the fixing of nitrogen in soil bacteria and blue-green algae (CYANOBACTERIA). EC 1.18.6.1.Aqueous Humor: The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)Vitreous Body: The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.Anterior Eye Segment: The front third of the eyeball that includes the structures between the front surface of the cornea and the front of the VITREOUS BODY.Humeral FracturesCorneal Diseases: Diseases of the cornea.Iris: The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.Fractures, Closed: Fractures in which the break in bone is not accompanied by an external wound.Vision, Binocular: The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.Ciliary Body: A ring of tissue extending from the scleral spur to the ora serrata of the RETINA. It consists of the uveal portion and the epithelial portion. The ciliary muscle is in the uveal portion and the ciliary processes are in the epithelial portion.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Glaucoma: An ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Eye Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the eye; may also be hereditary.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Glutaral: One of the protein CROSS-LINKING REAGENTS that is used as a disinfectant for sterilization of heat-sensitive equipment and as a laboratory reagent, especially as a fixative.Osmium: Osmium. A very hard, gray, toxic, and nearly infusible metal element, atomic number 76, atomic weight 190.2, symbol Os. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Strabismus: Misalignment of the visual axes of the eyes. In comitant strabismus the degree of ocular misalignment does not vary with the direction of gaze. In noncomitant strabismus the degree of misalignment varies depending on direction of gaze or which eye is fixating on the target. (Miller, Walsh & Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p641)Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Choroid: The thin, highly vascular membrane covering most of the posterior of the eye between the RETINA and SCLERA.Oculomotor Muscles: The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.Histological Techniques: Methods of preparing tissue for examination and study of the origin, structure, function, or pathology.Anterior Chamber: The space in the eye, filled with aqueous humor, bounded anteriorly by the cornea and a small portion of the sclera and posteriorly by a small portion of the ciliary body, the iris, and that part of the crystalline lens which presents through the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p109)Accommodation, Ocular: The dioptric adjustment of the EYE (to attain maximal sharpness of retinal imagery for an object of regard) referring to the ability, to the mechanism, or to the process. Ocular accommodation is the effecting of refractive changes by changes in the shape of the CRYSTALLINE LENS. Loosely, it refers to ocular adjustments for VISION, OCULAR at various distances. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Carbon Cycle: The cycle by which the element carbon is exchanged between organic matter and the earth's physical environment.Administration, Ophthalmic: Application of pharmaceutically active agents on the tissues of the EYE.AcetyleneEyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.DislocationsEye Infections, Bacterial: Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. Some of the more common genera found are Haemophilus, Neisseria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Chlamydia.Refractive Errors: Deviations from the average or standard indices of refraction of the eye through its dioptric or refractive apparatus.Surgical Fixation Devices: Devices used to hold tissue structures together for repair, reconstruction or to close wounds. They may consist of adsorbable or non-adsorbable, natural or synthetic materials. They include tissue adhesives, skin tape, sutures, buttons, staples, clips, screws, etc., each designed to conform to various tissue geometries.Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Lens, Crystalline: A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.Eye Movement Measurements: Methods and procedures for recording EYE MOVEMENTS.Visual Fields: The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Fractures, Open: Fractures in which there is an external wound communicating with the break of the bone.Onchocerciasis, Ocular: Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.Pemphigoid, Benign Mucous Membrane: A chronic blistering disease with predilection for mucous membranes and less frequently the skin, and with a tendency to scarring. It is sometimes called ocular pemphigoid because of conjunctival mucous membrane involvement.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Retinal DiseasesEpithelium, Corneal: Stratified squamous epithelium that covers the outer surface of the CORNEA. It is smooth and contains many free nerve endings.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Chorioretinitis: Inflammation of the choroid in which the sensory retina becomes edematous and opaque. The inflammatory cells and exudate may burst through the sensory retina to cloud the vitreous body.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Glaucoma, Open-Angle: Glaucoma in which the angle of the anterior chamber is open and the trabecular meshwork does not encroach on the base of the iris.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Keratitis: Inflammation of the cornea.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Atlanto-Axial Joint: The joint involving the CERVICAL ATLAS and axis bones.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Nystagmus, Pathologic: Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Myopia: A refractive error in which rays of light entering the EYE parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus in front of the RETINA when accommodation (ACCOMMODATION, OCULAR) is relaxed. This results from an overly curved CORNEA or from the eyeball being too long from front to back. It is also called nearsightedness.Eye Infections, Viral: Infections of the eye caused by minute intracellular agents. These infections may lead to severe inflammation in various parts of the eye - conjunctiva, iris, eyelids, etc. Several viruses have been identified as the causative agents. Among these are Herpesvirus, Adenovirus, Poxvirus, and Myxovirus.Clavicle: A bone on the ventral side of the shoulder girdle, which in humans is commonly called the collar bone.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Root Nodules, Plant: Knobbed structures formed from and attached to plant roots, especially of LEGUMES, which result from symbiotic infection by nitrogen fixing bacteria such as RHIZOBIUM or FRANKIA. Root nodules are structures related to MYCORRHIZAE formed by symbiotic associations with fungi.Blepharitis: Inflammation of the eyelids.Fundus Oculi: The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Vision Disorders: Visual impairments limiting one or more of the basic functions of the eye: visual acuity, dark adaptation, color vision, or peripheral vision. These may result from EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; VISUAL PATHWAY diseases; OCCIPITAL LOBE diseases; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; and other conditions (From Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p132).Fovea Centralis: An area approximately 1.5 millimeters in diameter within the macula lutea where the retina thins out greatly because of the oblique shifting of all layers except the pigment epithelium layer. It includes the sloping walls of the fovea (clivus) and contains a few rods in its periphery. In its center (foveola) are the cones most adapted to yield high visual acuity, each cone being connected to only one ganglion cell. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).AxisProsthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Vision, Monocular: Images seen by one eye.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Wrist Injuries: Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.Scotoma: A localized defect in the visual field bordered by an area of normal vision. This occurs with a variety of EYE DISEASES (e.g., RETINAL DISEASES and GLAUCOMA); OPTIC NERVE DISEASES, and other conditions.Shoulder Fractures: Fractures of the proximal humerus, including the head, anatomic and surgical necks, and tuberosities.Scleritis: Refers to any inflammation of the sclera including episcleritis, a benign condition affecting only the episclera, which is generally short-lived and easily treated. Classic scleritis, on the other hand, affects deeper tissue and is characterized by higher rates of visual acuity loss and even mortality, particularly in necrotizing form. Its characteristic symptom is severe and general head pain. Scleritis has also been associated with systemic collagen disease. Etiology is unknown but is thought to involve a local immune response. Treatment is difficult and includes administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids. Inflammation of the sclera may also be secondary to inflammation of adjacent tissues, such as the conjunctiva.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Intra-Articular Fractures: Fractures of the articular surface of a bone.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Pupil: The aperture in the iris through which light passes.Timolol: A beta-adrenergic antagonist similar in action to PROPRANOLOL. The levo-isomer is the more active. Timolol has been proposed as an antihypertensive, antiarrhythmic, antiangina, and antiglaucoma agent. It is also used in the treatment of MIGRAINE DISORDERS and tremor.Keratitis, Herpetic: A superficial, epithelial Herpesvirus hominis infection of the cornea, characterized by the presence of small vesicles which may break down and coalesce to form dendritic ulcers (KERATITIS, DENDRITIC). (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Cataract: Partial or complete opacity on or in the lens or capsule of one or both eyes, impairing vision or causing blindness. The many kinds of cataract are classified by their morphology (size, shape, location) or etiology (cause and time of occurrence). (Dorland, 27th ed)Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Prostaglandins F, Synthetic: Analogs or derivatives of prostaglandins F that do not occur naturally in the body. They do not include the product of the chemical synthesis of hormonal PGF.Coloboma: Congenital anomaly in which some of the structures of the eye are absent due to incomplete fusion of the fetal intraocular fissure during gestation.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Conjunctival Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the CONJUNCTIVA.Sensory Deprivation: The absence or restriction of the usual external sensory stimuli to which the individual responds.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Odontoid Process: The toothlike process on the upper surface of the axis, which articulates with the CERVICAL ATLAS above.ReadingEye ProteinsOphthalmoscopy: Examination of the interior of the eye with an ophthalmoscope.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Fractures, Malunited: Union of the fragments of a fractured bone in a faulty or abnormal position. If two bones parallel to one another unite by osseous tissue, the result is a crossunion. (From Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 4th ed)Corneal Opacity: Disorder occurring in the central or peripheral area of the cornea. The usual degree of transparency becomes relatively opaque.Uvea: The pigmented vascular coat of the eyeball, consisting of the CHOROID; CILIARY BODY; and IRIS, which are continuous with each other. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Pursuit, Smooth: Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.Eye Burns: Injury to any part of the eye by extreme heat, chemical agents, or ultraviolet radiation.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Lacrimal Apparatus: The tear-forming and tear-conducting system which includes the lacrimal glands, eyelid margins, conjunctival sac, and the tear drainage system.Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the eye or of vision disorders.Diplopia: A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.Keratitis, Dendritic: A form of herpetic keratitis characterized by the formation of small vesicles which break down and coalesce to form recurring dendritic ulcers, characteristically irregular, linear, branching, and ending in knoblike extremities. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Iritis: Inflammation of the iris characterized by circumcorneal injection, aqueous flare, keratotic precipitates, and constricted and sluggish pupil along with discoloration of the iris.Uveitis, Anterior: Inflammation of the anterior uvea comprising the iris, angle structures, and the ciliary body. Manifestations of this disorder include ciliary injection, exudation into the anterior chamber, iris changes, and adhesions between the iris and lens (posterior synechiae). Intraocular pressure may be increased or reduced.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Arthrodesis: The surgical fixation of a joint by a procedure designed to accomplish fusion of the joint surfaces by promoting the proliferation of bone cells. (Dorland, 28th ed)Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Cervical Atlas: The first cervical vertebra.Autotrophic Processes: The processes by which organisms use simple inorganic substances such as gaseous or dissolved carbon dioxide and inorganic nitrogen as nutrient sources. Contrasts with heterotrophic processes which make use of organic materials as the nutrient supply source. Autotrophs can be either chemoautotrophs (or chemolithotrophs), largely ARCHAEA and BACTERIA, which also use simple inorganic substances for their metabolic energy reguirements; or photoautotrophs (or photolithotrophs), such as PLANTS and CYANOBACTERIA, which derive their energy from light. Depending on environmental conditions some organisms can switch between different nutritional modes (autotrophy; HETEROTROPHY; chemotrophy; or PHOTOTROPHY) to utilize different sources to meet their nutrient and energy requirements.Retinal Vessels: The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.Eyelid DiseasesMicroscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Keratoconjunctivitis: Simultaneous inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva.Eye Infections, Fungal: Infection by a variety of fungi, usually through four possible mechanisms: superficial infection producing conjunctivitis, keratitis, or lacrimal obstruction; extension of infection from neighboring structures - skin, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx; direct introduction during surgery or accidental penetrating trauma; or via the blood or lymphatic routes in patients with underlying mycoses.Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Fibula: The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.Freeze Substitution: A modification of the freeze-drying method in which the ice within the frozen tissue is replaced by alcohol or other solvent at a very low temperature.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Scaphoid Bone: The bone which is located most lateral in the proximal row of CARPAL BONES.Volar Plate: A thick, fibrocartilaginous ligament at the metacarpophalageal joint.Microphthalmos: Congenital or developmental anomaly in which the eyeballs are abnormally small.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Staining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.Eye Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the eye.Ophthalmic Artery: Artery originating from the internal carotid artery and distributing to the eye, orbit and adjacent facial structures.Preservatives, Pharmaceutical: Substances added to pharmaceutical preparations to protect them from chemical change or microbial action. They include ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS and antioxidants.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Hyperopia: A refractive error in which rays of light entering the eye parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus behind the retina, as a result of the eyeball being too short from front to back. It is also called farsightedness because the near point is more distant than it is in emmetropia with an equal amplitude of accommodation. (Dorland, 27th ed)Conjunctivitis, Allergic: Conjunctivitis due to hypersensitivity to various allergens.Blindness: The inability to see or the loss or absence of perception of visual stimuli. This condition may be the result of EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; OPTIC CHIASM diseases; or BRAIN DISEASES affecting the VISUAL PATHWAYS or OCCIPITAL LOBE.Burns, ChemicalOculomotor Nerve: The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.Sacrum: Five fused VERTEBRAE forming a triangle-shaped structure at the back of the PELVIS. It articulates superiorly with the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, inferiorly with the COCCYX, and anteriorly with the ILIUM of the PELVIS. The sacrum strengthens and stabilizes the PELVIS.Histocytological Preparation Techniques: Methods of preparing cells or tissues for examination and study of their origin, structure, function, or pathology. The methods include preservation, fixation, sectioning, staining, replica, or other technique to allow for viewing using a microscope.Eye Enucleation: The surgical removal of the eyeball leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact.Visual Field Tests: Method of measuring and mapping the scope of vision, from central to peripheral of each eye.Visual Cortex: Area of the OCCIPITAL LOBE concerned with the processing of visual information relayed via VISUAL PATHWAYS.Photosynthesis: The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)Conjunctivitis, Viral: Inflammation, often mild, of the conjunctiva caused by a variety of viral agents. Conjunctival involvement may be part of a systemic infection.

*  Frequency doubling technology perimetry in non-arteritic ischaemic optic...
Therefore, because of ocular scatter and small fixation shifts, the larger FDT stimulus which is ... Conversely, ocular scatter associated with the larger FDT stimulus could possibly mask areas of ... 10 subjects (20 eyes) with normal ocular examinations and full appearing optic nerve heads were ... ocular scatter is unlikely to affect the geographic extent of visual field defects determined by ......
http://bjo.bmj.com/content/88/10/1274
*  Retinoblastoma Imaging: Overview, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance...
On CT scans, RB is seen as a mass that is predominantly located in the posterior ocular pole. The ... and maintained fixation. Sensorium: Awake but irritable. Diagnostics: Intracranial extension on CT ... Three-dimensional high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of ocular and orbital malignancies. ... and maintained fixation. Sensorium: Awake but irritable. Diagnostics: Intracranial extension on CT ......
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/412746-overview
*  Professor Stuart Graham - The University of Sydney
Klistorner, A., Graham, S., bilson, F., Martins, A. (2005). Effect of fixation tasks on multifocal ... Analysis of risk factors that may be associated with progression from ocular hypertension to ... Klistorner, A., Graham, S., bilson, F., Martins, A. (2005). Effect of fixation tasks on multifocal ... Analysis of risk factors that may be associated with progression from ocular hypertension to ......
http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/people/academics/profiles/s.graham.php
*  biosink: 11/4/07 - 11/11/07
... spinal fixation implants and associated surgical methods, general orthopedic implants and total ... ocular or neurological disease, microbiology, immunology including vaccine and antibody technology ......
http://biosink.blogspot.com/2007_11_04_archive.html
*  Heidelberg retinal flowmetry: factors affecting blood flow measurement |...
In each of the studies, a fixation point was provided at a distance of 3 metres, to avoid errors as ... 1996) Involvement of integrins alpha v beta 3 and alpha v beta 5 in ocular neovascular diseases. ... Healthy subjects free from eye disease and with no history of ocular trauma were used in each phase ... 1988) Nerve fiber layer and optic disk fluorescein defects in glaucoma and ocular hypertension. ......
http://bjo.bmj.com/content/82/2/131
*  Erbium:YAG Laser Ablation of Retinal Tissue under Perfluorodecaline:...
The rapid fixation of the retinal tissue was able to reduce artificial retinal detachment. In ... Peyman GA, Katoh N. Effects of an erbium:YAG laser on ocular structures. Int Ophthalmol. 1987;10: ... Fixation of laser-exposed posterior pig eye segments in Karnowsky's fixative proved to have several ... Bende T, Seiler T, Wollensak J. Photoablation with the ER:YAG laser in ocular tissues. Fortschritte ......
http://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2199856
*  Retinal image shifts, but not eye movements per se, cause alternations in...
In Experiment 3, a black disk (1.6°) and a fixation target (0.4°) were added to the grating ... Wolfe, J. M. (1984). Reversing ocular dominance and suppression in a single flash. Vision Research ... Subjects were either free to make eye movements ( Experiment 1) or instructed to fixate a fixation ... Experiment 2: Binocular rivalry and fixation. *Experiment 3: Retinal image changes without saccades ......
http://jov.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2121941
*  neurontin side effects vertigo
... of fingers can easily be shown only briefly before the ne urontin is forced to change fixation. ... light in ophthalmic instruments can decrease the risk of retinal damage during ocular surgery or ......
http://outoff.ru/best-pills-in-india/neurontin-side-effects-vertigo.html
*  JURNAL ATANI TOKYO: Respon Pembentukan Antibodi pada Tikus Putih Terhadap...
Ocular infections in animal with PLT (Bedsonia) group agents. Am. J. Opthhalmol. 64: 1270-1273.. ... Serum tikus putih SPF yang tidak mengandung antibodi Chlamydia pada complement fixation test dan ......
http://atanitokyo.blogspot.com/2009/12/respon-pembentukan-antibodi-pada-tikus.html
*  Anti-PITX3 抗体 - Neuronal Marker (ab30734)
... also known as anterior segment ocular dysgenesis (ASOD). ASMD consists of a range of developmental ... PFA perfused animals underwent overnight fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde, cryoprotected in 30% ......
http://abcam.co.jp/pitx3-antibody-neuronal-marker-ab30734.html
*  MSU News - Lecture on biological nitrogen fixation set for Feb. 23 at MSU
... Directories A-Z Index. University Communications. MSU News Lecture on biological nitrogen fixation set for Feb. 23 at MSU February 9, 2011 -- MSU News Service. Subscribe to MSU Newsletters E-mail:. Bobcat Bulletin Bobcat Bulletin is a weekly e-newsletter designed to bring the most recent and relevant news about Montana State University directly to friends and neighbors via email. Visit Bobcat Bulletin. MSU Today MSU Today e-mail brings you news and events on campus thrice weekly during the academic year. Visit the MSU Today calendar. Subscribe. Recent News Fifth Annual Cat Walk set for Aug. 22. Open house at MSU’s Brick Breeden Fieldhouse set for Aug. 20. MSU suggests routes to help students navigate one-way streets during move-in period. MSU earns top Montana spot in global ranking. Online course helps parents, professionals assist traumatized children. MSU News Service Tel: 406 994-4571 msunews@montana.edu. BOZEMAN -- A free public lecture about biological nitrogen fixation will be given on Wednesday, ...
http://montana.edu/news/9458/lecture-on-biological-nitrogen-fixation-set-for-feb-23-at-msu
*  WQ261 Nitrogen in the Environment: Nitrogen Fixation | University of Missouri Extension
University of Missouri Extension WQ261, Reviewed October 1993 Nitrogen in the Environment: Nitrogen Fixation Scott C. Killpack and Daryl Buchholz Department of Agronomy Nitrogen can be found in many forms in our environment. Nitrogen is also very important for plants to live. The earth's atmosphere is made up of 78 percent nitrogen in the form of a colorless, odorless, nontoxic gas. The same nitrogen gas found in the atmosphere can be found in spaces between soil particles. However, plants are unable to use this form of nitrogen. Certain microorganisms found in the soil are able to convert atmospheric nitrogen into forms plants can use. This is called biological nitrogen fixation. Types of nitrogen fixation In addition to biological fixation that takes place by microorganisms in the soil, fixation can also take place chemically. An example of this is in the fertilizer industry where atmospheric nitrogen N 2 can be combined with hydrogen H + to make anhydrous ammonia NH 3 and other nitrogen fertilizer prod...
http://extension.missouri.edu/publications/DisplayPrinterFriendlyPub.aspx?P=WQ261
*  Nitrogen Fixation Process In Plants To Combat Drought In Various Species Of Legumes -- ScienceDaily
... Your source for the latest research news. Nitrogen Fixation Process In Plants To Combat Drought In Various Species Of Legumes. Date: January 25, 2008 Source: Basque Research Summary: The regulation of the biological fixation of nitrogen in hydric stress conditions varies with the different species of legume plants studied. The regulation of the biological fixation of nitrogen in hydric stress conditions varies with the different species of legume plants studied. Biological fixation of nitrogen. These nitrogen-fixing organisms also called diazotrophs , can fix nitrogen either as free living or in symbiosis with plants. What happens in drought or hydric stress. These results show that the regulation of the BFN in Soya, in hydric stress conditions, is produced at a localised level, in the nodule itself, and that the metabolism of carbon and nitrogen is involved in this. "Nitrogen Fixation Process In Plants To Combat Drought In Various Species Of Legumes." ScienceDaily. Nitrogen Fixation Process In Plants To...
http://sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080123085302.htm
*  Biological nitrogen fixation
... redirect nitrogen fixation biological nitrogen fixation...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_nitrogen_fixation
*  Late-season nitrogen for soybean? | Ag Professional
Log in or register to post comments. Log in or register to post comments. Log in or register to post comments. aileen123 1 month 2 weeks ago ideal and little stress, ideal and little stress, there is some evidence that the biological nitrogen fixation that is taking place in the soybean root nodule cannot keep up with the plant’s N needs. Log in or register to post comments. aileen123 1 month 2 weeks ago ideal and little stress, ideal and little stress, there is some evidence that the biological nitrogen fixation that is taking place in the soybean root nodule cannot keep up with the plant’s N needs. Log in or register to post comments. aileen123 1 month 2 weeks ago conditions are ideal and conditions are ideal and little stress, there is some evidence that the biological nitrogen fixation that is taking place in the soybean root nodule cannot keep up with the plant’s N needs. Log in or register to post comments. Log in or register to post comments. Log in or register to post comments. aileen123 1 month 2 wee...
http://agprofessional.com/resource-centers/crop-fertility/nitrogen/news/Late-season-nitrogen-for-soybean-218355711.html
*  Nitrogen fixation
... Industrial nitrogen fixation Haber process. Ambient nitrogen reduction. 4 Biological nitrogen fixation 'BNF' occurs when atmospheric nitrogen is converted to ammonia by an enzyme called a nitrogenase. Plants that contribute to nitrogen fixation include the legume family. They contain symbiotic bacteria called rhizobia within nodules in their root systems, producing nitrogen compounds that help the plant to grow and compete with other plants. Although by far the majority of plants able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodules are in the legume family Fabaceae, there are a few exceptions:. Industrial nitrogen fixation. The Ostwald process for the production of nitric acid was discovered in 1902. Frank-Caro process and Ostwald process dominated the industrial fixation of nitrogen until the discovery of the Haber process in 1909. The first dinitrogen complex to be reported was Ru NH 3 5 N 2 2+. Synthetic nitrogen reduction Yandulov 2003|thumb|right In 2003 a related molybdenum amido complex was found to catalyze...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen_fixation
*  PLOS Computational Biology: Metabolic Reconstruction and Modeling of Nitrogen Fixation in Rhizobium
... etli. Other Article Types. Article-Level Metrics. View. Sum of PLOS and PubMed Central page views and downloads. Open Access Peer-reviewed Research Article. Metabolic Reconstruction and Modeling of Nitrogen Fixation in Rhizobium etli. Article. This reconstruction spans 26 metabolic pathways involving central metabolism 44 reactions, amino acids metabolism 136 reactions, purine and pyrimidine metabolism 89 reactions, PHB synthesis 8 reactions, and nitrogen metabolism 19 reactions. Metabolic Pathways for Rhizobium etli The metabolic reconstruction for R. After reviewing the available literature, we can postulate an OF for use in FBA, which represents symbiotic nitrogen fixation in R. From a physiological point of view, there are some other possible explanations for reduced nitrogen fixation when the myo-inositol dehydrogenase enzyme is inactive. From our in silico analysis, we observe that a deletion of myo-inositol dehydrogenase enzyme decreases nitrogen fixation activity, although it is not essential for...
http://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.0030192
*  Resource Optimization and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation - Springer
... Search Help. Resource Optimization and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation. Affiliated with The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA. Affiliated with Department of Biological, Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. Affiliated with Department of Plant Biology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, California 94305, USA; and. Affiliated with The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA. Affiliated with The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA. Affiliated with Department of Ecology and Environmental Research, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7072, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. In temperate forests, symbiotic nitrogen N fixation is restricted to the early phases of succession despite the persistence of N limitation on production late in succession. Because of this optimization, N fixation should be restricted to periods when fixat...
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10021-001-0018-z
*  Which Comes First? USU Biochemists 'Cracking Code' of Nitrogen Fixation - College of Science - www.u
USU Biochemists 'Cracking Code' of Nitrogen Fixation - College of Science - www.usu.edu. USU Biochemists 'Cracking Code' of Nitrogen Fixation. USU Biochemists 'Cracking Code' of Nitrogen Fixation. USU biochemist Karamatullah Danyal, a doctoral candidate in Professor Lance Seefeldt s lab, uses a quench flow instrument in a glove box, while investigating steps of nitrogen fixation. He's part of a USU team that published two papers in the Sept. 23 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. USU biochemists, from left, Edwin Antony, Nimesh Khadka, Karamatullah Danyal, Lance Seefeldt seated, Sudipta Shaw and Zhi-Yong Yang are studying nitrogen fixation in Seefeldt s lab. In each paper, the researchers, under the leadership of USU biochemistry professor Lance Seefeldt, describe newly discovered insights about nitrogen fixation, a process that converts life-sustaining nitrogen into a form that humans, animals and plants can access. It s an incredible irony, says Seefeldt, professor in USU s Department of Chemis...
https://usu.edu/science/htm/which-comes-first-usu-biochemists-cracking-code-of-nitrogen-fixation/
*  CO2 and light effects on growth, photosynthesis, carbon acquisition and nitrogen fixation of the d
... iazotrophic cyanobacteria Trichodemium - ePIC. Programs. Research Networks. Citation Guide. Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung. EPIC.awi.de. Programs. Research Networks. Citation Guide. CO2 and light effects on growth, photosynthesis, carbon acquisition and nitrogen fixation of the diazotrophic cyanobacteria Trichodemium. 2009 : CO2 and light effects on growth, photosynthesis, carbon acquisition and nitrogen fixation of the diazotrophic cyanobacteria Trichodemium, ASLO, 25 - 30 January 2009, Nice, France. Cite this page as: hdl: 10013/epic.31851 Contact Email: Sven.Kranz@awi.de Related Data:. Abstract: Recent studies on the diazotrophic cyanobacteria Trichodesmium showed a pronounced CO2 dependency in N2- and C-fixation. To this end, we investigated carbon acquisition and nitrogen fixation in Trichodesmium IMS101 under different CO2 and light levels. Nitrogen fixation rates were determined using the acetylene reduction assay, and chlorophyll a fluorescence was measure...
http://epic.awi.de/19938/
*  Publications: Centre for Rhizobium Studies - Murdoch Research Repository
Ardley, J. , Tian, R. , Howieson, J. , Yates, R. , Bräu, L. , Han, J. , Huntemann, M. , Mavromatis, K. , Markowitz, V. , Ivanova, N. , Pati, A. , Goodwin, L. , Woyke, T. , Kyrpides, N. and Reeve, W. Standards in Genomic Sciences, 9 1. Ardley, J.K. , O'Hara, G.W. , Reeve, W.G. , Yates, R.J. , Dilworth, M.J. , Tiwari, R.P. and Howieson, J.G. Archives of Microbiology, 191 4. Ardley, J.K. , De Meyer, S.E. , O'Hara, G.W. , Reeve, W.G. , Yates, R.J. , Dilworth, M.J. and Howieson, J.G. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 62 11. Ardley, J.K. , Reeve, W.G. , O'Hara, G.W. , Yates, R.J. , Dilworth, M.J. and Howieson, J.G. , Howieson, J. 2012 The genetics of symbiotic nitrogen fixation: Comparative genomics of 14 rhizobia strains by resolution of protein clusters. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 64 Pt 4. 2015 High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the Lebeckia - nodulating Burkholderia dilworthii strain WSM3556T. 2000 Estimation of host-strain com...
http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/view/affiliations/crs.html
*  Microbe Fixes Nitrogen At A Blistering 92 C, May Offer Clues To Evolution Of Nitrogen Fixation -- Sc
... ienceDaily. Your source for the latest research news. Mobile. Follow. Subscribe. Breaking News :. Rocks Show First Photosynthesis That Made Oxygen. Understanding Others' Thoughts Helps Kids to Lie. Extremely Light Storage Device as E-Car Battery. Birds Flew Over the Heads of Dinosaurs. Hog-Nose Rat Discovered. Foot Fossil: Evolutionary Messiness of Walking. Migrating Songbirds Can Be Tricked by Magnets. Fossils Intensify Mystery of Odd Toothy Mammal. Predator Survives, but Ecosystem Crashes. Restoring Vision With Stem Cells. Science News from research organizations. Microbe Fixes Nitrogen At A Blistering 92 C, May Offer Clues To Evolution Of Nitrogen Fixation. Date: December 15, 2006 Source: University of Washington Summary: A heat-loving archaeon capable of fixing nitrogen at a surprisingly hot 92 degrees Celsius, or 198 Fahrenheit, may represent Earth's earliest lineages of organisms capable of nitrogen fixation, perhaps even preceding the kinds of bacteria today's plants and animals rely on to fix nitr...
http://sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/12/061215091006.htm
*  Phosphate availability and the ultimate control of new nitrogen input by nitrogen fixation in the tr
... opical Pacific Ocean. About WHOAS Toggle navigation. View Item. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry MC G. View Item. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry MC G. View Item. All of WHOAS Communities Collections By Issue Date Authors Titles Keywords This Collection By Issue Date Authors Titles Keywords. Phosphate availability and the ultimate control of new nitrogen input by nitrogen fixation in the tropical Pacific Ocean. The observed trend over the last 20 years has shown a decrease in the dissolved inorganic phosphate DIP pool in the North Pacific gyre, which has been correlated to the increase in di-nitrogen N2 fixation rates. We observed a decrease in DIP concentration from the edges to the centre of the gyre. Nevertheless the DIP concentrations remained above 100 nmol L 1 and T DIP was more than 6 months in the centre of the gyre; DIP availability remained largely above the level required for phosphate limitation to occur and the abs...
https://darchive.mblwhoilibrary.org/handle/1912/2097
*  Tropical forests 'fix' themselves: Nitrogen fixation in tropics has far-reaching implications for gl
... obal warming - Chemistry2011.org. Chemistry 2011 .org All About Chemistry... New to Chemistry2011.org. Chemistry 2011 Home. Chemistry Projects. News & Event Resources. Tropical forests 'fix' themselves: Nitrogen fixation in tropics has far-reaching implications for global warming. 15, 2013 — Tropical forests speed their own recovery, capturing nitrogen and carbon faster after being logged or cleared for agriculture. Researchers working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama think the discovery that trees "turn up" their ability to capture or "fix" nitrogen from the air and release it into the soil as the forest makes a comeback has far-reaching implications for forest restoration projects to mitigate global warming. "This is the first solid case showing how nitrogen fixation by tropical trees directly affects the rate of carbon recovery after agricultural fields are abandoned," said Jefferson Hall, STRI staff scientist. "Trees turn nitrogen fixation on and off according to the need for n...
http://chemistry2011.org/news/AnalyticalChemistry/EnvironmentalChemistry/AtmosphericChemistry/TropicalForestsFixThemselvesNitrogenFixationInTropicsHasFarreachingImplicationsForGlobalWarming
*  : Nitrogen fixation helps double some African farm yields
: Nitrogen fixation helps double some African farm yields. Top Stories Nitrogen fixation helps double... Our Editorial Affiliate Network. From: Joris Tielens, SciDevNet , More from this Affiliate Published November 5, 2013 08:59 AM Nitrogen fixation helps double some African farm yields RELATED ARTICLES Desert bacteria could help boost crop yields February 6, 2013 03:53 PM. A large-scale research and development project has shown that giving farmers resources and advice on nitrogen fixation through legume plants can double yields and boost incomes in Africa. But not all farmers are benefiting from this practice due to a lack of access to inputs, such as fertilizers says Ken Giller, the leader of the N2Africa project, as a second phase to widen access to the initiative is announced with US$25.3 million funding from the Bill Melinda Gates Foundation for the next five years. This was carried out by a partnership comprising Wageningen University in the Netherlands, the International Centre for Tropical Agricultur...
http://enn.com/top_stories/article/46637
*  ARS Project: Germplasm Enhancement for Improved Biological Nitrogen Efficiency in Common Bean (42024
ARS Project: Germplasm Enhancement for Improved Biological Nitrogen Efficiency in Common Bean 420248 Annual Report Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research : Research. Page Banner. United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. ARS Home. About ARS. ARS Research. National Programs. Research Projects. Scientific Manuscripts. International Programs. Trending Research Topics. Scientific Collaborations. ARS People Locations. Find a person. Find a location. Find an office at headquarters. ARS Newsroom. News Home. Briefing Room. ARS Careers. Careers at ARS Info. Site Map. You are here: Pacific West Area Home / Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research / Research / Research Project #420248. Project Annual Reports 2013. Related National Programs Plant Genetic Resources, Genomics and Genetic Improvement 301. Plant Diseases 303. Other Research Projects. Research Project:. Germplasm Enhancement for Improved Biological Nitrogen Efficiency in Common Bean. Location: Grain Legume Genetics Physiology ...
http://ars.usda.gov/research/projects/projects.htm?ACCN_NO=420248&fy=2011
*  Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen
... An international team of scientists from the University of Frankfurt in Germany, Berkeley Lab, Kansas State University, and Auburn University has now resolved the issue with an appropriate twist of quantum fuzziness. By means of coincident detection of the photoelectron ejected from molecular nitrogen and the Auger electron emitted femtoseconds later, the team found that how the measurements are done determines which description—localized or delocalized—is valid. Artist’s view of the asymmetric angular distributions obtained by coincident detection of the photoelectron emerging from a N 2 molecule blue of the photoelectron left and the Auger electron emitted 7 fs later right for the case of a localized core hole in a N 2 molecule. As the two electrons form an entangled state, the Auger electron right is also localized. Experimentally, one measures the coincident distribution of the photoelectron for a fixed direction of the Auger electron relative to the molecular axis and of the Auger electron for a fix...
http://www-als.lbl.gov/index.php/visitors/access-to-the-als/173-probing-core-hole-localization-in-molecular-nitrogen.html
*  .. Tag: nitrogen fixing plants .. All Nitrogen Fixers Are Not Created Equal: By Eric Toensmeier ..
Tag: nitrogen fixing plants All Nitrogen Fixers Are Not Created Equal: By Eric Toensmeier Eric Toensmeier is the author of Perennial Vegetables and the co author of Edible Forest Gardens Volumes 1/2. He has a wealth of knowledge when it comes to food forestry, permaculture design, and useful plants. What follows is an essay Eric recently wrote about the nitrogen fixing capacities of a variety of plants from different regions. This one’s especially good for the plant geek within you. Learn more by visiting Eric’s website www.perennialsolutions.org .Â. All Nitrogen Fixers Are Not Created Equal. Nitrogen fixing species are a cornerstone of food forestry and other permaculture practices. Through a partnership with symbiotic organisms in their roots, these plants can turn atmospheric nitrogen into nitrogen fertilizers useful to themselves but also becoming available to their neighbors over time through root die back, leaf fall, and chop and drop coppice management. While it does not replace the need to bring in p...
http://thefruitnut.com/tag/nitrogen-fixing-plants/
*  Bernd Masepohl, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Biologie der Mikroorganismen - ResearchGate
Bernd Masepohl. Are you Bernd Masepohl. Article:. Franz Narberhaus Bernd Masepohl. Journal of Bacteriology 07/2014; 196 19. Article:. Coordinated Expression of fdxD and molybdenum nitrogenase genes promotes nitrogen fixation by Rhodobacter capsulatus in the presence of oxygen. Franz Narberhaus Bernd Masepohl. Expression of fdxD strictly required NifA1 and NifA2, the transcriptional activators of the Mo-nitrogenase genes, but not AnfA, the transcriptional activator of the Fe-nitrogenase genes. Journal of bacteriology 11/2013; 196 3. Article:. DOI:10.1099/mic.0.058487-0 2.56 Impact Factor Source Available from: Franz Narberhaus. Article:. Franz Narberhaus Bernd Masepohl. Article:. Franz Narberhaus Bernd Masepohl. Journal of bacteriology 01/2012; 194 8 :1849-59. Article:. ABSTRACT: The LysR-type regulator MopB represses transcription of several target genes including the nitrogen-fixation gene anfA in Rhodobacter capsulatus at high molybdenum concentrations. DOI:10.1107/S1744309110054710 0.53 Impact Factor Sourc...
http://researchgate.net/researcher/39210599_Bernd_Masepohl
*  Description: Molybdenum, Phosphorous, and Nitrogen Availability Control Rates of Biological N2-fixat
description molybdenum phosphorous and nitrogen availability control rates of biological n fixation in boreal peatlands katherine dynarski skip to content toggle navigation falvey memorial library vu home falvey memorial library all fields title author subject find advanced search falvey home home collections undergraduate honors theses villanova digital collection molybdenum phosphorous and nitrogen availability control rates of biological n fixation in boreal cite this text this email this export record export to refworks export to endnoteweb export to endnote molybdenum phosphorous and nitrogen availability control rates of biological n fixation in boreal peatlands katherine dynarski bsh advisor dr melanie a vile main author dynarski katherine format thesis language english published subjects peatlands a...
http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Record/vudl:302163/Description
*  WANTS POSTDOC IN METAL TOXICITY/NITROGEN FIXATION
... dsrinivas at kean.ucs.mun.ca dsrinivas at kean.ucs.mun.ca. Fri Nov 12 13:18:33 EST 1993. Previous message: Address for Bacharach. Next message: Rosaphil@echonyc.com would like to subscribe to your newsr Messages sorted by:. Greetings: LOOKING FOR POSTDOC POSITION IN METAL TOXICITY OR IN NITROGEN FIXATION My academic background and seven years of experience include a M.Sc in Cytogenetics and Plant Breeding of Crops a M.Phil and a Ph.D in Metal Toxicity on Plants. The research work for the M.Phil was on Toxicity of lead and its interaction with chelating agents in soil-plant systems and for first doctorate degree was on Effects of lead, manganese and chelating agents on some vegetable crops. During that period I was exposed to various physiological and biochemical techniques. Basically, I was involved in the estimation of certain enzymes and proteins besides studying various physiological aspects of plants exposed to metal stress and accumulation of metal ions in various plant parts in the presence and abs...
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/plantbio/1993-November/002045.html
*  IDL-BNC @ IDRC: Studies on symbiotic nitrogen fixation in white clover and field beans
idl bnc idrc studies on symbiotic nitrogen fixation in white clover and field beans english français skip navigation home about idrc digital library idrc library conditions of use search browse themes and sub themes browse items by titles authors subjects date help login log into the idrc digital library subscribe to alerts idl bnc idrc idrc crdi idrc research results résultats de recherches du crdi attribution please use this identifier to share cite or link to this item http hdl handle net title studies x on x symbiotic x nitrogen x fixation x in x white x clover x and x field x beans authors ghobashi x a a e keywords leguminosae bacteria plant x nutrition nitrogen x fixation fava x beans experiments date publisher university x college x of x wales x welsh x plant x breeding x station x aberystwyth x gb description thesis thesis x m sc x university x college x of x wales x uri http x f x f hdl handle net x f x f project number project title project x related x awards x x access idrc x only files in this ite...
http://idl-bnc.idrc.ca/dspace/handle/10625/4016
*  CarPro Fixer Polishing Compound 1 Liter
... Customer Service. 1.800.215.4460 Shipping. Orders usually ship same day. MY ACCOUNT - ORDER HISTORY. Sign In. MY ACCOUNT - ORDER HISTORY. Welcome $$firstName$$. Sign Out. Bookmark this Page Email this page to a Friend. Your Shopping Cart. . . ColorChip Road Rash Paint Chip Repair Kit Dupray Steam Cleaners Duragloss Automotive Appearance Products Eclipse Sun Shade The Edge Buffing Pads 1Z einszett German Car Care Products European License Plates Finish Kare FLEX Polishers Flitz Metal Polish, Fiberglass & Paint Restorer Foamaster Foam Wash Gun Free Bonus. . . Home. Detailing Guides. About Us. Newsletter. Brands. Customer Service. Home. Shop By Brand. Cquartz by CarPro Innovative Nano Coats. CarPro Fixer Polishing Compound 1 Liter CarPro Fixer Polishing Compound 1 Liter. . CarPro Fixer Polishing Compound is a one-step polishing compound made for any kind of paint surface: freshly painted, soft, hard and new ceramic scratch resistant paint. CarPro Fixer Polishing Compound is perfect for prepping your paintwo...
http://superiorcarcare.net/carpro-fixer-compound-liter.html
*  Color (C-41) Fixer
Color C-41 Fixer. Photocentric Ltd. Network - APUG.ORG. DPUG.ORG. Hybridphoto.com - Terms of Service. Privacy Policy. Contact Us. Members: 76,981 Posts: 1,696,235 Online: 869. No Account. Click Here. Remember Me. Forum. FAQ. Today's Posts. Subscribed Threads. My Threads. My Posts. Calendar. Spy. Mark Forums Read. Groups. Blogs. Gallery. Portfolios. Chat. Articles. Videos. Classifieds. Support Us. Mobile. Advanced Search. Forum. APUG English Forums. Darkroom. Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry. Color C-41 Fixer. Latest Photo. Mom and Daughter by ColColt. Enter the Gallery. Recent Classifieds. FS: Norman Studio Barn Doors 1 Author: mds721 0 view s. Beautiful USA Made Entry Level Author: jimgalli 93 view s. Beautiful USA Made Entry Level Author: jimgalli 91 view s. Doran Darkroom Light Tight fan Author: ParkerSmithPhoto 74 view s. Mamiya TLR 250 mm F/ 6.3 lens, Author: Ron789 66 view s. Recent Articles. Benchtop Photolithography for Author: Mustafa Umut Sarac 245 view s. Leica Lens Glass Tint, Anomalo Author: Mus...
http://apug.org/forums/forum40/114448-color-c-41-fixer.html
*  Dry and wet deposition of nutrients from the tropical Atlantic atmosphere: Links to primary product
... ivity and nitrogen fixation - NERC Open Research Archive. NERC Staff Login. Dry and wet deposition of nutrients from the tropical Atlantic atmosphere: Links to primary productivity and nitrogen fixation. Tools Tools Tools. RDF+XML BibTeX RDF+N-Triples JSON RefWorks Dublin Core Simple Metadata Refer METS Simple Metadata iShare HTML Citation ASCII Citation OpenURL ContextObject EndNote Dublin Core iShare OpenURL ContextObject in Span MODS MPEG-21 DIDL EP3 XML Reference Manager RDF+N3 Multiline CSV. N 2007 Dry and wet deposition of nutrients from the tropical Atlantic atmosphere: Links to primary productivity and nitrogen fixation. Slideshow Figures from published paper DSR54 1704 2007 figures.ppt Restricted to NORA staff only Download 332kB. Text Final submitted text separate file for figures DSR54 1704 2007.doc Restricted to NORA staff only Download 276kB. Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr.2007.07.001 Abstract/Summary Atmospheric deposition fluxes of soluble nutrients N, P, Si, Fe, Co, Zn to th...
http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/1019/
*  .. The Fixer .. The Fixer .. Share this: .. Like this:
the fixer the fixer become a fan new ronin entertainment is proud to present our first television production the fixer based on the lawson vampire novels by jon f merz called james bond with fangs the fixer tells the story of lawson a cynical jaded part cop spy commando divinely chosen from birth to help protect the balance the line separating humanity and the race of living vampires that has evolved in secret alongside humans over thousands of years called upon to protect his race by rooting out rogues criminals terrorists and ne er do wells lawson dispenses justice with extreme prejudice sarcasm by the bowlful and bullets by the pound lawson s area of operations ao is boston and new england but his previous missions have taken him all over the world what makes the fixer so unique and utterly cool unlike every other vampire story the vampires in lawson s world are not undead they re members of a separately evolving race that has existed in secret for thousands of years they have their own society carefully i...
http://jonfmerz.net/producer/new-ronin-entertainment/the-fixer/
*  spent fixer poll revisited 3 years later
... Benchtop Photolithography for Author: Mustafa Umut Sarac 241 view s. Wet Plate Collodion Silver Iod Author: Mustafa Umut Sarac 326 view s. View Poll Results: what do you do with your spent fixer. pour down the drain. Thread: spent fixer poll revisited 3 years later. Join Date Jan 2005 Location Live Free or Die Shooter Multi Format Posts 4,974 Images. Adv Reply. Reply w/quote. Join Date Jun 2003 Shooter Multi Format Posts 18,542 Blog Entries 16 Images. Join Date Jan 2010 Location Pennsylvania, USA Shooter Multi Format Posts 1,628. Perhaps those of you who take their fixer to a hazmat facilitly could comment on my concern, which is that the hazmat people don't really know what to do with used fixer. Join Date Jan 2010 Location Pennsylvania, USA Shooter Multi Format Posts 1,628. Wash off the Silver Magnet cell with clear water, dry it and put it away for the next time you want to use it. The first time I used the Silver Magnet, it took a little over a week to pull all the silver out of 2-1/2 gallons of used...
http://apug.org/forums/forum37/103658-spent-fixer-poll-revisited-3-years-later-3.html
*  Garden Dictionary Word: nitrogen fixation
Encyclopedia Seeds Forums Plant Finder Videos Search Like us or follow Articles Alpine Garden Annual Garden Bog Garden Bulbs Chihuly Garden Catalogs Compost Common Names Container Garden Dry Garden Easy Veggie Garden Encyclopedia Fence Designs Greenhouse Garden Blog Garden Forums Garden Fountains Garden Designs Garden Guide Garden Plans Garden Videos Garden Words Gardening Tips Garden Webcam Hardiness Zones Herb Garden How to Garden Insects Lawn Care My Garden Perennial Garden Plant Buddy Plant Disease Plant Finder Plant Info Plant This! Poems & Verses Propagation Pumpkins Rose Garden Potting Soil Mix Organic Garden Seeds Shade Garden Trees Tomatoes Vegetable Garden Water Garden Donations Please Campfire Songs Search Reference Garden Dictionary Word: nitrogen fixation nitrogen fixation The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen into an organic form usable by plants and other organisms. This can be through the agency of soil microorganisms, particularly rhizobia living in nodules on the roots of legumes , or b...
http://backyardgardener.com/gardendictionary/nitrogen_fixation.html
*  CH391L/S13/Refactoring Operons - OpenWetWare
However, through a process known as “refactoring,” gene clusters can be recoded to systematically eliminate native regulation cite Temme2012 /cite. This term was first applied in biology to describe the top-down approach of simplifying the phage cite Chan2005 /cite, but it is used here to refer to the bottom-up approach of eliminating native regulation of gene clusters and replacing it with synthetic genetic parts and circuits cite Temme2012 /cite. However, through a process known as “refactoring,” gene clusters can be recoded to systematically eliminate native regulation cite Temme2012 /cite. This term was first applied in biology to describe the top-down approach of simplifying the phage cite Chan2005 /cite, but it is used here to refer to the bottom-up approach of eliminating native regulation of gene clusters and replac it with synthetic genetic parts and circuits. cite Temme2012 /cite. The resulting gene cluster is a set of discrete genetic parts free of native regulation cite Temme2012 /cite. + The desi...
http://openwetware.org/index.php?title=CH391L/S13/Refactoring_Operons&diff=693170&oldid=691519
*  Ilford IF-2 Acid-hypo Fixer
... Photocentric Ltd. Network - APUG.ORG. DPUG.ORG. Hybridphoto.com - Terms of Service. Privacy Policy. Contact Us. Members: 76,978 Posts: 1,696,221 Online: 886. No Account. Click Here. Remember Me. Forum. FAQ. Today's Posts. Subscribed Threads. My Threads. My Posts. Calendar. Spy. Mark Forums Read. Groups. Blogs. Gallery. Portfolios. Chat. Articles. Videos. Classifieds. Support Us. Mobile. Advanced Search. Articles. Recipes. Fixers. Ilford IF-2 Acid-hypo Fixer. Latest Photo. Mom and Daughter by ColColt. Enter the Gallery. Recent Classifieds. Beautiful USA Made Entry Level Author: jimgalli 52 view s. Beautiful USA Made Entry Level Author: jimgalli 53 view s. Doran Darkroom Light Tight fan Author: ParkerSmithPhoto 50 view s. Mamiya TLR 250 mm F/ 6.3 lens, Author: Ron789 54 view s. FS: Kodak Expired 120 Ektachro Author: mds721 75 view s. Recent Articles. Benchtop Photolithography for Author: Mustafa Umut Sarac 244 view s. Leica Lens Glass Tint, Anomalo Author: Mustafa Umut Sarac 490 view s. Michelangelo - Sist...
http://apug.org/forums/forum226/87725-ilford-if-2-acid-hypo-fixer.html
*  Nitrogen-fixing bacteria
nitrogen fixing bacteria nitrogen fixing bacteria redirect nitrogen fixation biological nitrogen fixation...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen-fixing_bacteria
*  When should I use new fixer?
When should I use new fixer. Photocentric Ltd. Network - APUG.ORG. DPUG.ORG. Hybridphoto.com - Terms of Service. Privacy Policy. Contact Us. Members: 76,983 Posts: 1,696,263 Online: 798. No Account. Click Here. Remember Me. Forum. FAQ. Today's Posts. Subscribed Threads. My Threads. My Posts. Calendar. Spy. Mark Forums Read. Groups. Blogs. Gallery. Portfolios. Chat. Articles. Videos. Classifieds. Support Us. Mobile. Advanced Search. Forum. APUG English Forums. Darkroom. B W: Film, Paper, Chemistry. When should I use new fixer. Latest Photo. Two conchs by Peter Rockstroh01. Enter the Gallery. Recent Classifieds. FS: Norman Studio Barn Doors 1 Author: mds721 38 view s. Beautiful USA Made Entry Level Author: jimgalli 140 view s. Beautiful USA Made Entry Level Author: jimgalli 132 view s. Doran Darkroom Light Tight fan Author: ParkerSmithPhoto 99 view s. Mamiya TLR 250 mm F/ 6.3 lens, Author: Ron789 86 view s. Recent Articles. Benchtop Photolithography for Author: Mustafa Umut Sarac 245 view s. Leica Lens Glass Ti...
http://apug.org/forums/forum37/99175-when-should-i-use-new-fixer.html
*  TF-4 Fixer Life
... Network - APUG.ORG. DPUG.ORG. Hybridphoto.com - Terms of Service. Privacy Policy. Contact Us. Members: 76,959 Posts: 1,695,827 Online: 864. Remember Me. Forum. FAQ. Today's Posts. Subscribed Threads. My Threads. My Posts. Mark Forums Read. Blogs. Gallery. Portfolios. Articles. Classifieds. Support Us. Mobile. Advanced Search. Forum. APUG English Forums. Darkroom. TF-4 Fixer Life. Latest Photo. Enter the Gallery. Recent Classifieds. Leica 50mm Summicron V4 Author: nanthor 79 view s. FS: Darkroom Clear Out - Time Author: bjsmith7474 143 view s. FS: Leica 35mm Summicron Versi Author: Nathan King 90 view s. FS: Hasselblad, Nikon, Zeiss, Author: Barlow 99 view s. FS AGFA NEWSFILM graphic fil Author: kubakoziol 79 view s. Recent Articles. Benchtop Photolithography for Author: Mustafa Umut Sarac 235 view s. Leica Lens Glass Tint, Anomalo Author: Mustafa Umut Sarac 440 view s. Michelangelo - Sistine Chapel Author: Mustafa Umut Sarac 461 view s. Divided Attention Author: Bill Burk 827 view s. Wet Plate Collodion ...
http://apug.org/forums/forum37/5135-tf-4-fixer-life-2.html
*  10+ years old fixer does work
... Photocentric Ltd. Network - APUG.ORG. DPUG.ORG. Hybridphoto.com - Terms of Service. Privacy Policy. Contact Us. Members: 76,993 Posts: 1,696,388 Online: 1118. No Account. Click Here. Remember Me. Forum. FAQ. Today's Posts. Subscribed Threads. My Threads. My Posts. Calendar. Spy. Mark Forums Read. Groups. Blogs. Gallery. Portfolios. Chat. Articles. Videos. Classifieds. Support Us. Mobile. Advanced Search. Forum. APUG English Forums. Darkroom. B W: Film, Paper, Chemistry. 10+ years old fixer does work. Latest Photo. Window Shopper by n2mf. Enter the Gallery. Recent Classifieds. FS: Norman Studio Barn Doors 1 Author: mds721 86 view s. Beautiful USA Made Entry Level Author: jimgalli 248 view s. Beautiful USA Made Entry Level Author: jimgalli 220 view s. Doran Darkroom Light Tight fan Author: ParkerSmithPhoto 190 view s. Mamiya TLR 250 mm F/ 6.3 lens, Author: Ron789 131 view s. Recent Articles. Benchtop Photolithography for Author: Mustafa Umut Sarac 248 view s. Leica Lens Glass Tint, Anomalo Author: Mustafa ...
http://apug.org/forums/forum37/126161-10-years-old-fixer-does-work.html
*  ESET Papras Fixer Download - Softpedia
... SOFTPEDIA. DESKTOP. Windows Windows. Games. Drivers. Mac. Linux. MOBILE Phones. Tablets. Android. iOS. Windows Phone. WEB Webscripts. Web Browsers. Softpedia. Windows. Antivirus. Removal Tools. ESET Papras Fixer. ESET Papras Fixer DOWNLOAD NOW 162 KB. 303 downloads. 1.0.0.1 100% CLEAN. Freeware. A lightweight application that was made to help users get rid of the Papras malware that steals sensitive information from infected systems. description download 1 specifications. Keeping the PC clean from any threats involves the use of powerful antivirus solutions, but even if one such tool is installed, the more recent viruses might infiltrate onto the computer. In case one such infection occurs, it is vital that the user can find the proper removal utility and deploy it to clean the system. ESET Papras Fixer is one such application and it targets a specific malware that is quite dangerous because its goal is to leak sensitive information from the infected PC. The Papras trojan allows the attacker to gain acce...
http://softpedia.com/get/Antivirus/Removal-Tools/ESET-Papras-Fixer.shtml
*  Nitrogen Fixation by US and Middle Eastern Chickpeas with Commercial and Wild Middle Eastern Inocula
... : Table 1. Table 1: Mean*  % N fixation, above-ground biomass AGB, below-ground biomass BGB, and seed weight in chickpeas....
http://hindawi.com/journals/isrn/2012/981842/tab1/
*  News
... We use cookies to enhance your visit. By continuing to browse you are agreeing to our use of cookies. About Our Cookies. English Home / Hafan Gymraeg. News. Fixers. Issues. On TV. About. Join Fixers Join Newsletter. Become a Fixer. Become Corporate Partner. Become Community Partner. Become Individual Partner. 17.3k. Love your locks and celebrate your style. Onyi urges women to embrace their natural hair. Click to find out more. Got a question about eating disorders. Click here to find everything you need to know on our new, dedicated site... Anorexia undoubtedly can be cured in the majority of cases. Hear from the experts. Visit our eating disorders site. AWARD ON TOUR. Fixers National Lottery Award has become the competition s most well travelled silverware. Fixers need your support. Click here to donate and fund future Fixers. News. Posted On: 11th Nov 2013 The Power of Love. Fixers Stephen jump for joy at event. Fixer Stephen spreading the positive message. Fixer giving out free hugs. Not letting a di...
http://fixers.org.uk/index.php?module_instance_id=11208&core_alternate_io_handler=view_news&data_ref_id=7895
*  Imaging supplies
Excellent Scratch Resistant. Excellent Dimensional Stability Characteristics. DIAZO PHOTOTOOLS. Excellent dimensional stability Characteristics. NGS -- Diazo Films. LPI-7M Same excellent characteristics as LPI. WHITE CLEAN ROOM VINYL #FS-5-22 22 x28 50 per case #FS-5-20 27 x20 50 per case #FS-5 27 x 23 50 per case #FS-4 25 x 20 100 per case #FS-4-23 23 x 20 100 per case. WHITE PAPER BOARD #NGS-6 30 x 24 50 per case #NGS-5 27 x 23 50 per case #NGS-4 25 x 20 100 per case #NGS-4-23 23 x 20 100 per case. Allied Products: Rapid Access Developer Laser-14 Developer 4x5 quart / carton Mixes 1 part concentrate to 2 parts water Fixer w/Hardener XHF-147 Fixer w/hardener 4x1 gallon Fixer with 4x1 pint hardner per carton. / carton #29026 Fixer Systems Cleaner 4 x 1/2 Gal. / carton. Konica Products: Rapid Access Developer #860 Developer 2.5 gallon cube or 4x1 gallon / carton. / carton Fixer w/Hardener #841 Fixer w/hardener 4x1 gallon fixer with 4x1 pint hardener / carton. Fuji Products: Rapid Access Developer Forte' HQ Dev...
http://fdrspecialproducts.com/imaging.html
*  The Fixer Uppers
... 'The Fixer Uppers' is a 1935 short film starring Laurel and Hardy, directed by Charles Rogers and produced by Hal Roach. Plot Cast Notes References External links. Plot. Christmas card salesman Stan and Ollie are persuaded to help a woman Mae Busch spice up her loveless marriage by making her husband jealous. The spouse involved, a temperamental artist played by Charles Middleton, is however made rather too jealous for comfort, and puts Ollie in peril when he challenges him to a duel to the death at midnight and pledges to track him "to the end of the world" if he does not show up. Stan and Ollie discuss the challenge in a nearby bar and it occurs to them that the husband cannot know where they live, so Ollie complacently telephones him to inform him he will not be there and they both insult him. They then get drunk with a neighbor of the couple played by Arthur Housman. They are discovered when Stan starts snoring and pistols are produced but the wife tells Ollie she has replaced the bullets with blanks...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fixer_Uppers
*  Klebsiella
'Klebsiella' is a genus of nonmotile, Gram-negative, oxidase-negative, rod-shaped bacteria with a prominent polysaccharide -based capsule. This is thought to be due to distinct sublineages developing specific niche adaptations, with associated biochemical adaptations which make them better suited to a particular environment. They can be found in water, soil, plants, insects, animals, and humans. 2 List of species of the genus 'Klebsiella' Features 'Klebsiella' in humans 'Klebsiella' in plants See also References External links. List of species of the genus 'Klebsiella'. p.' subsp. p.' subsp. p.' subsp. q.' subsp. q.' subsp. 3 'Klebsiella' in humans. 'Klebsiella' species are routinely found in the human nose, mouth, and gastrointestinal tract as normal flora; however, they can also behave as opportunistic human pathogens. 4 'Klebsiella' species are known to also infect a variety of other animals, both as normal flora and opportunistic pathogens. pneumoniae' is the most common cause of nosocomial respiratory tr...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klebsiella
*  Browse by Person - InterNano Nanomanufacturing Library
browse by person internano nanomanufacturing library advanced search browse collections document type latest additions person taxonomy year deposit an item about the library internano login create account browse by person up a level export as ascii citation bibtex dublin core ep xml endnote html citation json mets object ids openurl contextobject rdf n triples rdf n rdf xml refer reference manager atom rss rss number of items cherchi carla and gu april z impact of titanium dioxide nanomaterials on nitrogen fixation rate and intracellular nitrogen storage inanabaena variabilis environmental science technology p issn x this list was generated on sun oct edt this project is supported by the national science foundation under grant no cmmi center for hierarchical manufacturing internano nanomanufacturing library is powered by eprints which is developed by the school of electronics and computer science at the university of southampton more information and software credits...
http://eprints.internano.org/view/person/Cherchi=3ACarla=3A=3A.html
*  Did b+w prints (it's been 20 years) QUESTIONS
Advanced Search. 2 Safelights....I have the red one....i read on the Ilford paper I have to use the amber/brown one....I had no choice....prints seem to be fine....any comments. 5 Resin coated paper ILFORD - fix times 1 min and wash times 1 min....thats what they say.....do you guys use more time?. Adv Reply. Reply w/quote. 5 I fix for 1.5m and wash a lot longer than one minute. Join Date Apr 2006 Location Michigan Shooter Multi Format Posts 757. 2 Safelights....I have the red one....i read on the Ilford paper I have to use the amber/brown one....I had no choice....prints seem to be fine....any comments. Basically, the amber safelights emit light further into the green range than do red safelights, which means they can fog some variable contrast VC papers. 5 Resin coated paper ILFORD - fix times 1 min and wash times 1 min....thats what they say.....do you guys use more time?. Some fixers, such as TF-4, work very quickly and have very short fix times 1 minute or less. You get short wash times with alkaline fix...
http://apug.org/forums/forum41/61927-did-b-w-prints-its-been-20-years-questions.html
*  genlib/roundrobin: fix n==1 case (correctly) · m-labs/migen@6e11954 · GitHub
genlib/roundrobin: fix n==1 case correctly · m-labs/migen@6e11954 · GitHub. Skip to content. Sign up Sign in. This repository. Explore. Features. Enterprise. Pricing. Watch. 26. Star. 156. Fork. 34. m-labs. / migen. Code Issues. Pull requests. Pulse Graphs HTTPS clone URL. Subversion checkout URL. You can clone with. . HTTPS or. . Subversion. Download ZIP. Permalink. Browse files genlib/roundrobin: fix n==1 case correctly. Loading branch information ... commit 6e1195415e29958a430f379584a1366d53f07bca. 1 parent b8ff2f2. jordens authored Jul 26, 2013. sbourdeauducq committed Jul 26, 2013. Unified. Split. Showing 1 changed file with 1 addition and 1 deletion. +1. −1.   . migen/genlib/roundrobin.py. Show notes. View. 2   . migen/genlib/roundrobin.py. @@ -5,7 +5,7 @@. class RoundRobin Module :. def init self, n, switch policy = SP WITHDRAW :. self .request = Signal n. - self .grant = Signal max = max 1, n. + self .grant = Signal ma...
https://github.com/m-labs/migen/commit/6e1195415e29958a430f379584a1366d53f07bca
*  Nitrogen-fixing trees
nitrogen fixing trees nitrogen fixing trees redirect nitrogen fixation...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen-fixing_trees
*  Nitrogen-fixing
nitrogen fixing nitrogen fixing redirect nitrogen fixation...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen-fixing
*  henrikbjorn/GravatarBundle · GitHub
... Skip to content. Sign up Sign in. This repository. Explore. Features. Enterprise. Pricing. Watch. 9. Star. 100. Fork. 27. henrikbjorn. / GravatarBundle. Code Issues. Pull requests. Pulse Graphs HTTPS clone URL. Subversion checkout URL. You can clone with. . HTTPS or. . Subversion. Download ZIP. Simple wrapper to gravatar API for Symfony2 - Provides a configurable service and a template helper. http://knpbundles.com/henrikbjorn/GravatarBundle. 118 commits. 1 branch. 5 releases. 22 contributors. PHP 99.6%. Makefile 0.4%. PHP Makefile. Branch: master. Switch branches/tags. Branches. Tags. master. Nothing to show. 1.1.3. 1.1.2. 1.1.1. 1.1.0. 1.0.0. Nothing to show. GravatarBundle. / Merge pull request #40 from alister/feature/profiles. …. Gravatar Profile URL support. latest commit 735c520dcd. henrikbjorn authored Oct 2, 2015. Permalink. Failed to load latest commit information. DependencyInjection. CS fixer apply. Sep 2, 2015. Resources/ config. changed namespace to ornicar. Aug 23, 2011. Templating/ Helper...
https://github.com/henrikbjorn/GravatarBundle
*  "fixing" nitrogen
fixing nitrogen fixing nitrogen redirect nitrogen fixation...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/"fixing"_nitrogen
*  Fixing nitrogen
... redirect nitrogen fixation...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fixing_nitrogen
*  Nitrogen fixating
... redirect nitrogen fixation...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen_fixating
*  Nitrogen fixing
... redirect nitrogen fixation...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen_fixing
*  Post #1489640
post pm htf iii join date apr shooter multi format posts originally posted by gerald c koch if the working solution was cloudy then it is beginning to sulfurize nothing can be done to save it and it is best to chuck it the sulfur that is being formed will stick to film and prints and cannot be removed sorry thank you for your reply when i saw it i went it and looked at the bottle of fixer that has sat idle for several days now so i have a new question the cloudiness has settled to the bottom of the jug if i poured off the clear what would i have would it be fixer or just some unknown solution stripped of its constituant chemical of no use at all adv reply reply w quote...
http://apug.org/forums/viewpost.php?p=1489640
*  Nitrogen 14
nitrogen nitrogen redirect isotopes of nitrogen nitrogen...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen_14
*  Nitrogen 15
nitrogen nitrogen redirect isotopes of nitrogen nitrogen...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen_15
*  Biological role of nitrogen
... redirect nitrogen biological role...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_role_of_nitrogen
*  Nitrogen rule (with regard to Mass Spec)
nitrogen rule with regard to mass spec nitrogen rule with regard to mass spec redirect nitrogen rule...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen_rule_(with_regard_to_Mass_Spec)
*  File:Nitrogen elimination.jpg
file nitrogen elimination jpg file nitrogen elimination jpg summary licensing...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen_elimination.jpg
*  Article: Original Q&A about Nitrogen - Who Posted?
article original q a about nitrogen who posted total posts who posted posts agd show thread close window...
http://automags.org/forums/misc.php?do=whoposted&t=264547
*  Terra Nitrogen About To Put More Money In Your Pocket (TNH)
Terra Nitrogen About To Put More Money In Your Pocket TNH. false....
http://forbes.com/sites/dividendchannel/2012/11/12/terra-nitrogen-about-to-put-more-money-in-your-pocket-tnh/?ss=investing
*  EXPLORE SCIENTIFIC 20MM 100° NITROGEN-PURGED WATERPROOF EYEPIECE
explore scientific mm nitrogen purged waterproof eyepiece...
http://eyepiecesetc.com/EXPLORE_SCIENTIFIC_20MM_100_WATERPROOF_EYEPIECE_p/2101200.htm
*  Mephitic
... redirect nitrogen history...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mephitic
*  Microsaccade
'Microsaccades' are a kind of fixational eye movement. They are small, jerk-like, involuntary eye movements, similar to miniature versions of voluntary saccade s. They typically occur during prolonged visual fixation of at least several seconds, not only in humans, but also in animals with fovea l vision primates, cats, etc. Microsaccade amplitudes vary from 2 to 120 arcminute s. The first empirical evidence for their existence was provided by Robert Darwin, the father of Charles Darwin. Function. The role of microsaccades in visual perception has been a highly debated topic that is still largely unresolved. It has been proposed that microsaccades correct displacements in eye position produced by drifts, although non-corrective microsaccades also occur. Microsaccades were also believed to prevent the retina l image from fading, but they do not occur often enough for that purpose, considering that perfectly stabilized images can disappear from perception in a few seconds or less. The current consensus is that ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsaccade
*  Complement Fixation Test
The complement of most species will react with antibody derived from other species and guinea pig serum is a common laboratory source of complement. To overcome this effect indicator system used to identify the complement fixation. So, In complement fixation test, two system generally used, one is test system which contain sample to be tested and indicator system which signals the complement fixation which is usually an erythrocytes coated with antibodies. Complement fixation test might be used to detect the presence of either antibody or antigen. Test system sample , antigens and complements are first mixed and after a period of incubation, the indicator system, and antibody coated sheep erythrocytes, are added. Then complements fixed during the incubation period and will not available to lyse the red cells. In negative test, there will no antibody for the formation of Ag-ab complex, therefore no complement fixation. Antigens or antibodies and complements should be in Minimum Hemolytic Dose HMD level. One un...
http://biosiva.50webs.org/compft.htm
*  Complement fixation test
... The 'complement fixation test' is an immunological medical test that can be used to detect the presence of either specific antibody or specific antigen in a patient's serum. Process Testing for antigen Quantitative testing References External links. The complement system is a system of serum proteins that react with antigen-antibody complexes. If this reaction occurs on a cell surface, it will result in the formation of trans-membrane pores and therefore destruction of the cell. The basic steps of a complement fixation test are as follows: http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072556781/student view0/chapter31/animation quiz 4.html. To negate any effects this might have on the test, the complement proteins in the patient's serum must be destroyed and replaced by a known amount of standardized complement proteins. The antigen of interest is added to the serum. If the patient's serum contains antibodies against the antigen of interest, they will bind to the antigen in step 3 to form antigen-antibody compl...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complement_fixation_test
*  Search Results
... Journals. Enter Your Search:. Search tips Search criteria. Articles Journal titles. Author Journal Title Publication Date Relevance. Previous Page Go to page number:. Clipboard 0. Journals The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine. Authors Armstrong, John A. 1 Dowling, John N. 1 Ho, Monto 1 Lucas, John P. 1 Saslow, Arnold R. 1 Tarr, George C. 1 Youngblood, Leona A. Cytomegalovirus Infection in Children Undergoing Open-Heart Surgery 1. Armstrong, John A. Tarr, George C. Youngblood, Leona A. Dowling, John N. Saslow, Arnold R. Lucas , John P. Ho, Monto The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine 1976;49 1 :83-91. A group of 124 children undergoing open-heart surgery was followed prospectively in order to estimate the risk of cytomegalovirus CMV infection due to transfused blood. Ninety-three patients 75% had complement fixation CF titers of < 1:4 against CMV on admission. Of this seronegative subgroup, nine patients 9.7% subsequently became infected with CMV. This infection rate was consistent with a model of t...
http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/solr/reg?term=author:("Lucas, John A.")&filterQuery=journal_str:The\ Yale\ Journal\ of\ Biology\ and\ Medicine&sortby=score desc
*  Davidson's Clinical Cases by Mark Strachan — Reviews, Discussion, Bookclubs, Lists
... . register. tour. sign in. Home. My Books. Friends. Recommendations. Explore. Genres. Listopia. Giveaways. Choice Awards. Popular. Goodreads Voice. Ebooks. Fun. Trivia. Quizzes. Quotes. Community. Groups. Creative Writing. People. Events. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking “Davidson's Clinical Cases” as Want to Read:. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read. Currently Reading. Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Want to Read saving…. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Rate this book. Clear rating. 1 of 5 stars 2 of 5 stars 3 of 5 stars 4 of 5 stars 5 of 5 stars. Open Preview. See a Problem. We’d love your help. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of Davidson's Clinical Cases by Mark Strachan. Problem: It’s the wrong book It’s the wrong edition Other. Details if other :. Cancel and return to book page. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Not the book you’re looking for. Preview — Davidson's Clinical Cases by Mark Strachan. Davidso...
http://goodreads.com/book/show/2922899-davidson-s-clinical-cases
*  Re: accepted fixation protocols
... Previous Message. From: Tim Morken timcdc@hotmail.com To: HistoNet@Pathology.swmed.edu Reply-To:. Judy, The use of fluorescent tags predates the use of the enzyme-chromogen systems we use today in paraffin. Using a fluorescent-tagged primary antibody was the most efficient and easiest method at the time and still is in many cases. Antibody avidity and sensitivity is better on non-formalin-fixed tissue and the fluorescent tag is quite sensitive. Fixation of tissue with formalin will cause some problems with autofluorescence so fluorescent tags are usually used on frozen sections. Since your tissues are already fixed, however, you may as well go to a multi-step system, which will give you more sensitivity and a more options for detection. Something you can try is to use a system in which you use a secondary anti-FITC or whatever fluorecein you are using and then a third step of either a biotinylated antibody or PAP to get an amplified link you may be able to use a biotinylated link on the primary but somet...
http://histosearch.com/histonet/Mar99A/Re.acceptedfixationprotoc.html
*  in situ on methacarn vs formalin fixed tissue
... from brand karl k brand pmci unimelb edu au histonet i have been refining a dig ish protocol on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue over many years and have excellent results thus far i am now considering applying this protocol to methacarn fixed tissue any suggestions in simplifying this transition would be greatly appreciated ultimately parity in ish staining between the two differently fixed specimens is the goal thanks karl karl brand k brand pmci unimelb edu au tissue array facility the peter maccallum cancer institute centre for cancer genomics and predictive medicine st andrews place east melbourne australia ph fax mob previous message next message...
http://histosearch.com/histonet/Apr01/insituonmethacarnvsformal.html
*  Re: formalin fixation of tissues for immuno's, research
... From: Cathy Gorrie. Dear Kathy, As always, each antibody will have it's own particular requirements. I do a lot of immuno on human brain which has been fixed for at least two weeks in strong formalin, and often don't need any type of antigen retreival. On the other hand there are many antibodies I can never use because the antigens are so sensitive to formalin fixation. Are you parafin embedding. or cutting frozen sections after fixation. We do a minimum of fixation 2 hours post fix after perfusion of rats for frozen sections because they usually have more sensitive antigens involved. Everything is dependent on the antibody you are using or the antigen you are trying to visualise. You need to do very careful research when selecting the antibody. make sure to get the manufacturers specification sheets that say very clearly it works on formalin fixation parafin embedded tissue, and they should also tell you if you need antigen retreival. Also try and find out if other people are using this antibody on simi...
http://histosearch.com/histonet/Dec01/Re.formalinfixationoftiss.html
*  Perfusion fixation of large arteries - General Lab Techniques - BioForum
... Jump to content. Google Sign in options. Remember me This is not recommended for shared computers Sign in anonymously Don't add me to the active users list Privacy Policy. Sign In. Create Account. Search Advanced. Search section:. This topic. Forums. Members. BioBlog. BioWiki. Interest Groups. Calendar. Quotes. BioVideo. View New Content. Protocol Online. Forums. BioBlog. BioWiki. Interest Groups. Calendar. Quotes. Contact Us. BioForum. Protocols and Techniques Forums. General Lab Techniques. Javascript Disabled Detected You currently have javascript disabled. Please re-enable javascript to access full functionality. Perfusion fixation of large arteries Started by. Keno, Jul 28 2014 08:07 PM perfusion fixation. artery. Please log in to reply. 1 reply to this topic #1. Keno. Keno. member Members. 1 posts. My study involves implantation of a vascular graft in sheep carotid arteries. I'm planning the explantation of these grafts and I see from other similar studies that perfusion fixation is often used. My ...
http://protocol-online.org/forums/topic/32847-perfusion-fixation-of-large-arteries/
*  Sean Davis
... add/edit. You are here: Scientific Experts USA. National Institutes of Health Davis Sean Davis. Research Topics programming languages computers software computer graphics gene expression profiling genome factual databases computational biology genetic databases statistical data interpretation information storage and retrieval cluster analysis genomics oligonucleotide array sequence analysis algorithms sulfates gene conversion paraffin embedding tissue fixation mutagenesis dna methylation cell cycle cell differentiation protein binding cell proliferation prostatic neoplasms serine endopeptidases tumor cell line dogs osteosarcoma. Genomes and Genes BCL2L12. products. Kit. products. Mitf. products. Cdkn2a. products. MEN1. products. KMT2A. products. RBBP5. products. TRRAP. products. HK2. products. GRIN2A. products. Thrb. products. Ifng. products. Ccr5. products. Ccr2. products. IGF1. products. Species human mouse dog. Sean Davis Summary Affiliation: National Institutes of Health Country: USA. Publications RC...
http://labome.org/expert/usa/national/davis/sean-davis-1104234.html
*  Paraffin Tissue Microarray
Human Common Normal Tissue Microarray, 38 cores 2 mm 38 cases from 19 tissues, buffered formalin fixation MNO381-2-PT 2 slides 280 DETAILS. Human Common Normal Tissue Microarray, 38 cores 2 mm 38 cases from 19 tissues, buffered formalin fixation MNO381-5-PT 5 slides 504 DETAILS. Human FDA Common Normal Tissue Microarray, 66 cores 1.5 mm, 33 tissue types based on the FDA recommendation for antibody cross-reactivity testing in duplicate, buffered formalin fixation MNO661-2-PT 2 slides 330 DETAILS. Human FDA Common Normal Tissue Microarray, 66 cores 1.5 mm, 33 tissue types based on the FDA recommendation for antibody cross-reactivity testing in duplicate, buffered formalin fixation MNO661-5-PT 5 slides 584 DETAILS. Human FDA Normal Tissue Microarray, 34 cores 1.5 mm 34 cases, tissues based on the FDA recommendation for antibody cross-reactivity testing buffered formalin fixation MNO341-2-PT 2 slides 184 DETAILS. Human FDA Normal Tissue Microarray, 34 cores 1.5 mm 34 cases, tissues based on the FDA recommendation...
http://biocat.com/tissue-related/human-adult-normal/paraffin-tissue-microarray
*  DNA extraction from formalin fixed tissue
... mr s m n n faruque sfaruque at crc ac uk fri feb est previous message help thermodyn data of phosphotyrosine tyrosine next message require d protein antibodies messages sorted by has anyone got any ideas about this i m trying to get dna from wax emmbeded brain but no luck so far for pcr i ve tried the nucleon i kit from scotlab got bp but i really need bigger dna do i de wax or not has anyone got a working protocol please reply to me via the board or e mail my friend sfaruque uk ac mrc crc i haven t sorted an account for myself yet stuart pickering brown division of neuroscience manchester university previous message help thermodyn data of phosphotyrosine tyrosine next message require d protein antibodies messages sorted by more information about the methods mailing list...
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/methods/1994-February/011670.html
*  RE: [Histonet] Lymphocytes antibodies - Fixed tissue
re lymphocytes antibodies fixed tissue re lymphocytes antibodies fixed tissue from patsy ruegg gabriel i use mouse monoclonal cd from lab vision for pan t cells on mouse tissue ffpe it should work great on frozen sections unfortunately the t subsets are not developed yet and work only on frozens so far patsy original message from histonet bounces lists utsouthwestern edu on behalf of marceau gabriel iaf laval sent tuesday june am to histonet lists utsouthwestern edu subject lymphocytes antibodies fixed tissue i hi everyone i am looking for antibodies against lymphocytes cd or other that will work on fixed tissue most of those comercially available are good for cytometry but none is marked as usable on paraformaldehyde fixed tissue if someone tried one that is not specified for fixed tissue and it worked please let me know if not is there a product out there that is said to be working in these conditions gabriel inrs institut armand frappier histonet mailing list histonet lists utsouthwestern edu http lists ut...
http://histosearch.com/histonet/Jun04/RE.HistonetLymphocytesantA.html
*  RE: [Histonet] TUNEL
Jerry, Could you expand on or give references to formalin causing DNA strand breaks. Double strand breaks, single strand, blunt end, overhanging. My pile of papers and having done TUNEL for years says that formalin fixation is a very good technique for TUNEL and many peer-reviewed articles in which TUNEL is used as a technique, use formalin fixation and how can that be if formalin is causing strand breaks. Even the use of the monoclonal antibody F7-26, for single stranded DNA, touts formalin fixation for their claims of discriminating apoptosis from necrosis. The question asks about extended alcohol fixation but your answer is possibly a lot of false positives because formalin causes DNA breaks. That's a > problem with TUNEL and formalin fixed tissue anyway--formalin causes DNA strand > breaks. Medicine at South Lake Union > 815 Mercer Street > Seattle, WA 98109 > 206 -685-7190> Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:42:32 +0200> From: > marijke.oste@ua.ac.be> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu> Subject: > TUNEL> > For...
http://histosearch.com/histonet/Aug07A/RE.HistonetTUNELB.html
*  [Histonet] Research Diagnstics CD 66
research diagnstics cd research diagnstics cd from melanie black hi there i am running an antibody from research diagnostics cd granulocyte marker has anybody had success with it on formalin fixed tissue and is so what antigen retrieval have you found to be successful i have had no problem with it on unfixed blood smears but no luck on fixed tissue my antibody is rdi cd b g f and is recommended for formalin fixed tissue with citrate pre treatment it also requires an igm secondary which i have used i have tries citrate buffer as well as trypsin any suggestions many thanks melanie black cardiovascular research unit div of cardiothoracic surgery chris barnard building university of cape town anzio road observatory republic of south africa tel cel fax histonet mailing list histonet lists utsouthwestern edu http lists utsouthwestern edu mailman listinfo histonet previous message next message...
http://histosearch.com/histonet/May04/HistonetResearchDiagnstic.html
*  Re: [Histonet] ER - fixation
re er fixation re er fixation from bryan hewlett hi annette i concur with richard s recommendation re the goldstein article however i should point out that the suggested minimum hours of fixation for er will only provide approximately confidence for a positive er result low level er expressers may still be missed depending upon your ihc system sensitivity in addition hours nbf fixation is way too short for reliable her staining and of course you may have to perform ihc for this marker on the same material hours fixation in nbf at rt or hours at c should be considered the minimum time for reliable ihc on breast tumours bryan r hewlett consultant technologist quality management program laboratory services ontario canada original message from richard cartun to sent monday june pm subject er fixation hello annette i could not reply to your original e mail regarding er and fixation see goldstein ns et al minimum formalin fixation time for consistent er ihc staining of invasive breast carcinoma am j clin pathol ric...
http://histosearch.com/histonet/Jun06/Re.HistonetER-fixation.html
*  [Histonet] cd5 and cd23 on B5 fixed tissue
cd and cd on b fixed tissue cd and cd on b fixed tissue from histology slu hello all is anyone doing these two antibodies on b fixed tissue with good results if you are and would be willing to share your secrets any info would be appreciated both of the vendors and a couple of others have not used these antibodies with b fixation as part of their qc procedures and can not help thanks in advance susan do you yahoo yahoo search presents jib jab s second term histonet mailing list histonet lists utsouthwestern edu http lists utsouthwestern edu mailman listinfo histonet previous message next message...
http://histosearch.com/histonet/Feb05A/Histonetcd5andcd23onB5fix.html
*  RE: [Histonet] TUNEL
RE: TUNEL. RE: TUNEL. From: JR R. I expect you will get a very high background--lots of false positives. That's a problem with TUNEL and formalin fixed tissue anyway--formalin causes DNA strand breaks. Jerry L. Ricks Research Scientist U.W. Medicine at South Lake Union 815 Mercer Street Seattle, WA 98109 206 -685-7190> Date: Fri, 31 Aug 2007 10:42:32 +0200> From: marijke.oste@ua.ac.be> To: histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu> Subject: TUNEL> > For staining the apoptotic cells I'm already using a kit of Roche> diagnostics. I think the greatest problem is that my tissues has been saved> for several years in ethanol 70%. Does anyone has experience in staining> tissues for apoptotic cells who are kept in ethanol for several years?> Thank you> > > > Histonet mailing list> Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu> http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet Explore the seven wonders of the world htt...
http://histosearch.com/histonet/Aug07A/RE.HistonetTUNELA.html
*  [Histonet] Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 52, Issue 4
Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 52, Issue 4. Re: Histonet Digest, Vol 52, Issue 4. From: MKing. Bryan and Tim, Thanks for excellent postsMK, this info will go in my tech folder. It looked like this thread was headed into a flame war, nice to have substantiated data prevail here. Mike King UF Pharmacology & Therapeutics -------------------- Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2008 10:56:18 -0500 From: Bryan Hewlett Subject: Re: Washing out formalin fixation Lengthy Histonet mailing list Histonet@lists.utsouthwestern.edu http://lists.utsouthwestern.edu/mailman/listinfo/histonet. Previous Message. Next Message....
http://histosearch.com/histonet/Mar08/HistonetRe.HistonetDigest.html
*  Ocular Hypertension
... Mission Statement. L ocated in Grossmont Shopping Center, La Mesa Call for an appointment 619 469-0131. Office Hours Location. Our Optical Staff. Our Eyewear Collection. Eye Health Questions. Ocular Hypertension Home \ Mission Statement \ Conditions \ Ocular Hypertension Ocular hypertension means the pressure in your eye, or your intraocular pressure IOP, is higher than normal levels. Elevated IOP is also associated with glaucoma, which is a more serious condition that causes vision loss and optic nerve damage. By itself, however, ocular hypertension doesn't damage your vision or eyes. Signs and symptoms of ocular hypertension You can't tell by yourself that you have ocular hypertension, because there are no outward signs or symptoms such as pain or redness. At each eye exam, your eyecare practitioner will measure your IOP and compare it to normal levels. What causes ocular hypertension. Anyone can develop ocular hypertension, but it's most common in African-Americans, people over 40, those w...
http://grossmontvisioncenteroptometry.com/ocular-hypertension
*  Ocular hypertension
... infobox disease name ocular hypertension image caption diseasesdb icd icd icd icdo omim medlineplus emedicinesubj oph emedicinetopic meshid d ocular hypertension is a clinical term describing the presence of elevated intraocular pressure in the absence of optic nerve damage or visual field loss for most individuals the normal range of introcular pressure is between mmhg and mmhg elevated intraocular pressure is an important risk factor for glaucoma the ocular hypertension treatment study a large multicentered randomized clinical trial determined that topical ocular hypotensive medication delays or prevents the onset of primary open angle glaucoma accordingly most individuals with consistently elevated intraocular pressures of greater than mmhg particularly if they have other risk factors are treated in an effort to prevent vision loss from glaucoma pathophysiology treatment references external links pathophysiology the pressure within the eye is maintained by the balance between the fluid that enters the...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocular_hypertension
*  Hypertension - Optos
... Hypertension Ocular hypertension overview The term ocular hypertension usually refers to any situation in which the pressure inside the eye, called intraocular pressure, is higher than normal. Ocular hypertension is an eye pressure of greater than 21 mm Hg. Who is at risk for ocular hypertension. Some studies suggest that women could be at a higher risk for ocular hypertension, especially after menopause. Studies also show that men with ocular hypertension may be at a higher risk for glaucomatous damage. What causes ocular hypertension. Elevated intraocular pressure is a concern in people with ocular hypertension because it is one of the main risk factors for glaucoma. Another way to think of high pressure inside the eye is to imagine a water balloon. The more water that is put into the balloon, the higher the pressure inside the balloon. Also, just like a water balloon can burst if too much water is put into it, the optic nerve in the eye can be damaged by too high of a pressure. What are the symptoms o...
http://optos.com/en-us/Patients/Eye-conditions/Hypertension/
*  Ocular Hypertension: When to Treat? | ConsultantLive
Ocular Hypertension: When to Treat. ConsultantLive. Skip to main content. Search For... Search. ConsultantLive SearchMedica. Topics: Atrial Fibrillation. Cardiovascular Diseases. COPD. Men s Health. Diabetes Type 2. Pain. HIV AIDS. Nervous System Diseases. Obesity. Respiratory Diseases. Browse All Topics All Topics Atrial Fibrillation Cardiovascular Diseases COPD Men's Health Diabetes Type 2 Pain HIV AIDS Nervous System Diseases Obesity Respiratory Diseases. MAIN MENU Home Topics Dermatology Cardiovascular Diabetes GI HIV/AIDS Conferences Quizzes Photoclinic Image IQ Pediatrics. Welcome Guest. Login or Register Welcome My Account. My Account or Logout. Connect to other sites within the UBM Medica Network. Search For... Search. ConsultantLive SearchMedica. Topics: Atrial Fibrillation. Cardiovascular Diseases. COPD. Men s Health. Diabetes Type 2. Pain. HIV AIDS. Nervous System Diseases. Obesity. Respiratory Diseases. Browse All Topics All Topics Atrial Fibrillation Cardiovascular Diseases COPD Men's Health Diab...
http://consultantlive.com/articles/ocular-hypertension-when-treat
*  Effects of Ocular Hypertension on Visual Brain Damage | BrightFocus Foundation
Effects of Ocular Hypertension on Visual Brain Damage. BrightFocus Foundation. BrightFocus Foundation About. Programs Leadership Partners Accountability Careers Research. Research We Fund Alzheimer’s Disease Research Program Macular Degeneration Research Program National Glaucoma Research Program Scientific Review Committees Notable Researchers Molecular Neurodegeneration Journal Grants. Programs Leadership Partners Accountability Careers Research. Research We Fund Alzheimer’s Disease Research Program Macular Degeneration Research Program National Glaucoma Research Program Scientific Review Committees Notable Researchers Molecular Neurodegeneration Journal Grants. Home Effects of Ocular Hypertension on Visual Brain Damage. Effects of Prolonged Eye Pressure Elevation on Visual Brain Changes. Kevin Chan, PhD University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA. Ian Conner, MD, PhD University of Pittsburgh. Effects of Ocular Hypertension on Visual Brain Damage. In addition, they will investigate the neuroprotective effects o...
http://brightfocus.org/glaucoma/grant/effects-ocular-hypertension-visual-brain-damage
*  Ernesto Strobbe
... add/edit. You are here: Scientific Experts Italy Strobbe Ernesto Strobbe. Research Topics palmitic acids intraocular pressure endocannabinoids ethanolamines choroid brachial artery aqueous humor ocular hypertension organ size vasodilation pilot projects visual acuity disease progression inflammation visual fields ophthalmic solutions immunologic factors mydriatics regional blood flow recombinant proteins angiogenesis inhibitors tropicamide pupil diabetic retinopathy postoperative period trabeculectomy enzyme linked immunosorbent assay tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 exfoliation syndrome retinal ganglion cells. Genomes and Genes endothelin 1. products. Species human. Ernesto Strobbe Summary Country: Italy. Publications Subtenon injection of natural leukocyte interferon α-2a in diabetic macular edema: a case report Mauro Cellini Department of Specialized, Diagnostic and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology Unit, University of Bologna, S, Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Pelagio Palagi 9, Bologna 40138, It...
http://labome.org/expert/italy/strobbe/ernesto-strobbe-1906911.html
*  Psych Central - Researchers show beneficial role of risk calculator in fighting progression of glauc
Quizzes News Experts Ask the Therapist Blogs Experts Daily News Research Updates World of Psychology Research Resources Find a clinical Trial Resources Forums Support Groups Find Help Ask the Therapist Drugs Medications Find a Therapist Psychotherapy 101 Forums Support Groups Take a Quiz Mood Tracker Pro. Home Conditions Quizzes Ask the Therapist Drugs Blogs News Research Resources Find Help Psychotherapy 101 Forums Support Groups Pro. A new glaucoma risk calculator, which estimates a patient's risk of converting from high eye pressure, or ocular hypertension, to glaucoma, will help physicians determine whether to initiate therapy for patients. "The glaucoma risk calculator is a tool which allows doctors to better assess patient risk levels and, if needed, recommend treatment options that can help decrease the progression of glaucoma in patients with ocular hypertension." The risk calculator model will be reported at the American Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting October 17 in Chicago, Ill., by Weinreb ...
http://psychcentral.com/news/archives/2005-10/uoc--rsb101405.html
*  Levobetaxolol
... drugbox verifiedfields changed verifiedrevid iupac name s phenoxy isopropylamino propanol hydrochloride image levobetaxolol structure svg image levobetaxolol fill png tradename drugs com pregnancy au pregnancy us c pregnancy category legal au legal uk legal us legal status routes of administration topical ophthalmic bioavailability protein bound metabolism elimination half life hours excretion iuphar ligand cas number ref stdinchikey nwiutzdmdhavtp krwdzbqosa n levobetaxolol is a drug used to lower the pressure in the eye in treating conditions such as glaucoma it is typically marketed as a ophthalmic solution of levobetaxolol hydrochloride under the trade name betaxon levobetaxolol is a beta adrenergic receptor inhibitor beta blocker effect levobetaxolol inhibits the beta adrenergic receptor when applied topically it reduces intra ocular pressure iop by depending on time of day and the individual it is indicated for iop reduction in patients with open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension levobetaxolol ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levobetaxolol
*  Eye Donation | Eye Clinic | Eye Destination | Best Eye Clinic in Jaipur
Eye Donation. Eye Clinic. Best Eye Clinic in Jaipur Home. Mission & Vision Why ED Refraction Comprehensive Eye Exam Contact Lens Consulting Low Vision Aids Kids Eye Care Ocularprothosis Squint Pediatric Eye Care Vision Therapy Eye Terms Eye Care Tips Common Eye problems Computer Vision Syndrome Diabetes & Eyes Kids Eye Care Work Ergonomics Eye Facts Eye Donation News Letter E-Consultation E-Appointments E-Query. Our Services Comprehensive Eye Exam. Contact Lens Consulting. Low Vision Aids. Kids Eye Care. Pediatric Eye Care. Vision Therapy Latest News. Contact Us A-9,10 Janta Store, Bapu Nagar, Jaipur Rajasthan. Eye Donation. 1.What is Eye Donation. The eye donation of the deceased can be authorized by the next of kith & kin even if the deceased did not pledge to donate his / her eyes before death. The front, clear and transparent tissue of the eye called as cornea can be used to restore vision to corneal blind person. 3.What is Corneal Blindness. This loss of the vision is referred as corneal blindness. 4.Wha...
http://eyedestination.com/clinic/Eye-Donation.aspx
*  Eye Liners | Eye Pencils | Beauty Ink
FIND A STORE | CONTACT US | FAQs | ORDERS | Sign up for Offers View Your Cart Home » Beauty » Eyes » Eye Liner Eye Liner Almay Liquid Eye Liner Definite Brown Almay Amazing Eye Liner Precise Black Almay Amazing Eye Pencil Black Brown Almay Eye Liner Black Almay Eye Liner Brown Almay Intense i-Color Eye Pencil With Pearls For Blue Eyes Almay Intense i-Color Eye Pencil With Pearls For Brown Eyes Almay Intense i-Color Eye Pencil With Pearls For Green Eyes Almay Intense i-Color Eye Pencil With Pearls For Hazel Eyes Almay Intense i-Color Eye Liner Black Pearl Almay Intense i-Color Eye Liner Brown Topaz Almay Intense i-Color Eye Liner Purple Amethyst Almay Intense i-Color Eye Liner Raisin Quartz Almay Intense i-Color Liquid Eye Liner Black Pearl Almay Intense i-Color Eye Liner Brown Topaz Almay Intense i-Color Liquid Eye Liner Purple Amethyst Almay Intense i-Color Liquid Eye Liner Raisin Quartz Bonne Bell Eye Style Liner Brown Bonne Bell Eye Style Eye Liner Plum CoverGirl Perfect Point Get Inked Blac...
http://harmondiscount.com/beauty--eyes--eye-liner.html
*  Zoloft Side Effects On Eyes
... Alternative Medicine. Diet Nutrition. Disease Prevention. Injury. Mental Health. Parenting. Physical Examination. Drugs A-Z :. Zoloft Side Effects On Eyes. It is not a new thing for medicines to have side effects and hence, Zoloft is no different. One of its side effects is dry eyes. Most of the anti-depressant medications have seritonin re-uptake inhibitors and this is the main reason why there are side effects on the eyes. Along with causing dryness in the eyes, Zoloft can also cause conjunctivitis, which is an infection of the membrane covering the eyeball and the eyelid. Besides these, people also can have abnormality in their vision. In some cases, their vision may be blurred, or they may also have difficulty in distinguishing colors. It is advisable for those who are on Zoloft to seek all information related to the drug with respect to its side effects and withdrawal symptoms because though some people do complain of side effects associated with the eyes, there are others who may not have any such ...
http://rocketswag.com/health/drugs/z/zoloft/Zoloft-Side-Effects-On-Eyes.html

Diazotroph: Diazotrophs are bacteria and archaea that fix atmospheric nitrogen gas into a more usable form such as ammonia.LevobetaxololGuiding Eyes for the Blind: Yorktown Heights, New YorkHerbert screw: The Herbert screw (invented by Timothy Herbert) is a variable pitch cannulated screw typically made from titanium for its stainless properties as the screw is normally intended to remain in the patient indefinitely. It became generally available in 1978.Fixative (drawing): In drawing, a fixative is a liquid, similar to varnish, which is usually sprayed over a finished piece of artwork, usually a dry media artwork, to better preserve it and prevent smudging.Ocular dominance: Ocular dominance, sometimes called eye preference or eyedness, is the tendency to prefer visual input from one eye to the other. It is somewhat analogous to the laterality of right- or left-handedness; however, the side of the dominant eye and the dominant hand do not always match.Intramedullary rodOcular albinismHarrington Meeting HouseImbert-Fick law: The Imbert-Fick "law" was invented by Hans Goldmann (1899–1991) to give his newly marketed tonometer (with the help of the Haag-Streit Company) a quasi-scientific basis; it is mentioned in the ophthalmic and optometric literature, but not in any books of physics. According to Goldmann,Goldmann H.Intraocular lymphoma: Intraocular lymphoma is a rare malignant form of eye cancer. Intraocular lymphoma may affect the eye secondarily from a metastasis from a non-ocular tumor or may arise within the eye primarily (primary intraocular lymphoma, PIOL).Kirschner wireConjugate gaze palsyEye injuryIntraocular pressureSaccade: A saccade ( , French for jerk) is quick, simultaneous movement of both eyes between two phases of fixation in the same direction.Cassin, B.AlachrymaArtificial tearsRobert BrobergLogMAR chart: A LogMAR chart comprises rows of letters and is used by ophthalmologists and vision scientists to estimate visual acuity. This chart was developed at the National Vision Research Institute of Australia in 1976, and is designed to enable a more accurate estimate of acuity as compared to other charts (e.Diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis: Diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis (DUSN) is a rare condition that occurs in otherwise healthy, often young patients and is due to the presence of a subretinal nematode.ConjunctivochalasisLigneous conjunctivitis: Ligneous conjunctivitis is a rare form of chronic conjunctivitis characterized by recurrent, fibrin-rich pseudomembranous lesions of wood-like consistency that develop mainly on the underside of the eyelid (tarsal conjunctiva). It is generally a systemic disease which may involve the periodontal tissue, the upper and lower respiratory tract, kidneys, middle ear, and female genitalia.FormaldehydeNonunion: Nonunion is permanent failure of healing following a broken bone.Convergence of measures: In mathematics, more specifically measure theory, there are various notions of the convergence of measures. For an intuitive general sense of what is meant by convergence in measure, consider a sequence of measures μn on a space, sharing a common collection of measurable sets.Femoral fractureVanadium nitrogenaseAqueous humour: The aqueous humour is a transparent, gelatinous fluid similar to plasma, but containing low protein concentrations. It is secreted from the ciliary epithelium, a structure supporting the lens.Vitreous membrane: The vitreous membrane (or hyaloid membrane or vitreous cortex) is a layer of collagen separating the vitreous humour from the rest of the eye. At least two parts have been identified anatomically.Anterior segment mesenchymal dysgenesis: Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) is a failure of the normal development of the tissues of the anterior segment of the eye. It leads to anomalies in the structure of the mature anterior segment, associated with an increased risk of glaucoma and corneal opacity.Supracondylar humerus fractureBullous keratopathyIris dilator muscleBinocular vision: Binocular vision is vision in which creatures having two eyes use them together. The word binocular comes from two Latin roots, bini for double, and oculus for eye.Ciliary body: The ciliary body is a part of the eye that includes the ciliary muscle, which controls the shape of the lens, and the ciliary epithelium, which produces the aqueous humor. The ciliary body is part of the uvea, the layer of tissue that delivers oxygen and nutrients to the eye tissues.Retinal regeneration: Retinal regeneration deals with restoring retinal function to vertebrates so impaired.Charles D. Phelps: Charles Dexter Phelps (September 16, 1937 – September 13, 1985) was a prominent American medical doctor, professor, and researcher in the field of ophthalmology. The clinical studies he oversaw contributed to significant advances in the scientific understanding and surgical and pharmacological treatment of glaucoma.Osmium tetroxideChalkstick fracture: Chalkstick fractures are fractures, typically of long bones, in which the fracture is transverse to the long axis of the bone, like a broken stick of chalk. A healthy long bone typically breaks like a hard woody stick as the collagen in the matrix adds remarkable flexibility to the mineral and the energy can run up and down the growth rings of bone.StrabismusInterbody fusion cage: An interbody fusion cage (colloquially known as a "spine cage") is a prosthesis used in spinal fusion procedures to maintain foraminal height and decompression. They are cylindrical or square-shaped devices, and usually threaded.Inferior rectus muscle: The inferior rectus muscle is a muscle in the orbit.Saal Greenstein syndrome: Saal Greenstein syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by stunted growth, short limbs, microcephaly, and an anomalous cleavage of the anterior chamber of the eye. The disorder is similar to Robinow syndrome except for anterior chamber anomalies and, in one case, hydrocephalus.Spasm of accommodation: A spasm of accommodation (also known as an accommodation, or accommodative spasm) is a condition in which the ciliary muscle of the eye remains in a constant state of contraction. Normal accommodation allows the eye to "accommodate" for near-vision.Carbon fixation: Carbon fixation or сarbon assimilation refers to the conversion process of inorganic carbon (carbon dioxide) to organic compounds by living organisms. The most prominent example is photosynthesis, although chemosynthesis is another form of carbon fixation that can take place in the absence of sunlight.Fowkes hypothesis: The Fowkes hypothesis (after F. M.PhenylacetyleneHay–Wells syndromeJoint dislocationAutorefractor: An autorefractor or automated refractor is a computer-controlled machine used during an eye examination to provide an objective measurement of a person's refractive error and prescription for glasses or contact lenses. This is achieved by measuring how light is changed as it enters a person's eye.Symbiosis Center of Health Care: Symbiosis Center of Health Care (SCHC) is an organization under Symbiosis Society which takes care of health of symbiosis family be it student or staff.http://www.Lens Controller: A Lens Controller is device that controls motorized photographic lens functions such as zoom, focus, and iris or aperture.Kruegle, Herman (2007).Meridian (perimetry, visual field): Meridian (plural: "meridians") is used in perimetry and in specifying visual fields. According to IPS Perimetry Standards 1978 (2002): "Perimetry is the measurement of [an observer's] visual functions ...Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingCicatricial pemphigoidOptimax: Optimax is a UK-based laser eye treatment specialist which has 38 locations nationwide. Optimax was established as one of the first private clinics to offer laser eye surgery.Purtscher's retinopathy: Purtscher's retinopathy is a disease where part of the eye (retina) is damaged. Usually associated with severe head injuries, it may also occur with other types of trauma, such as long bone fractures, or with several non-traumatic systemic diseases.Chorioretinitis: Chorioretinitis is an inflammation of the choroid (thin pigmented vascular coat of the eye) and retina of the eye. It is a form of posterior uveitis.New Zealand rabbit

(1/2420) MST neuronal responses to heading direction during pursuit eye movements.

As you move through the environment, you see a radial pattern of visual motion with a focus of expansion (FOE) that indicates your heading direction. When self-movement is combined with smooth pursuit eye movements, the turning of the eye distorts the retinal image of the FOE but somehow you still can perceive heading. We studied neurons in the medial superior temporal area (MST) of monkey visual cortex, recording responses to FOE stimuli presented during fixation and smooth pursuit eye movements. Almost all neurons showed significant changes in their FOE selective responses during pursuit eye movements. However, the vector average of all the neuronal responses indicated the direction of the FOE during both fixation and pursuit. Furthermore, the amplitude of the net vector increased with increasing FOE eccentricity. We conclude that neuronal population encoding in MST might contribute to pursuit-tolerant heading perception.  (+info)

(2/2420) Eye movement deficits following ibotenic acid lesions of the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi in monkeys II. Pursuit, vestibular, and optokinetic responses.

The eyes are moved by a combination of neural commands that code eye velocity and eye position. The eye position signal is supposed to be derived from velocity-coded command signals by mathematical integration via a single oculomotor neural integrator. For horizontal eye movements, the neural integrator is thought to reside in the rostral nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (nph) and project directly to the abducens nuclei. In a previous study, permanent, serial ibotenic acid lesions of the nph in three rhesus macaques compromised the neural integrator for fixation but saccades were not affected. In the present study, to determine further whether the nph is the neural substrate for a single oculomotor neural integrator, the effects of those lesions on smooth pursuit, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), vestibular nystagmus (VN), and optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) are documented. The lesions were correlated with long-lasting deficits in eye movements, indicated most clearly by the animals' inability to maintain steady gaze in the dark. However, smooth pursuit and sinusoidal VOR in the dark, like the saccades in the previous study, were affected minimally. The gain of horizontal smooth pursuit (eye movement/target movement) decreased slightly (<25%) and phase lead increased slightly for all frequencies (0.3-1.0 Hz, +/-10 degrees target tracking), most noticeably for higher frequencies (0.8-0.7 and approximately 20 degrees for 1.0-Hz tracking). Vertical smooth pursuit was not affected significantly. Surprisingly, horizontal sinusoidal VOR gain and phase also were not affected significantly. Lesions had complex effects on both VN and OKN. The plateau of per- and postrotatory VN was shortened substantially ( approximately 50%), whereas the initial response and the time constant of decay decreased slightly. The initial OKN response also decreased slightly, and the charging phase was prolonged transiently then recovered to below normal levels like the VN time constant. Maximum steady-state, slow eye velocity of OKN decreased progressively by approximately 30% over the course of the lesions. These results support the previous conclusion that the oculomotor neural integrator is not a single neural entity and that the mathematical integrative function for different oculomotor subsystems is most likely distributed among a number of nuclei. They also show that the nph apparently is not involved in integrating smooth pursuit signals and that lesions of the nph can fractionate the VOR and nystagmic responses to adequate stimuli.  (+info)

(3/2420) Optimality of position commands to horizontal eye muscles: A test of the minimum-norm rule.

Six muscles control the position of the eye, which has three degrees of freedom. Daunicht proposed an optimization rule for solving this redundancy problem, whereby small changes in eye position are maintained by the minimum possible change in motor commands to the eye (the minimum-norm rule). The present study sought to test this proposal for the simplified one-dimensional case of small changes in conjugate eye position in the horizontal plane. Assuming such changes involve only the horizontal recti, Daunicht's hypothesis predicts reciprocal innervation with the size of the change in command matched to the strength of the recipient muscle at every starting position of the eye. If the motor command to a muscle is interpreted as the summed firing rate of its oculomotor neuron (OMN) pool, the minimum-norm prediction can be tested by comparing OMN firing rates with forces in the horizontal recti. The comparison showed 1) for the OMN firing rates given by Van Gisbergen and Van Opstal and the muscle forces given by Robinson, there was good agreement between the minimum-norm prediction and experimental observation over about a +/-30 degrees range of eye positions. This fit was robust with respect to variations in muscle stiffness and in methods of calculating muscle innervation. 2) Other data sets gave different estimates for the range of eye-positions within which the minimum-norm prediction held. The main sources of variation appeared to be disagreement about the proportion of OMNs with very low firing-rate thresholds (i.e., less than approximately 35 degrees in the OFF direction) and uncertainty about eye-muscle behavior for extreme (>30 degrees ) positions of the eye. 3) For all data sets, the range of eye positions over which the minimum-norm rule applied was determined by the pattern of motor-unit recruitment inferred for those data. It corresponded to the range of eye positions over which the size principle of recruitment was obeyed by both agonist and antagonist muscles. It is argued that the current best estimate of the oculomotor range over which minimum-norm control could be used for conjugate horizontal eye position is approximately +/-30 degrees. The uncertainty associated with this estimate would be reduced by obtaining unbiased samples of OMN firing rates. Minimum-norm control may result from reduction of the image movement produced by noise in OMN firing rates.  (+info)

(4/2420) Short-latency vergence eye movements induced by radial optic flow in humans: dependence on ambient vergence level.

Radial patterns of optic flow, such as those experienced by moving observers who look in the direction of heading, evoke vergence eye movements at short latency. We have investigated the dependence of these responses on the ambient vergence level. Human subjects faced a large tangent screen onto which two identical random-dot patterns were back-projected. A system of crossed polarizers ensured that each eye saw only one of the patterns, with mirror galvanometers to control the horizontal positions of the images and hence the vergence angle between the two eyes. After converging the subject's eyes at one of several distances ranging from 16.7 cm to infinity, both patterns were replaced with new ones (using a system of shutters and two additional projectors) so as to simulate the radial flow associated with a sudden 4% change in viewing distance with the focus of expansion/contraction imaged in or very near both foveas. Radial-flow steps induced transient vergence at latencies of 80-100 ms, expansions causing increases in convergence and contractions the converse. Based on the change in vergence 90-140 ms after the onset of the steps, responses were proportional to the preexisting vergence angle (and hence would be expected to be inversely proportional to viewing distance under normal conditions). We suggest that this property assists the observer who wants to fixate ahead while passing through a visually cluttered area (e.g., a forest) and so wants to avoid making vergence responses to the optic flow created by the nearby objects in the periphery.  (+info)

(5/2420) Motor cortical encoding of serial order in a context-recall task.

The neural encoding of serial order was studied in the motor cortex of monkeys performing a context-recall memory scanning task. Up to five visual stimuli were presented successively on a circle (list presentation phase), and then one of them (test stimulus) changed color; the monkeys had to make a single motor response toward the stimulus that immediately followed the test stimulus in the list. Correct performance in this task depends on memorization of the serial order of the stimuli during their presentation. It was found that changes in neural activity during the list presentation phase reflected the serial order of the stimuli; the effect on cell activity of the serial order of stimuli during their presentation was at least as strong as the effect of motor direction on cell activity during the execution of the motor response. This establishes the serial order of stimuli in a motor task as an important determinant of motor cortical activity during stimulus presentation and in the absence of changes in peripheral motor events, in contrast to the commonly held view of the motor cortex as just an "upper motor neuron."  (+info)

(6/2420) Action of the brain stem saccade generator during horizontal gaze shifts. I. Discharge patterns of omnidirectional pause neurons.

Omnidirectional pause neurons (OPNs) pause for the duration of a saccade in all directions because they are part of the neural mechanism that controls saccade duration. In the natural situation, however, large saccades are accompanied by head movements to produce rapid gaze shifts. To determine whether OPNs are part of the mechanism that controls the whole gaze shift rather than the eye saccade alone, we monitored the activity of 44 OPNs that paused for rightward and leftward gaze shifts but otherwise discharged at relatively constant average rates. Pause duration was well correlated with the duration of either eye or gaze movement but poorly correlated with the duration of head movement. The time of pause onset was aligned tightly with the onset of either eye or gaze movement but only loosely aligned with the onset of head movement. These data suggest that the OPN pause does not encode the duration of head movement. Further, the end of the OPN pause was often better aligned with the end of the eye movement than with the end of the gaze movement for individual gaze shifts. For most gaze shifts, the eye component ended with an immediate counterrotation owing to the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR), and gaze ended at variable times thereafter. In those gaze shifts where eye counterrotation was delayed, the end of the pause also was delayed. Taken together, these data suggest that the end of the pause influences the onset of eye counterrotation, not the end of the gaze shift. We suggest that OPN neurons act to control only that portion of the gaze movement that is commanded by the eye burst generator. This command is expressed by driving the saccadic eye movement directly and also by suppressing VOR eye counterrotation. Because gaze end is less well correlated with pause end and often occurs well after counterrotation onset, we conclude that elements of the burst generator typically are not active till gaze end, and that gaze end is determined by another mechanism independent of the OPNs.  (+info)

(7/2420) Optical imaging of functional domains in the cortex of the awake and behaving monkey.

As demonstrated by anatomical and physiological studies, the cerebral cortex consists of groups of cortical modules, each comprising populations of neurons with similar functional properties. This functional modularity exists in both sensory and association neocortices. However, the role of such cortical modules in perceptual and cognitive behavior is unknown. To aid in the examination of this issue we have applied the high spatial resolution optical imaging methodology to the study of awake, behaving animals. In this paper, we report the optical imaging of orientation domains and blob structures, approximately 100-200 micrometer in size, in visual cortex of the awake and behaving monkey. By overcoming the spatial limitations of other existing imaging methods, optical imaging will permit the study of a wide variety of cortical functions at the columnar level, including motor and cognitive functions traditionally studied with positron-emission tomography or functional MRI techniques.  (+info)

(8/2420) Three-dimensional eye-head coordination during gaze saccades in the primate.

The purpose of this investigation was to describe the neural constraints on three-dimensional (3-D) orientations of the eye in space (Es), head in space (Hs), and eye in head (Eh) during visual fixations in the monkey and the control strategies used to implement these constraints during head-free gaze saccades. Dual scleral search coil signals were used to compute 3-D orientation quaternions, two-dimensional (2-D) direction vectors, and 3-D angular velocity vectors for both the eye and head in three monkeys during the following visual tasks: radial to/from center, repetitive horizontal, nonrepetitive oblique, random (wide 2-D range), and random with pin-hole goggles. Although 2-D gaze direction (of Es) was controlled more tightly than the contributing 2-D Hs and Eh components, the torsional standard deviation of Es was greater (mean 3.55 degrees ) than Hs (3.10 degrees ), which in turn was greater than Eh (1.87 degrees ) during random fixations. Thus the 3-D Es range appeared to be the byproduct of Hs and Eh constraints, resulting in a pseudoplanar Es range that was twisted (in orthogonal coordinates) like the zero torsion range of Fick coordinates. The Hs fixation range was similarly Fick-like, whereas the Eh fixation range was quasiplanar. The latter Eh range was maintained through exquisite saccade/slow phase coordination, i.e., during each head movement, multiple anticipatory saccades drove the eye torsionally out of the planar range such that subsequent slow phases drove the eye back toward the fixation range. The Fick-like Hs constraint was maintained by the following strategies: first, during purely vertical/horizontal movements, the head rotated about constantly oriented axes that closely resembled physical Fick gimbals, i.e., about head-fixed horizontal axes and space-fixed vertical axes, respectively (although in 1 animal, the latter constraint was relaxed during repetitive horizontal movements, allowing for trajectory optimization). However, during large oblique movements, head orientation made transient but dramatic departures from the zero-torsion Fick surface, taking the shortest path between two torsionally eccentric fixation points on the surface. Moreover, in the pin-hole goggle task, the head-orientation range flattened significantly, suggesting a task-dependent default strategy similar to Listing's law. These and previous observations suggest two quasi-independent brain stem circuits: an oculomotor 2-D to 3-D transformation that coordinates anticipatory saccades with slow phases to uphold Listing's law, and a flexible "Fick operator" that selects head motor error; both nested within a dynamic gaze feedback loop.  (+info)


what is between a detached retina and Ocular Migraine?


I have all the symptoms of a detached retina but it has been tested and proven several times thats not what it is. The next one down on the symptoms list is an ocular migraine but the symptoms are more often than with an ocular migraine. Anyone with medical knowledge with an idea?
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Retinal detachment is easily diagnosed and can be treated in ophthalmology centers, ocular migraine is poorly understood and hence there is no treatment for this condition. Only taking precautions when one gets an attack, is advised. See-
http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/ocular-migraine.htm
Hope it helps.


How can a person tell if they have ocular herpes? What signs are visible? Is there any treatment?


If there are so many ppl that have the disease why is it never spoken about? From reading various articles there are so many people with herpes. Is there a treatment for the ocular herpes to prevent blindness?
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Ocular herpes are basically fluid-filled fever blisters on and around the eye. They are very painful. There are medications to treat an outbreak and medications to help prevent outbreaks, but there is no cure.


How do you fix a ocular migraine without medicine?


my mom has an ocular migraine, and i have a field trip tomorrow and i need alot of stuff for it and we need to go shopping but its 4:44 and she wont get out of bed.  and tomorrows memorial day.. just thought i would put that out there...
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Here doe . (:

http://www.webmd.com/migraines-headaches/guide/ocular-migraine-basics

http://www.webmd.com/migraines-headaches/ocular-migraine-treatment

http://opticmigraines.com/how-to-prevent-and-treat-migraine-headaches.html

http://opticmigraines.com/natural-migraine-treatment-natural-treatment-gets-to-the-root-cause.html

http://www.steadyhealth.com/articles/Ocular_Migraine__Eye_Migraines_or_Ophthalmic_Migraine_a1144.html

http://www.freemd.com/ocular-migraine/treatment.htm

Basics: 

~ Rest
~ Cold compress
~ Stay still

Welcome [;


What is the best method of measuring ocular pressure?


I have been having mine tested for several years now as they are higher than average but no damage so far. I have had 2 methods used one the "puff "test and another putting something onto the eyeball.

Any suggestions on different methods of reducing ocular  pressure and general advice?. Many thanks in advance.
Many thanks for so many careful replies, particularly MrsSSG B Jennifer cheeky etc.Of course I will follow what the specialist says but it is really nice to hear from some people who are associated with optometry
cheeky, your :"Intense physical exertion is known to reduce intraocular pressure" link was very interesting
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"There are several methods of testing for glaucoma.

The applanation method measures the force required to flatten a certain area of the cornea. A fine strip of paper stained with orange dye is touched to the side of the eye. The dye stains the front of the eye to help with the examination, then rinses out with tears. An anesthetic drop is also placed in the eye.

The slit-lamp is placed in front of you and you rest your chin and forehead on a support that keeps your head steady. The lamp is moved forward until the tonometer touches the cornea. The light is usually a blue circle. The health care provider looks through the eyepiece on the lamp and adjusts the tension on the tonometer. There is no discomfort associated with the test.

A slightly different method of applanation uses an object similar to pencil. Again, you are given numbing eye drops to prevent any discomfort. The device touches the outside of the eye and instantly records eye pressure. 

The last method is the noncontact method (air puff). In this method, your chin rests on a padded stand. You stare straight into the examining device. The eye doctor shines a bright light into your eye to properly line up the instrument, and then delivers a brief puff of air at your eye. The machine measures eye pressure by looking at how the light reflections change as the air hits the eye." http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003447.htm

There is a correlation between intraocular pressure and corneal thickness that makes an individual's intraocular pressure higher or lower from the "normal" range.

The Glaucoma community has denounced the use of marijuana as a medical treatment for high intraocular pressures.  PrinceIdoc covered this in another post.  

The only way to 'reduce' intraocular pressure is through prescription medications prescribed by your eye doctor.

The best advice I can give is to follow and work closely with your eye doctor for any other signs of glaucoma or damage from increased intraocular pressures.

There is no way you can treat intraocular pressure yourself, only to keep up with your eye health management with your eye doctor.


Do I really need to see a neurologist for an ocular migraine?


I went to the ER for an ocular migraine (no pain).  The physician recommended I see a neurologist.  I don't have much money, can't I wait to see if I get the migraines again before seeing the neuro?
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How long can an ocular migraine last?


I see a flashing strobe light out of the corner of my left eye.  My doctor thinks it may be ocular migraines (it's not a torn retina according to the eye doctor).  But I have had this flashing every day for over 2 months!!!  Could an ocular migraine really last THAT long???
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I get the same thing.  Its a migrain that doesn't hurt but effects your vision and is very frustrating because you can't focus and lights flash or things in site swirl.  Very frightening the first few times.  They should not last for 2 months straight.  Although you can get one every day that last a few minutes or an hour or more.  When this happens, take Tylenol and drink a coke.  (I know, that sucks, I absolutley HATE soda and that's the only time I drink it).  Lay down in a quite dark room and try to relax.  It should go away very quickly.

If you are having one non-stop for 2 months then I suggest you go see a neurologist.  That is not normal.


Can you get glasses for a ocular migraine?


Can you. Some answered my question bout weird things in my eyes and they said it sound like an ocular migraine and i looked it up and found symptoms and those were exactly what i got when i had an ocular migraine.

The ye doctor said nothing was wrong with my eyes

im 12, no one believes me

can u get glasses for an ocular migraine?
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No. Glasses have absolutely no affect upon ocular migraine.


Has anyone else experienced an ocular migraine?


I had my first one today...I do suffer migraines, but this is the first ocular migraine I have had.  No pain but a growing zigzag blind spot, I could see around the edge but anything in the middle I was blind too.  This was one of the most frighten things I have ever experienced, lasted about 45mins then ended, but moved into the more common type of migraine with sever pain. Anyone else experienced this?
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had one some time ago couldn't see my hands everything else was OK except the hands it was really weird