Escherichia coli Proteins: Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Escherichia coli Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.Escherichia coli O157: A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Escherichia coli K12: A species of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria belonging to the K serogroup of ESCHERICHIA COLI. It lives as a harmless inhabitant of the human LARGE INTESTINE and is widely used in medical and GENETIC RESEARCH.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Adhesins, Escherichia coli: Thin, filamentous protein structures, including proteinaceous capsular antigens (fimbrial antigens), that mediate adhesion of E. coli to surfaces and play a role in pathogenesis. They have a high affinity for various epithelial cells.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Chromosomes, Bacterial: Structures within the nucleus of bacterial cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.RNA, Bacterial: Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins: Proteins isolated from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.Coliphages: Viruses whose host is Escherichia coli.Genes: A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Restriction Mapping: Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI that produce or contain at least one member of either heat-labile or heat-stable ENTEROTOXINS. The organisms colonize the mucosal surface of the small intestine and elaborate their enterotoxins causing DIARRHEA. They are mainly associated with tropical and developing countries and affect susceptible travelers to those places.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli: Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI with the ability to produce at least one or more of at least two antigenically distinct, usually bacteriophage-mediated cytotoxins: SHIGA TOXIN 1 and SHIGA TOXIN 2. These bacteria can cause severe disease in humans including bloody DIARRHEA and HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI characterized by attaching-and-effacing histopathology. These strains of bacteria intimately adhere to the epithelial cell membrane and show effacement of microvilli. In developed countries they are associated with INFANTILE DIARRHEA and infantile GASTROENTERITIS and, in contrast to ETEC strains, do not produce ENDOTOXINS.Bacterial Toxins: Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Fimbriae, Bacterial: Thin, hairlike appendages, 1 to 20 microns in length and often occurring in large numbers, present on the cells of gram-negative bacteria, particularly Enterobacteriaceae and Neisseria. Unlike flagella, they do not possess motility, but being protein (pilin) in nature, they possess antigenic and hemagglutinating properties. They are of medical importance because some fimbriae mediate the attachment of bacteria to cells via adhesins (ADHESINS, BACTERIAL). Bacterial fimbriae refer to common pili, to be distinguished from the preferred use of "pili", which is confined to sex pili (PILI, SEX).Conjugation, Genetic: A parasexual process in BACTERIA; ALGAE; FUNGI; and ciliate EUKARYOTA for achieving exchange of chromosome material during fusion of two cells. In bacteria, this is a uni-directional transfer of genetic material; in protozoa it is a bi-directional exchange. In algae and fungi, it is a form of sexual reproduction, with the union of male and female gametes.Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Escherichia: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms occur in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. The species are either nonpathogenic or opportunistic pathogens.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli: Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI that are a subgroup of SHIGA-TOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI. They cause non-bloody and bloody DIARRHEA; HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME; and hemorrhagic COLITIS. An important member of this subgroup is ESCHERICHIA COLI O157-H7.Uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Strains of Escherichia coli that preferentially grow and persist within the urinary tract. They exhibit certain virulence factors and strategies that cause urinary tract infections.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.beta-Galactosidase: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Escherichia coli Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent or treat both enterotoxigenic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infections.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Bacteriophage lambda: A temperate inducible phage and type species of the genus lambda-like viruses, in the family SIPHOVIRIDAE. Its natural host is E. coli K12. Its VIRION contains linear double-stranded DNA with single-stranded 12-base 5' sticky ends. The DNA circularizes on infection.Chloramphenicol: An antibiotic first isolated from cultures of Streptomyces venequelae in 1947 but now produced synthetically. It has a relatively simple structure and was the first broad-spectrum antibiotic to be discovered. It acts by interfering with bacterial protein synthesis and is mainly bacteriostatic. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 29th ed, p106)Enterotoxins: Substances that are toxic to the intestinal tract causing vomiting, diarrhea, etc.; most common enterotoxins are produced by bacteria.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases: Enzymes that catalyze DNA template-directed extension of the 3'-end of an RNA strand one nucleotide at a time. They can initiate a chain de novo. In eukaryotes, three forms of the enzyme have been distinguished on the basis of sensitivity to alpha-amanitin, and the type of RNA synthesized. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992).Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Membrane Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.Transduction, Genetic: The transfer of bacterial DNA by phages from an infected bacterium to another bacterium. This also refers to the transfer of genes into eukaryotic cells by viruses. This naturally occurring process is routinely employed as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Fimbriae Proteins: Proteins that are structural components of bacterial fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) or sex pili (PILI, SEX).Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Colicins: Bacteriocins elaborated by strains of Escherichia coli and related species. They are proteins or protein-lipopolysaccharide complexes lethal to other strains of the same species.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.DNA Restriction Enzymes: Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.Genetics, Microbial: A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the genetic mechanisms and processes of microorganisms.DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Shiga Toxin 1: A toxin produced by certain pathogenic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157. It is closely related to SHIGA TOXIN produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE.Galactosidases: A family of galactoside hydrolases that hydrolyze compounds with an O-galactosyl linkage. EC 3.2.1.-.Lac Operon: The genetic unit consisting of three structural genes, an operator and a regulatory gene. The regulatory gene controls the synthesis of the three structural genes: BETA-GALACTOSIDASE and beta-galactoside permease (involved with the metabolism of lactose), and beta-thiogalactoside acetyltransferase.Adenosine Triphosphatases: A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.Urinary Tract Infections: Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.SOS Response (Genetics): An error-prone mechanism or set of functions for repairing damaged microbial DNA. SOS functions (a concept reputedly derived from the SOS of the international distress signal) are involved in DNA repair and mutagenesis, in cell division inhibition, in recovery of normal physiological conditions after DNA repair, and possibly in cell death when DNA damage is extensive.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Transformation, Bacterial: The heritable modification of the properties of a competent bacterium by naked DNA from another source. The uptake of naked DNA is a naturally occuring phenomenon in some bacteria. It is often used as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Genes, Regulator: Genes which regulate or circumscribe the activity of other genes; specifically, genes which code for PROTEINS or RNAs which have GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION functions.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Ribosomes: Multicomponent ribonucleoprotein structures found in the CYTOPLASM of all cells, and in MITOCHONDRIA, and PLASTIDS. They function in PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS via GENETIC TRANSLATION.beta-Lactamases: Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Lysogeny: The phenomenon by which a temperate phage incorporates itself into the DNA of a bacterial host, establishing a kind of symbiotic relation between PROPHAGE and bacterium which results in the perpetuation of the prophage in all the descendants of the bacterium. Upon induction (VIRUS ACTIVATION) by various agents, such as ultraviolet radiation, the phage is released, which then becomes virulent and lyses the bacterium.Periplasmic Binding Proteins: Periplasmic proteins that scavenge or sense diverse nutrients. In the bacterial environment they usually couple to transporters or chemotaxis receptors on the inner bacterial membrane.Rec A Recombinases: A family of recombinases initially identified in BACTERIA. They catalyze the ATP-driven exchange of DNA strands in GENETIC RECOMBINATION. The product of the reaction consists of a duplex and a displaced single-stranded loop, which has the shape of the letter D and is therefore called a D-loop structure.Anaerobiosis: The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Suppression, Genetic: Mutation process that restores the wild-type PHENOTYPE in an organism possessing a mutationally altered GENOTYPE. The second "suppressor" mutation may be on a different gene, on the same gene but located at a distance from the site of the primary mutation, or in extrachromosomal genes (EXTRACHROMOSOMAL INHERITANCE).Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.Shiga Toxin 2: A toxin produced by certain pathogenic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157. It shares 50-60% homology with SHIGA TOXIN and SHIGA TOXIN 1.Maltose-Binding Proteins: Periplasmic proteins that bind MALTOSE and maltodextrin. They take part in the maltose transport system of BACTERIA.Enterobacteriaceae: A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.DNA, Recombinant: Biologically active DNA which has been formed by the in vitro joining of segments of DNA from different sources. It includes the recombination joint or edge of a heteroduplex region where two recombining DNA molecules are connected.Meningitis, Escherichia coli: A form of gram-negative meningitis that tends to occur in neonates, in association with anatomical abnormalities (which feature communication between the meninges and cutaneous structures) or as OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS in association with IMMUNOLOGIC DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES. In premature neonates the clinical presentation may be limited to ANOREXIA; VOMITING; lethargy; or respiratory distress. Full-term infants may have as additional features FEVER; SEIZURES; and bulging of the anterior fontanelle. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp398-400)Salmonella typhimurium: A serotype of Salmonella enterica that is a frequent agent of Salmonella gastroenteritis in humans. It also causes PARATYPHOID FEVER.RNA, Transfer: The small RNA molecules, 73-80 nucleotides long, that function during translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC) to align AMINO ACIDS at the RIBOSOMES in a sequence determined by the mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). There are about 30 different transfer RNAs. Each recognizes a specific CODON set on the mRNA through its own ANTICODON and as aminoacyl tRNAs (RNA, TRANSFER, AMINO ACYL), each carries a specific amino acid to the ribosome to add to the elongating peptide chains.Lactose: A disaccharide of GLUCOSE and GALACTOSE in human and cow milk. It is used in pharmacy for tablets, in medicine as a nutrient, and in industry.Sigma Factor: A protein which is a subunit of RNA polymerase. It effects initiation of specific RNA chains from DNA.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Ribosomal Proteins: Proteins found in ribosomes. They are believed to have a catalytic function in reconstituting biologically active ribosomal subunits.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Virulence Factors: Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)Aerobiosis: Life or metabolic reactions occurring in an environment containing oxygen.DNA Replication: The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.Shiga Toxins: A class of toxins that inhibit protein synthesis by blocking the interaction of ribosomal RNA; (RNA, RIBOSOMAL) with PEPTIDE ELONGATION FACTORS. They include SHIGA TOXIN which is produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE and a variety of shiga-like toxins that are produced by pathologic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157.Oxidoreductases: The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Mutagenesis, Insertional: Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).F Factor: A plasmid whose presence in the cell, either extrachromosomal or integrated into the BACTERIAL CHROMOSOME, determines the "sex" of the bacterium, host chromosome mobilization, transfer via conjugation (CONJUGATION, GENETIC) of genetic material, and the formation of SEX PILI.Phosphotransferases: A rather large group of enzymes comprising not only those transferring phosphate but also diphosphate, nucleotidyl residues, and others. These have also been subdivided according to the acceptor group. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.ThymineDNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Periplasmic Proteins: Proteins found in the PERIPLASM of organisms with cell walls.Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Bacillus subtilis: A species of gram-positive bacteria that is a common soil and water saprophyte.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Open Reading Frames: A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Ultraviolet Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.R Factors: A class of plasmids that transfer antibiotic resistance from one bacterium to another by conjugation.Isopropyl Thiogalactoside: A non-metabolizable galactose analog that induces expression of the LAC OPERON.Adhesins, Bacterial: Cell-surface components or appendages of bacteria that facilitate adhesion (BACTERIAL ADHESION) to other cells or to inanimate surfaces. Most fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) of gram-negative bacteria function as adhesins, but in many cases it is a minor subunit protein at the tip of the fimbriae that is the actual adhesin. In gram-positive bacteria, a protein or polysaccharide surface layer serves as the specific adhesin. What is sometimes called polymeric adhesin (BIOFILMS) is distinct from protein adhesin.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Periplasm: The space between the inner and outer membranes of a cell that is shared with the cell wall.Nalidixic Acid: A synthetic 1,8-naphthyridine antimicrobial agent with a limited bacteriocidal spectrum. It is an inhibitor of the A subunit of bacterial DNA GYRASE.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Hydrolysis: The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Streptomycin: An antibiotic produced by the soil actinomycete Streptomyces griseus. It acts by inhibiting the initiation and elongation processes during protein synthesis.Codon: A set of three nucleotides in a protein coding sequence that specifies individual amino acids or a termination signal (CODON, TERMINATOR). Most codons are universal, but some organisms do not produce the transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER) complementary to all codons. These codons are referred to as unassigned codons (CODONS, NONSENSE).Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.O Antigens: The lipopolysaccharide-protein somatic antigens, usually from gram-negative bacteria, important in the serological classification of enteric bacilli. The O-specific chains determine the specificity of the O antigens of a given serotype. O antigens are the immunodominant part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule in the intact bacterial cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Enzyme Stability: The extent to which an enzyme retains its structural conformation or its activity when subjected to storage, isolation, and purification or various other physical or chemical manipulations, including proteolytic enzymes and heat.Catalysis: The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.Histidine: An essential amino acid that is required for the production of HISTAMINE.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Hemolysin Proteins: Proteins from BACTERIA and FUNGI that are soluble enough to be secreted to target ERYTHROCYTES and insert into the membrane to form beta-barrel pores. Biosynthesis may be regulated by HEMOLYSIN FACTORS.Cysteine: A thiol-containing non-essential amino acid that is oxidized to form CYSTINE.DNA Repair: The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.ArabinoseCarbon Isotopes: Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.UracilSpheroplasts: Cells, usually bacteria or yeast, which have partially lost their cell wall, lost their characteristic shape and become round.Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.Porins: Porins are protein molecules that were originally found in the outer membrane of GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA and that form multi-meric channels for the passive DIFFUSION of WATER; IONS; or other small molecules. Porins are present in bacterial CELL WALLS, as well as in plant, fungal, mammalian and other vertebrate CELL MEMBRANES and MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANES.Shigella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that ferments sugar without gas production. Its organisms are intestinal pathogens of man and other primates and cause bacillary dysentery (DYSENTERY, BACILLARY).Cell-Free System: A fractionated cell extract that maintains a biological function. A subcellular fraction isolated by ultracentrifugation or other separation techniques must first be isolated so that a process can be studied free from all of the complex side reactions that occur in a cell. The cell-free system is therefore widely used in cell biology. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p166)Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A syndrome that is associated with microvascular diseases of the KIDNEY, such as RENAL CORTICAL NECROSIS. It is characterized by hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC); THROMBOCYTOPENIA; and ACUTE RENAL FAILURE.RNA, Ribosomal: The most abundant form of RNA. Together with proteins, it forms the ribosomes, playing a structural role and also a role in ribosomal binding of mRNA and tRNAs. Individual chains are conventionally designated by their sedimentation coefficients. In eukaryotes, four large chains exist, synthesized in the nucleolus and constituting about 50% of the ribosome. (Dorland, 28th ed)DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Heat-Shock Proteins: Proteins which are synthesized in eukaryotic organisms and bacteria in response to hyperthermia and other environmental stresses. They increase thermal tolerance and perform functions essential to cell survival under these conditions.Genetic Engineering: Directed modification of the gene complement of a living organism by such techniques as altering the DNA, substituting genetic material by means of a virus, transplanting whole nuclei, transplanting cell hybrids, etc.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.PeptidoglycanMultienzyme Complexes: Systems of enzymes which function sequentially by catalyzing consecutive reactions linked by common metabolic intermediates. They may involve simply a transfer of water molecules or hydrogen atoms and may be associated with large supramolecular structures such as MITOCHONDRIA or RIBOSOMES.Serine Endopeptidases: Any member of the group of ENDOPEPTIDASES containing at the active site a serine residue involved in catalysis.Maltose: A dextrodisaccharide from malt and starch. It is used as a sweetening agent and fermentable intermediate in brewing. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Shiga Toxin: A toxin produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE. It is the prototype of class of toxins that inhibit protein synthesis by blocking the interaction of ribosomal RNA; (RNA, RIBOSOMAL) with PEPTIDE ELONGATION FACTORS.Hydro-Lyases: Enzymes that catalyze the breakage of a carbon-oxygen bond leading to unsaturated products via the removal of water. EC 4.2.1.Lyases: A class of enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of C-C, C-O, and C-N, and other bonds by other means than by hydrolysis or oxidation. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 4.Tryptophan: An essential amino acid that is necessary for normal growth in infants and for NITROGEN balance in adults. It is a precursor of INDOLE ALKALOIDS in plants. It is a precursor of SEROTONIN (hence its use as an antidepressant and sleep aid). It can be a precursor to NIACIN, albeit inefficiently, in mammals.Protein Folding: Processes involved in the formation of TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE.Crystallization: The formation of crystalline substances from solutions or melts. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Amino Acyl-tRNA Synthetases: A subclass of enzymes that aminoacylate AMINO ACID-SPECIFIC TRANSFER RNA with their corresponding AMINO ACIDS.Genetic Vectors: DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Pyelonephritis: Inflammation of the KIDNEY involving the renal parenchyma (the NEPHRONS); KIDNEY PELVIS; and KIDNEY CALICES. It is characterized by ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; NAUSEA; VOMITING; and occasionally DIARRHEA.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Endoribonucleases: A family of enzymes that catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of RNA. It includes EC 3.1.26.-, EC 3.1.27.-, EC 3.1.30.-, and EC 3.1.31.-.Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein: A transcriptional regulator in prokaryotes which, when activated by binding cyclic AMP, acts at several promoters. Cyclic AMP receptor protein was originally identified as a catabolite gene activator protein. It was subsequently shown to regulate several functions unrelated to catabolism, and to be both a negative and a positive regulator of transcription. Cell surface cyclic AMP receptors are not included (CYCLIC AMP RECEPTORS), nor are the eukaryotic cytoplasmic cyclic AMP receptor proteins, which are the regulatory subunits of CYCLIC AMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASES.T-Phages: A series of 7 virulent phages which infect E. coli. The T-even phages T2, T4; (BACTERIOPHAGE T4), and T6, and the phage T5 are called "autonomously virulent" because they cause cessation of all bacterial metabolism on infection. Phages T1, T3; (BACTERIOPHAGE T3), and T7; (BACTERIOPHAGE T7) are called "dependent virulent" because they depend on continued bacterial metabolism during the lytic cycle. The T-even phages contain 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in place of ordinary cytosine in their DNA.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Protein Sorting Signals: Amino acid sequences found in transported proteins that selectively guide the distribution of the proteins to specific cellular compartments.Exodeoxyribonuclease V: An ATP-dependent exodeoxyribonuclease that cleaves in either the 5'- to 3'- or the 3'- to 5'-direction to yield 5'-phosphooligonucleotides. It is primarily found in BACTERIA.Magnesium: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.Isoleucine: An essential branched-chain aliphatic amino acid found in many proteins. It is an isomer of LEUCINE. It is important in hemoglobin synthesis and regulation of blood sugar and energy levels.DNA, Single-Stranded: A single chain of deoxyribonucleotides that occurs in some bacteria and viruses. It usually exists as a covalently closed circle.N-Glycosyl Hydrolases: A class of enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of nitrogen-linked sugars.Lipopolysaccharides: Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Integration Host Factors: Bacterial proteins that are used by BACTERIOPHAGES to incorporate their DNA into the DNA of the "host" bacteria. They are DNA-binding proteins that function in genetic recombination as well as in transcriptional and translational regulation.Polysaccharides, Bacterial: Polysaccharides found in bacteria and in capsules thereof.

*  Culture conditions' impact on succinate production by a high succinate producing Escherichia coli st
succinate producing Escherichia coli strain - Mart nez - 2011 - ... succinate producing Escherichia coli strain Authors Irene Mart nez,...
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/btpr.641/full
*  Sav-A-Caf Scours & Pne Conc 20 Pound(55-7532-0520), 55-7532-0520, Water SolublesUntitled
Enteritis Caused By Escherichia Coli And Bacterial Pneumonia Cause By ... And Control Of Colibacillosis Caused By Escherichia Coli...
http://tscpets.com/bci-1x633155.html
*  gnd - 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, decarboxylating - Escherichia coli - gnd gene & proteinAnnot
decarboxylating OS=Escherichia coli GN=gnd PE=3 SV=1...
http://uniprot.org/uniprot/P37754
*  KEGG PATHWAY: Phosphotransferase system (PTS) - Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris A76
alphabet >----- Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 Escherichia coli K-12 ... W3110 Escherichia coli K-12 DH10B Escherichia coli BW2952 Escherichia coli K-12 MDS42 Escherichia coli O157:...
http://genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?llr02060
*  RCSB PDB for 4I6M
Expression System : Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli. Show All Chains...
http://rcsb.org/pdb/explore/images.do?structureId=4I6M
*  Binary options youtube і
sporogenes Escherichia coli Staphylococcus aureus INOCULUM ... Uninoculated tube Escherichia coli ATCC® 25922 Clostridium sporogenes...
http://buhservisplus.ru/binary-options-youtube--5.html
*  Site - cueOSite cueO
CGSC Coli Genetic Stock Center. E coli Genetic ... at Yale CGSC, The Coli Genetic Stock Center. Pay an invoice. ... PDFs Other Links E. coli Links Other Stock Collections Other Bio...
http://cgsc.biology.yale.edu/Site.php?ID=77690
*  Increasing the Acetyl-CoA Pool in the Presence of Overexpressed Phosphoenolpyruvate Ca
in Escherichia coli. Close The Infona portal uses cookies, ... in Escherichia coli. Contributors Fields of science...
https://infona.pl/resource/bwmeta1.element.acs-doi-10_1021_bp049843a
*  EC 3.2.2.20
dna in escherichia coli cf ec methylated dna ... in escherichia coli which release primarily...
http://chem.qmul.ac.uk/iubmb/enzyme/EC3/2/2/20.html
*  Investigating the effect of four antibiotic agents on gram positive and gram negative bacteria. - GC
and Escherichia coli. After transferring the antibiotics to ... placed. Escherichia coli Penicillin G From my research, ... no inhibition of E.coli. Penicillin G can only inhibit cell...
http://markedbyteachers.com/gcse/science/investigating-the-effect-of-four-antibiotic-agents-on-gram-positive-and-gram-negative-bacteria.html
*  Site - attLAMSite attLAM
CGSC Coli Genetic Stock Center. E coli Genetic ... at Yale CGSC, The Coli Genetic Stock Center. Pay an invoice. ... PDFs Other Links E. coli Links Other Stock Collections Other Bio...
http://cgsc.biology.yale.edu/Site.php?ID=980
*  Mutation - serC731(del)::kanMutation serC731(del)::kan
cgsc coli genetic stock center e coli ... at yale cgsc the coli genetic stock center pay an invoice ... other links e coli links other stock collections other...
http://cgsc.biology.yale.edu/Mutation.php?ID=102918
*  Search Results ((keywords en:CARBON-13 ISOTOPE)) - ETH E-Collection
in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis Fischer, Eliane...
http://e-collection.library.ethz.ch/list.php?browse=&cat=quick_filter&sort_by=score&key-1=T_Keywords_EN&w1=CARBON-13 ISOTOPE&lang=de
*  Escherichia coli σ70 senses sequence and conformation of the promoter spacer region - WRAP: Warwi
Escherichia coli σ70 senses sequence and conformation of the promoter spacer region - WRAP: Warwick Research Archive Portal. University of Warwick Publications service WRAP Highlight your research. Browse WRAP by Year. Browse Publications service by Year. Browse Publications service by Subject. Escherichia coli σ70 senses sequence and conformation of the promoter spacer region. 2011 Escherichia coli σ70 senses sequence and conformation of the promoter spacer region. Nucleic Acids Research, Vol.39 No.12. PDF WRAP_Singh_Nucl._Acids_Res.-2011-Singh-nar_gkr080.pdf - Published Version - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview , Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader. Library of Congress Subject Headings LCSH : Escherichia coli -- Genetics, RNA polymerases, Promoters Genetics. Journal or Publication Title: Nucleic Acids Research. Microbiol., 57, 441–466. 5 Barne,K.A., Bown,J.A., Busby,S.J. 1997 Region 2.5 of the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase sigma70 subunit is responsible for the recognition of the ‘extended-10’ motif at prom...
http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/35918/
*  Method 1603: Escherichia coli (E. coli) in Water by Membrane Filtration Using Modified membrane-Ther
Method 1603: Escherichia coli E. coli in Water by Membrane Filtration Using Modified membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar Modified mTEC. US EPA. Method 1603: Escherichia coli E. coli in Water by Membrane Filtration Using Modified membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar Modified mTEC. Jump to main content. Water. Recent Additions. Contact Us Search: All EPA This Area. You are here: EPA Home. Water Online Publications Method 1603: Escherichia coli E. coli in Water by Membrane Filtration Using Modified membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar Modified mTEC. Title Index. EPA Number. Audience Type. Document Type. Keyword Index. Office. New Publications. Title Keyword All. About Ordering. Method 1603: Escherichia coli E. coli in Water by Membrane Filtration Using Modified membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar Modified mTEC. EPA Number: 821R02023. Date of Publication: September, 2002. Pages: 15. Audience concerned citizens, industry. Publication Comments. Available from:. WEB http://epa.g...
http://yosemite.epa.gov/water/owrccatalog.nsf/065ca07e299b464685256ce50075c11a/01ac69bf12b8ec8e85256d6a006a563b!OpenDocument
*  Method 1103.1: Escherichia coli (E. coli) in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane-Thermotoler
Method 1103.1: Escherichia coli E. coli in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar mTEC. US EPA. Method 1103.1: Escherichia coli E. coli in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar mTEC. Jump to main content. Water. Recent Additions. Contact Us Search: All EPA This Area. You are here: EPA Home. Water Online Publications Method 1103.1: Escherichia coli E. coli in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar mTEC. Title Index. EPA Number. Audience Type. Document Type. Keyword Index. Office. New Publications. Title Keyword All. About Ordering. Method 1103.1: Escherichia coli E. coli in Water by Membrane Filtration Using membrane-Thermotolerant Escherichia coli Agar mTEC. EPA Number: 821R04024. Date of Publication: April, 2005. Pages: 45. Audience concerned citizens, industry, Regulated Community, Scientific Community, State and local government, Teachers or Educators. Publication Comments. Availab...
http://yosemite.epa.gov/water/owrccatalog.nsf/065ca07e299b464685256ce50075c11a/89042e7f96d9b9cd852570600070a6ec!OpenDocument
*  Escherichia coli/Codon usage - OpenWetWare
... Escherichia coli/Codon usage From OpenWetWare Difference between revisions Jump to: navigation, search Revision as of 09:49, 15 August 2012 view source Janet B. Matsen Talk. contribs. Revision as of 11:40, 15 August 2012 view source Austin J. Che Talk. contribs. Next diff →. - Escherichia coli K12 : 5054 CDS's 1603901 codons. + Source : This is reformatted from http://www.kazusa.or.jp/codon/. + Note that their numbers have changed so they no longer match up exactly. + Escherichia coli K12 : 5054 CDS's 1603901 codons. { class=sortable border=1. { class=sortable border=1. Revision as of 11:40, 15 August 2012. Source: This is reformatted from http://www.kazusa.or.jp/codon/. Note that their numbers have changed so they no longer match up exactly. Escherichia coli K12 : 5054 CDS's 1603901 codons. Glycine GGG 17628.00 10.99 0.15. Glycine GGA 12696.00 7.92 0.11. Glycine GGT 39862.00 24.85 0.34. Glycine GGC 47212.00 29.44 0.40. Valine GTG 42097.00 26.25 0.37. Valine GTA 17443.00 10.88 0.15. Valine GTT 29487.00 1...
http://openwetware.org/index.php?title=Escherichia_coli/Codon_usage&oldid=618436&diff=prev
*  Metabolites | Free Full-Text | Regulation Systems of Bacteria such as Escherichia coli in Response
Regulation Systems of Bacteria such as Escherichia coli in Response to Nutrient Limitation and Environmental Stresses. Review Regulation Systems of Bacteria such as Escherichia coli in Response to Nutrient Limitation and Environmental Stresses Kazuyuki Shimizu 1, 2 1 Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, Iizuka 820-8502, Japan; E-Mail: shimi@bio.kyutech.ac.jp ; Tel.: +81-090-9729-9673; Fax: +81-948-29-7801. Received: 9 September 2013; in revised form: 18 November 2013 / Accepted: 6 December 2013 / Published: 30 December 2013 Abstract : An overview was made to understand the regulation system of a bacterial cell such as Escherichia coli in response to nutrient limitation such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, sulfur, ion sources, and environmental stresses such as oxidative stress, acid shock, heat shock, and solvent stresses. Several attempts have been made to improve the tolerance to biofuels, where biofuel export systems, heat shock proteins, and membrane modifications have been considered. In E.coli, pre-...
http://mdpi.com/2218-1989/4/1/1/htm
*  Anti -Escherichia coli, Enterotoxin A - United States Biological
... Login. Email. Password. Forgot your password. New User. Remember me. Home. Distributors. Technical. About. Register. Antibodies. Biochemicals. Culture Media. Custom Services. Growth Factors. Bioassay Kits. Lectins. Molecular Biology. Serum, Tissues. Protocols. Newsletter. About Us. Contact. . You are here: Home. Antibodies. Antibodies-Infectious Disease E. coli. Anti -Escherichia coli, Enterotoxin A Anti -Escherichia coli, Enterotoxin A. Pricing For pricing information, USA customers sign in. Outside USA. Please contact your distributor for pricing. Specifications Clone. Host. Grade Applications Monoclonal Mouse Purified E. Catalog # E3500-43. Applications Suitable for use in ELISA. Other applications not tested. Recommended Dilutions Optimal dilutions to be determined by the researcher. Storage and Stability May be stored at 4 C for short-term only. Aliquot to avoid repeated freezing and thawing. Store at -20 C. Aliquots are stable for 12 months. For maximum recovery of product, centrifuge the original ...
http://usbio.net/item/E3500-43
*  Genome Wide Assessment in Escherichia coli Reveals Time Dependent Nanotoxicity Paradigms.
... BioMedSearch. Document Detail. Genome Wide Assessment in Escherichia coli Reveals Time Dependent Nanotoxicity Paradigms. MedLine Citation:. The use of high throughput experimentation enables probeing the nano-mediated toxicity on a genome wide level, thus uncovering their novel mechanisms and paradigms. Herein, we investigate the toxicity of zinc containing nanomaterials Zn-eNMs using a time-resolved high throughput screening HTS methodology in an arrayed Escherichia coli genome-wide knockout library. The library was screened against nanoscale zero-valent zinc nZn , nanoscale zinc oxide nZnO , and zinc chloride ZnCl2 salt for reference. Through sequential screening over 24 hours, our method identified 173 sensitive clones from diverse biological pathways, which fell into two general groups: early and late responders. Our results suggest bacterial toxicity mechanisms vary with time, and change from pathways related to general metabolic function, transport, signaling, and metal ion homeostasis during earli...
http://biomedsearch.com/nih/Genome-Wide-Assessment-in-Escherichia/23039911.html
*  Shiga Toxine Escherichia Coli
... escherichia coli productrice de shiga toxines stec est une bactérie responsable des colites hémorragiques et d épidémies de syndrome hémolytique et urémique rivas m miliwebsky e chinen i deza n leotta ga the epidemiology of hemolytic uremic syndrome in argentina diagnosis of the etiologic agent reservoirs and routes of transmission medicina b aires suppl infections zoonotiques on en a isolé diverses souches et sérotypes mora a blanco m blanco je dahbi g lópez c justel p alonso mp echeita a bernárdez mi gonzález ea et al serotypes virulence genes and intimin types of shiga toxin verocytotoxin producing escherichia coli isolates from minced beef in lugo spain from through bmc microbiol mar epub dans le monde plus ou moins virulents oliveira mg brito jr gomes ta guth be vieira ma naves zv vaz tm irino k diversity of virulence profiles of shiga toxin producing escherichia coli serotypes in food producing animals in brazil int j food microbiol sep epub plusieurs facteurs de risque et facteurs de virulence dit...
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiga_Toxine_Escherichia_Coli
*  ARS | Publication request: DETECTION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 USING IMMUNO BEADS ARS : Research
ARS. Publication request: DETECTION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 USING IMMUNO BEADS ARS : Research. Page Banner. ARS Home. About ARS. Search for This. National Programs. Research Projects. Scientific Manuscripts. International Programs. Scientific Software/Models. Databases & Datasets. Scientific Collaborations. Find a person. Find a location. Find an office at headquarters. Newsroom. News Home. Podcasts. Careers. Careers at ARS Info. Site Map. Related Topics Programs and Projects. ARS National Programs. Search for a research project. ARS Office of International Research Programs. ARS Office of International Research Programs Regional Contacts. ARS International Research Partnerships. Title: DETECTION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 USING IMMUNO BEADS Authors. Gehring, Andrew. Submitted to: Meeting Abstract Publication Type: Proceedings Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2005 Publication Date: October 23, 2005 Citation: Tu, S., Gehring, A.G. Detection of escherichia coli 0157:h7 using immuno beads. Technic...
http://ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?SEQ_NO_115=185178
*  Escherichia coli MS 182-1
... p>An evidence describes the source of an annotation, e.g. an experiment that has been published in the scientific literature, an orthologous protein, a record from another database, etc. /p> p> a href="/manual/evidences">More… /a> /p>. Taxonomy. x UniProtKB Protein knowledgebase UniParc Sequence archive Help Help pages, FAQs, UniProtKB manual, documents, news archive and Biocuration projects. UniRef Sequence clusters Proteomes Protein sets from fully sequenced genomes Annotation systems Systems used to automatically annotate proteins with high accuracy: UniRule Manually curated rules. SAAS System generated rules. Supporting data Select one of the options below to target your search: Literature citations. Taxonomy. Keywords. Subcellular locations. Cross-referenced databases. Human diseases. BLAST. Align. Retrieve/ID mapping. Help. You are using a version of browser that may not display all the features of this website. Please consider upgrading your browser. Taxonomy - Escherichia c...
http://uniprot.org/taxonomy/749545
*  Pathogenic E. coli
... Looking for the most current news, updates, and articles relating to microbiology, go to The American Society for Microbiology educational website. Microbe World. Web Review of Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology. "The Good, the Bad, and the Deadly". Tag words: Escherichia coli, E. coli, E. coli O157:H7, enteropathogenic E. coli, EPEC, enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC, LT toxin, ST toxin, vero toxin, shiga toxin, food poisoning, gastroenteritis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, HUS, neonatal meningitis, urinary tract infection, UTI. Escherichia coli Kingdom: Bacteria Phylum: Proteobacteria Class: Gamma Proteobacteria Order: Enterobacteriales Family: Enterobacteriaceae Genus: Escherichia Species: E. coli. Print this Page To search the entire book, enter a term or phrase in the form below. Custom Search. Pathogenic E. coli page 1 This chapter has 4 pages Kenneth Todar, PhD. E coli O157:H7. Phase contrast image of cells immobilized on an agar-coated slide. William Ghiorse, Department of Microbiology, Cornell Uni...
http://textbookofbacteriology.net/e.coli.html
*  Site - tyrRSite tyrR
CGSC Coli Genetic Stock Center. E coli Genetic Resources at Yale CGSC, The Coli Genetic Stock Center. The Database Acknowledgment of Support Searching the CGSC Database Help With Query Forms Help with Genetic Nomenclature Strain Query Mutation Query Gene/Site Query Gene Product Query Reference Query Query Help How to Request Strains or Information Contact Information Charges How We Ship Strains Strains Not Found. Other CGSC Information FAQ on Procedures Current Working Map 1998 MMBR Map 1998 MMBR Gene List Map Diagrams PDFs Other Links E. coli Links Other Stock Collections Other Bio Links Yale Web. Site - tyrR Site tyrR Site tyrR Name: tyrR Type: Gene. External Database Links: Host Site Page Links NCBI/GenBank M12114. Pittard 1969. J.Bacteriol. Repression of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli K12. J.Bacteriol. Pittard 1971. Regulation of tyrosine biosynthesis in Escherichia coli K-12: isolation and characterization of operator mutants. J.Bacteriol. Pittard 1980. J.Bacteriol. D-amino acid deh...
http://cgsc.biology.yale.edu/Site.php?ID=55
*  Escherichia coli sRNA
... escherichia coli contains a number of small rnas located in intergenic region s of its genome the presence of at least of these has been verified experimentally potential srna encoding loci were identified computationally using the qrna program these loci will include false positives so the number of srna genes in e coli is likely to be less than a computational screen based on promoter sequences recognised by the sigma factor sigma and on rho independent terminators predicted putative srna genes of these were verified experimentally by northern blotting the experimentally verified srnas included the well characterised srnas rpra and ryhb many of the srnas identified in this screen including rpra ryhb srab and sral are only expressed in the stationary phase of bacterial cell growth a screen for srna genes based on homology to salmonella and klebsiella identified candidate srna genes from this set of candidate genes microarray analysis and northern blotting confirmed the existence of previously undescribe...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escherichia_coli_sRNA
*  Site - mukBSite mukB
CGSC Coli Genetic Stock Center. E coli Genetic Resources at Yale CGSC, The Coli Genetic Stock Center. About the CGSC CGSC Home:. The Database Acknowledgment of Support Searching the CGSC Database Help With Query Forms Help with Genetic Nomenclature Strain Query Mutation Query Gene/Site Query Gene Product Query Reference Query Query Help How to Request Strains or Information Contact Information Charges How We Ship Strains Strains Not Found. Other CGSC Information FAQ on Procedures Current Working Map 1998 MMBR Map 1998 MMBR Gene List Map Diagrams PDFs Other Links E. coli Links Other Stock Collections Other Bio Links Yale Web. Site - mukB Site mukB Site mukB Name: mukB Type: Gene. External Database Links: Host Site Page Links EcoGene.org EG10618. mutants produce anucleate cells and are ts for colony formation. Niki, H., A. Ogura, S. Hiraga 1991. The new gene mukB codes for a 177 kd protein with coiled-coil domains involved in chromosome partitioning of E. coli. 10:183-193 Hiraga, S., H. Niki, R. coli. 142:189-1...
http://cgsc.biology.yale.edu/Site.php?ID=31516
*  Site - hlpASite hlpA
CGSC Coli Genetic Stock Center. E coli Genetic Resources at Yale CGSC, The Coli Genetic Stock Center. The Database Acknowledgment of Support Searching the CGSC Database Help With Query Forms Help with Genetic Nomenclature Strain Query Mutation Query Gene/Site Query Gene Product Query Reference Query Query Help How to Request Strains or Information Contact Information Charges How We Ship Strains Strains Not Found. Other CGSC Information FAQ on Procedures Current Working Map 1998 MMBR Map 1998 MMBR Gene List Map Diagrams PDFs Other Links E. coli Links Other Stock Collections Other Bio Links Yale Web. Site - hlpA Site hlpA Site hlpA Name: hlpA Type: Gene. firA. ompH Salmonella map. skp Orf upstream from firA, see Dicker, Thome refs. Mnemonic: histone-like protein Left End Point: 4.32 Right End Point: 4.33 Products: histone-like protein HLP-I cytoplasmic. OmpH, outer membrane protein. External Database Links: Host Site Page Links EcoGene.org EG10455. Comment: histone-like protein HLP-I BH1 ; DNA-binding. hlpA = s...
http://cgsc.biology.yale.edu/Site.php?ID=18241
*  Escherichia coli (molecular biology)
Escherichia coli molecular biology. Escherichia coli molecular biology. The descendants of two isolates, K-12 and B strain, are used routinely in molecular biology as both a tool and a model organism. Diversity of Escherichia coli History Strains Escherich's isolate. Clifton to study nitrogen metabolism who deposited it in ATCC strain and lent it to Edward Tatum for his tryptophan biosynthesis experiments,. 8 Strains derived from MG1655 include DH1, parent of DH5α and in turn of DH10β rebranded as TOP10 by Invitrogen. B strain. coli B was by Delbrück and Luria in 1942 in their study of bacteriophages T1 and T7. coli B strain, known then as 'Bacillus coli', originated from Félix d'Herelle from the Institut Pasteur in Paris around 1918 who studied bacteriophages,. who claimed that it originated from Collection of the Institut Pasteur, d'Herelle, F. The strain of d'Herelle was passed to Jules Bordet, Director of the Institut Pasteur du Brabant in Bruxelles. coli Bordet,. coli P.C., who passed it to Delbrück an...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escherichia_coli_(molecular_biology)
*  Site - arcBSite arcB
CGSC Coli Genetic Stock Center. E coli Genetic Resources at Yale CGSC, The Coli Genetic Stock Center. About the CGSC CGSC Home:. The Database Acknowledgment of Support Searching the CGSC Database Help With Query Forms Help with Genetic Nomenclature Strain Query Mutation Query Gene/Site Query Gene Product Query Reference Query Query Help How to Request Strains or Information Contact Information Charges How We Ship Strains Strains Not Found. Other CGSC Information FAQ on Procedures Current Working Map 1998 MMBR Map 1998 MMBR Gene List Map Diagrams PDFs Other Links E. coli Links Other Stock Collections Other Bio Links Yale Web. Site - arcB Site arcB Site arcB Name: arcB Type: Gene. Mnemonic: Aerobic pathways control Left End Point: 72.17 Right End Point: 72.22 Products: sensor component of 2-component ArcBA sensor-regulator system. regulatory gene phosphorylates and activates arcA. Priority: 0 4 Alleles of This Gene arcB40 del-ins ::cat. arcB41 del-ins,::FRT. arcB738 del ::kan. External Database Links: Host Site...
http://cgsc.biology.yale.edu/Site.php?ID=29063
*  Biochemical dissection of the ATPase TraB, the VirB4 homologue of the Escherichia coli pKM101 conju
... gation machinery - BIROn - Birkbeck Institutional Research Online. BIROn - Birkbeck Institutional Research Online. Browse by Year. Browse by School. Browse by Person. Browse by Journal. Browse by Types. Login. Create Account. Biochemical dissection of the ATPase TraB, the VirB4 homologue of the Escherichia coli pKM101 conjugation machinery. Durand, E. and Oomen, C. and Waksman, Gabriel 2010 Biochemical dissection of the ATPase TraB, the VirB4 homologue of the Escherichia coli pKM101 conjugation machinery. Full text not available from this repository. Type IV secretion T4S systems are involved in several secretion processes, including secretion of virulence factors, such as toxins or transforming molecules, or bacterial conjugation whereby two mating bacteria exchange genetic material. T4S systems are generally composed of 12 protein components, three of which, termed VirB4, VirB11, and VirD4, are ATPases. VirB4 is the largest protein of the T4S system, is known to play a central role, and interacts with m...
http://eprints.bbk.ac.uk/3042/
*  Published Escherichia coli SWISS-2DPAGE map
published escherichia coli swiss dpage map swiss dpage home contact published escherichia coli swiss dpage map luisa tonella brad j walsh jean charles sanchez keli ou marc r wilkins margaret tyler s verine frutiger andrew a gooley ioana pescaru ron d appel jun x yan amos bairoch christine hoogland fabienne s morch graham j hughes keith l williams denis f hochstrasser escherichia coli swiss dpage database update electrophoresis the following figures are available the figure captions are those of the publication courtesy vch verlagsgesellchaft mbh d weinheim germany figure a high m r range of the e coli gel image with scales of kda and a p i between and b low m r range of the e coli gel image with scales of kda p i between and for both figures red labels highlight polypeptides identified by gel comparison with the neidhardt d maps green labels represent proteins identified by a combination of several techniques including gel comparison microsequencing and or amino acid composition analysis blue labels show newl...
http://world-2dpage.expasy.org/swiss-2dpage/docs/publi/ecoli.html
*  EcoGene Escherichia coli K-12 GenePage Master Page of osmC
EcoGene. Escherichia coli K-12 GenePage Master Page of osmC. GenePage for the osmC gene of Escherichia coli K-12. Bacteriome: osmC. CDD-COG: COG1764. CGSC: CG32184. ChemGen Gene Correlations: osmC. ChemGen Growth Data: osmC. CMR: P0C0L2. Colibri: osmC. COMBREX: 946043. DDBJ: AAC74555. Doodle: b1482. ECDC: CG01120. EchoBASE: EB0674. EchoLOCATION: EB0674. ECID: P0C0L2. ECMDB: P0C0L2. EcoliWiki: osmC. eggNOG: P0C0L2. EMBL: AAC74555. ENZYME: 1.11.1.15. eSOL: JW1477. Gene-Profiles.org: osmC. Genevestigator: P0C0L2. GenExpDB: b1482. GenoBaseMG: b1482. Genome3D: P0C0L2. GenomeReviews: P0C0L2. GenPept-GenBank: AAC74555. GenPept-RefSeq: NP 415999.1. GenProtEC: b1482. GORBI: 946043. GREMLIN: P0C0L2. iHOP: 946043. Inparanoid: NP 415999.1. iProClass: P0C0L2. iRefWeb: 946043. MicrobesOnline: P0C0L2. MiST: 1582763. ModBase: P0C0L2. OMA: P0C0L2. Orthology.org: 50825. PDB-UniProt: P0C0L2. PrFEct-Predict: osmC. ProteinOntology: 000023468. ProteinOntology: 000024958. ProteomeFolding at YRC: P0C0L2. ProtMap COG: COG1764#NC 0009...
http://ecogene.org/old/geneinfo.php?eg_id=EG10680
*  arcB - Aerobic respiration control sensor protein ArcB - Escherichia coli (strain K12)
arcB - Aerobic respiration control sensor protein ArcB - Escherichia coli strain K12. p>An evidence describes the source of an annotation, e.g. an experiment that has been published in the scientific literature, an orthologous protein, a record from another database, etc. /p> p> a href="/manual/evidences">More… /a> /p>. Skip Header. UniProtKB. x UniProtKB Protein knowledgebase UniParc Sequence archive Help Help pages, FAQs, UniProtKB manual, documents, news archive and Biocuration projects. UniRef Sequence clusters Proteomes Protein sets from fully sequenced genomes Annotation systems Systems used to automatically annotate proteins with high accuracy: UniRule Manually curated rules. SAAS System generated rules. Supporting data Select one of the options below to target your search: Literature citations. Taxonomy. Keywords. Subcellular locations. Cross-referenced databases. Human diseases. Advanced Search. x Searching in. Home. BLAST. Align. Retrieve/ID mapping. Contact. Help. You are usi...
http://uniprot.org/uniprot/P0AEC3
*  World-2DPAGE Constellation: SWISS-2DPAGE - map viewer
Identification Methods: * PATHOLOGICAL LEVEL, MAPPING: {Mi,Gm}. Identification Methods: * MAPPING: {Mi}. Identification Methods: * MAPPING: {Mi}. Identification Methods: * MAPPING: {Mi}. Identification Methods: * MAPPING: {Mi}. Identification Methods: * MAPPING: {Mi}. Identification Methods: * MAPPING: {Mi}. Identification Methods: * MAPPING: {Mi}. Identification Methods: * MAPPING: {Mi}. Identification Methods: * MAPPING: {Mi}. Identification Methods: * MAPPING: {Mi}. Identification Methods: * MAPPING: {Mi}. Switch to Gel: Homo sapiens Human -- LIVER HUMAN { Liver } ARABIDOPSIS { Arabidopsis thaliana } DICTYSLUG { Dictyostelium discoideum } ECOLI { Escherichia coli } ECOLI-DIGE4.5-6.5 { Escherichia coli DIGE 4.5-6.5 } ECOLI4-5 { Escherichia coli 4-5 } ECOLI4.5-5.5 { Escherichia coli 4.5-5.5 } ECOLI5-6 { Escherichia coli 5-6 } ECOLI5.5-6.7 { Escherichia coli 5.5-6.7 } ECOLI6-11 { Escherichia coli 6-11 } ECOLI6-9 { Escherichia coli 6-9 } CEC HUMAN { Colorectal epithelia cells } CSF HUMAN { Cerebrospinal Fluid ...
http://world-2dpage.expasy.org/swiss-2dpage/viewer&map=LIVER_HUMAN&ac=all
*  envZ - Osmolarity sensor protein EnvZ - Escherichia coli (strain K12)
envZ - Osmolarity sensor protein EnvZ - Escherichia coli strain K12. p>An evidence describes the source of an annotation, e.g. an experiment that has been published in the scientific literature, an orthologous protein, a record from another database, etc. /p> p> a href="/manual/evidences">More… /a> /p>. Skip Header. UniProtKB. x UniProtKB Protein knowledgebase UniParc Sequence archive Help Help pages, FAQs, UniProtKB manual, documents, news archive and Biocuration projects. UniRef Sequence clusters Proteomes Protein sets from fully sequenced genomes Annotation systems Systems used to automatically annotate proteins with high accuracy: UniRule Manually curated rules. SAAS System generated rules. Supporting data Select one of the options below to target your search: Literature citations. Taxonomy. Keywords. Subcellular locations. Cross-referenced databases. Human diseases. Advanced Search. x Searching in. Home. BLAST. Align. Retrieve/ID mapping. Contact. Help. You are using a version of b...
http://uniprot.org/uniprot/P0AEJ4
*  Multiple pathways for regulation of σS (RpoS) stability in Escherichia coli via the action of multi
2008 , Multiple pathways for regulation of S RpoS stability in Escherichia coli via the action of multiple anti-adaptors. Get PDF 571K Get PDF 571K. In Escherichia coli , one of these adaptor proteins is RssB, also called MviA in Salmonella Bearson et al ., 1996 ; Muffler et al ., 1996 ; Pratt and Silhavy, 1996 ; Zhou and Gottesman, 1998. coli and Salmonella typhimurium As discussed above, there are still unidentified com ponents involved in the regulation of S degradation. c Gene descriptions adapted from Colibri web site http://genolist.pasteur.fr/Colibri. iraD and appY were cloned under the control of the inducible promoter P T5/lacO described in Experimental procedures to create pQE- iraD and pQE- appY. S half-life was measured in exponential phase in a strain with iraP deleted and carrying the vector or one of the plasmids pQE- iraD , pQE- appY or pQE- iraM. S half-life was determined in the strain AB006 iraP::kn containing A : pQE-80L as a vector control or pQE80- iraD yjiD ; or B : pQE- iraM ycgW or pQ...
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2008.06146.x/full
*  Locus of enterocyte effacement
... the locus of enterocyte effacement lee is a moderately conserved pathogenicity island consisting of base pairs in the bacteria escherichia coli genome the lee encodes the type iii secretion system and associated chaperones and effector proteins responsible for attaching and effacing ae lesions in the large intestine these proteins include intimin tir espc espf esph and map protein the lee has a g c ratio category cell biology...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locus_of_enterocyte_effacement
*  2D gels, E coli proteins
d gels e coli proteins d gels e coli proteins pete dunten dunten at onyx bmc uu se wed jul est previous message snorkel combo and wheel next message d gels e coli proteins messages sorted by i know swiss prot provides links to d gels for proteins from several mammalian cell lines but not my favorite organism lowly e coli is there a web site or compilation of mw and pi for e coli proteins thanks pete previous message snorkel combo and wheel next message d gels e coli proteins messages sorted by more information about the proteins mailing list...
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/proteins/1995-July/002949.html
*  PLOS Pathogens: The Genetic Basis of Escherichia coli Pathoadaptation to Macrophages
... Journal Archive. Other Article Types. Article-Level Metrics. Journal Information. Open Access Peer-reviewed Research Article. Article. A Fitness increase of M1 to M6 populations relative to the ancestral clone at 285 white bars generations and 450 black bars generations. SCVs clones SCV_M1_D8 and SCV_M3_D5 exhibited a fitness advantage relative to the ancestral strain, inside MΦ, as assayed 2 hours after infection. Mucoidy, the trait evolved in the MUC clones, is also a trait observed in certain infections, for example in Pseudomonas aeruginosa or E. E coli evolved in vitro to escape MΦ show increased virulence in vivo. We tested whether adaptation of evolved MUC clones to escape MΦ is associated with increased virulence. Overall our results show that the MUC clones, which overproduce colanic acid and dominated the bacteria populations during the interaction with MΦ, exhibit increased virulence. coli ability to produce colanic acid, in keeping with the observation that MUC clones produce high levels of c...
http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1003802
*  Tufts Journal: Features: E. coli treatment
... Features. Briefs. People. Calendar. In This Corner. Ask The Professor /. Archives. Contact Us /. Tufts Homepage. E. coli treatment Veterinary researchers use human antibodies to combat virulent bacteria by Donna Boynton Researchers at the Cummings School have developed a way to treat the early onset of illnesses caused by a virulent strain of E. coli bacteria. Infectious disease expert Saul Tzipori has been working for eight years to find a treatment for the E. coli strain that was linked to the recent illnesses caused by bagged spinach. PAUL KAPTEYN/TELEGRAM & GAZETTE. Dr. Saul Tzipori, an infectious disease expert, and a team of researchers on the Grafton campus have been working for eight years on a human antibody treatment for Escherichia coli 0157, or E. coli 0157. The treatment is now being produced by Worcester-based Biovest for clinical trials in humans that are expected to take place by spring at Tufts-New England Medical Center. The announcement of the treatment comes at a time when scores of p...
http://tuftsjournal.tufts.edu/archive/2006/november/features/ecoli.shtml
*  Escherichia coli
... coli". '''''Escherichia coli''''' ; also known as '''''E. coli''''' is a Gram-negative , facultatively anaerobic , rod-shaped bacterium of the genus '' Escherichia '' that is commonly found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms endotherms. 9 and fecal–oral transmission is the major route through which pathogenic strains of the bacterium cause disease. Cell cycle. Diversity Serotypes. Neotype strain. coli'' strains. coli-related information. coli''. coli'' is a Gram-negative bacteria which do not retain crystal violet dye , facultative anaerobic that makes ATP by aerobic respiration if oxygen is present, but is capable of switching to fermentation or anaerobic respiration if oxygen is absent and nonsporulating bacterium. coli'' occurs at 37 °C 98.6 °F , but some laboratory strains can multiply at temperatures of up to 49 °C 120.2 °F. It can however, continue to grow in the absence of oxygen using fermentation or anaerobic respiration. Cell cycle. Cell cycle. At the fastest growth rates, replica...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escherichia_coli
*  marker for pFQ148
... Jayakumar R jr at caticsuf.CATI.CSUFresno.EDU. Thu Jan 9 01:13:57 EST 1997. Previous message: Looking for antibodies against TGEV S-protein Next message: About Escherichia coli B Messages sorted by:. Dear newsgroup I hsd earlier sent this same question onthe net. But since the server was down for a week, I could not receive any messages whatsoever. So please mail any reply fast. I need it very urgently. Does anyone know the selectable marker for the plasmid pFQ148 genbank L41344 which contains genes nifV, nifH, nifD, nifK and niE. The work was done by specq. A and Normand, P. unpublished, 1996. If the authors read this, please let me know. All help will be duly acknowledged. Yours JAYAKUMAR. Previous message: Looking for antibodies against TGEV S-protein Next message: About Escherichia coli B Messages sorted by:. More information about the Microbio mailing list....
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/microbio/1997-January/007910.html
*  Looking for a real good E. coli foto
looking for a real good e coli foto looking for a real good e coli foto wolfgang schechinger wgschech at med uni tuebingen de sat may est previous message just curious about a peculiar observation next message just curious about a peculiar observation messages sorted by hi folks i m looking for a foto showing some e coli what i have in my mind is something like hoechst were using in their ads for genetically engeneered insuline some time ago i d be grateful for any urls thanks to all wolfgang wolfgang schechinger university of tuebingen email wgschech at med uni tuebingen de http www medizin uni tuebingen de wgschech research htm public pgp key is avilable on request previous message just curious about a peculiar observation next message just curious about a peculiar observation messages sorted by more information about the methods mailing list...
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/methods/1997-May/057772.html
*  ..
New Tool Recombineers the DNA of E. coli .....
http://genengnews.com/keywordsandtools/print/1/12836/
*  List of strains of Escherichia coli
... escherichia coli is a well studied bacterium that was first identified by theodor escherich after whom it was later named strains innocuous escherichia coli strain nissle also known as mutaflor laboratory e coli k one of two laboratory strains innocuous clifton wild type w dh αe dam dcm strain escherichia coli b the other of the two lab strains from which all lab substrains originate escherichia coli bl de pathogenic enterotoxigenic e coli etec enteropathogenic e coli epec enteroinvasive e coli eiec enterohemorrhagic e coli ehec uropathogenic e coli upec verotoxin producing e coli e coli o h is an enterohemorrhagic strain also north american e coli outbreak e coli o h also e coli o h outbreak escherichia coli o escherichia coli o h escherichia coli k meningitis e coli o escherichia coli nc shigella shigella flexneri shigella dysenteriae shigella boydii shigella sonnei references category enterobacteria category escherichia coli category gram negative bacteria...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_strains_of_Escherichia_coli
*  E Coli (Bacteria)
E Coli Bacteria. E Coli. Real Estate. Video. {"type":"article","show header text":false,"header":"ARTICLES ABOUT E COLI BACTERIA ","query":" des = \"E COLI BACTERIA \" ","search query":" subject:\"E COLI \\ BACTERIA\\ \" ","num search articles":"10","show summary":true,"show byline":true,"show pub date":true,"hide thumbnails":false,"show kicker":false,"show title":false,"show related topics":true,"show rad links":true,"show subtopics":true,"exclude topics":"E COLI BACTERIA ","more on header":"MORE ON E COLI BACTERIA AND:","alternate index subidx":"","show thumbnails":true}. MORE ON E COLI BACTERIA AND: Editorials, Hamburgers, Cattle, Factory Farming, Meat, Consumer Protection, Food Contamination and Poisoning, Consumer Reports, Pew Charitable Trusts, Beef, Food and Drug Administration, Agriculture Department, E Coli Bacteria, Salmonella Bacteria. MORE ON E COLI BACTERIA AND: Food Contamination and Poisoning, Salmonella Bacteria, E Coli Bacteria, United States, Law and Legislation, Agriculture Department. MORE...
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/e/e_coli_bacteria/index.html?query=Labeling and Labels&field=des&match=exact
*  Isolation, Cloning and Expression of Recombinant Human Renin in Escherichia Coli System - Universi
... ti Putra Malaysia Institutional Repository. Admin Login. Search. Faculty and Institute. Admin Login. Isolation, Cloning and Expression of Recombinant Human Renin in Escherichia Coli System. Ng, Chyan Leong 2002 Isolation, Cloning and Expression of Recombinant Human Renin in Escherichia Coli System. Masters thesis, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Therefore, recombinant protein technologies are used to produce the recombinant human renin protein. In this study, the full-length human renin coding gene REN was isolated from the human kidney cDNA library by using the polymerase chain reaction PCR technique. The PCR amplified REN gene was cloned into pCR-Blunt cloning vector. The REN gene was cloned into two different E. coli expression vectors, pRSETB and pGEX4T l, to express the recombinant protein. coli strains BL2 1-S1 and BL21 DE3 pLysS with the recombinant protein corresponding to the expected size -48 kDa. Both recombinant proteins have been confirmed with western blotting by using monoclonal anti-His antibod...
http://psasir.upm.edu.my/8486/
*  Recombinant Protein Production in Prokaryotic Systems | Wistar
Recombinant Protein Production in Prokaryotic Systems. Wistar. Postdoctoral Programs Predoctoral Programs High School Programs. Annual Biology Essay Contest Biomedical Research for High School Students Awards for Trainee Excellence Chemistry-Biology Interface Training Program Biomedical Technician Training Program Cancer Biology Graduate Program Support Wistar. Wistar Centers. Protein Expression Facility. Services Recombinant Protein Production in Prokaryotic Systems Our Science. Wistar Centers Research Areas Scientists Support and Infrastructure Centers Shared Resources Cores. Recombinant Plasmid DNA Engineering Recombinant Protein Production via BVES Recombinant Protein Production in Prokaryotic Systems Recombinant Protein Purification Retrovirus Production How to Obtain Services Helpful Information Instrumentation Policies and User Fees Contact Us Proteomics Facility Translational Research Management Facility Vector Core. Recombinant Protein Production in Prokaryotic Systems Recombinant Protein Production ...
http://wistar.org/our-science/shared-resources-cores/protein-expression-facility/services/recombinant-protein-produc-0
*  Niekonwencjonalne metody wykrywania Escherichia coli w wodzie do picia - Technologia Wody - Tom Nr 5
... 2012 - BazTech - Yadda. Szukaj. Przeglądaj. Pomoc. O bazie. . Narzędzia. Preferencje. Polski. English. Język Widoczny. Abstrakt 10 20 50 100. Liczba wyników. Artykuł - szczegóły. http://yadda.icm.edu.pl:80/baztech/element/bwmeta1.element.baztech-article-BPC2-0011-0006. Czasopismo Technologia Wody. Tytuł artykułu Niekonwencjonalne metody wykrywania Escherichia coli w wodzie do picia. Autorzy Trela, B. Papciak, D. Treść / Zawartość. Warianty tytułu EN Unconventional methods of detecting Escherichia coli in drinking water. Języki publikacji PL. Abstrakty PL W artykule przedstawiono sposoby wykrywania bakterii Escherichia coli w wodzie, oparte na konwencjonalnych i nowoczesnych metodach detekcji z zastosowaniem biosensor w. Zaprezentowano mechanizmy detekcji oraz techniki przetwarzania sygna u. Biosensory ze wzgl du na szybki pomiar s alternatyw dla konwencjo-nalnych metod opartych na izolowaniu i hodowaniu bakterii. Pozwalaj na szybkie reagowanie w przypadku stwierdzenia ska enia, chocia granica wykrywalno ...
http://yadda.icm.edu.pl/baztech/element/bwmeta1.element.baztech-article-BPC2-0011-0006
*  Common Drugs and Medications to Treat Appendicitis caused by Escherichia Coli Bacteria
... . Skip to content. Enter Search Keywords. Use the arrow keys to navigate suggestions. Symptoms. Doctors. Health Care Reform. Health A-Z. Common Conditions View All. ADD/ADHD. Allergies. Arthritis. Cancer. Cold, Flu Cough. Depression. Diabetes. Eye Health. Heart Disease. Heartburn/GERD. Pain Management. Sexual Conditions. Skin Problems. Sleep Disorders Featured Topics Identifying Bugs and Their Bites. Bothered by Yeast Infections. The Worst Shoes for Your Feet. WebMD Symptom Checker Health concern on your mind. See what your medical symptoms could mean, and learn about possible conditions. Get Started. Resources Second Opinion: Read expert perspectives on popular health topics. Communities: Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life. Insurance Guide: Get ready for changes to your health care coverage. Physician Directory: Find a doctor in your area. WebMD Pain Coach Track your pain levels, triggers, and treatments. Set goals and get tips with our app for iPhone. Drugs S...
http://webmd.com/drugs/condition-2068-Appendicitis caused by Escherichia Coli Bacteria.aspx?diseaseid=2068&diseasename=Appendicitis caused by Escherichia Coli Bacteria&source=3&sortColumn=4&sortDirection=a
*  Intel Wants to Put a Supercomputer in Your Pock...
You are the content you publish Get Started for FREE Sign up with Facebook. Sign up with Twitter I don't have a Facebook or a Twitter account Need content for your business. Scooped by ComplexInsight onto Complex Insight - Understanding our world. ComplexInsight's insight: IF you are involved in developing or using professional mapping, survey and photogrammetric products - Dielmo have released their back office cloud platform that enables teams to upload, store, process and share LiDAR, Raster, Vector data derived from UAV, Helicopter, Fixed-wing and Mobile platforms. ComplexInsight's insight: As evidence builds that fruit bats may be a vector for the recent ebola outbreak in Western Africa - I was reminded of this paper in CDC's EID journal which found 5 out of 276 3.5% tested bats in Bangladesh had antibodies to Ebola. ComplexInsight's insight: Discussion of limits is key to creating new ideas - Igor Markov's paper is worth reading for exploring lmitations and engineering implications and to trigger off ne...
http://scoop.it/t/complex-insight/p/3179502120/2012/11/02/intel-wants-to-put-a-supercomputer-in-your-pocket
*  Jeff Hawkins Develops a Brainy Big Data Company...
You are the content you publish Get Started for FREE Sign up with Facebook. Sign up with Twitter I don't have a Facebook or a Twitter account Need content for your business. Scooped by ComplexInsight onto Complex Insight - Understanding our world. ComplexInsight's insight: IF you are involved in developing or using professional mapping, survey and photogrammetric products - Dielmo have released their back office cloud platform that enables teams to upload, store, process and share LiDAR, Raster, Vector data derived from UAV, Helicopter, Fixed-wing and Mobile platforms. ComplexInsight's insight: As evidence builds that fruit bats may be a vector for the recent ebola outbreak in Western Africa - I was reminded of this paper in CDC's EID journal which found 5 out of 276 3.5% tested bats in Bangladesh had antibodies to Ebola. ComplexInsight's insight: Discussion of limits is key to creating new ideas - Igor Markov's paper is worth reading for exploring lmitations and engineering implications and to trigger off ne...
http://scoop.it/t/complex-insight/p/3566001896/2012/12/02/jeff-hawkins-develops-a-brainy-big-data-company
*  Interview with Brian Mathews, Group CTO @ Autod...
You are the content you publish Get Started for FREE Sign up with Facebook. Sign up with Twitter I don't have a Facebook or a Twitter account Need content for your business. Scooped by ComplexInsight onto Complex Insight - Understanding our world. ComplexInsight's insight: IF you are involved in developing or using professional mapping, survey and photogrammetric products - Dielmo have released their back office cloud platform that enables teams to upload, store, process and share LiDAR, Raster, Vector data derived from UAV, Helicopter, Fixed-wing and Mobile platforms. ComplexInsight's insight: As evidence builds that fruit bats may be a vector for the recent ebola outbreak in Western Africa - I was reminded of this paper in CDC's EID journal which found 5 out of 276 3.5% tested bats in Bangladesh had antibodies to Ebola. ComplexInsight's insight: Discussion of limits is key to creating new ideas - Igor Markov's paper is worth reading for exploring lmitations and engineering implications and to trigger off ne...
http://scoop.it/t/complex-insight/p/3567407948/2012/12/03/interview-with-brian-mathews-group-cto-autodesk
*  Big Data Myths…BUSTED. | Innovation | Co...
You are the content you publish Get Started for FREE Sign up with Facebook. Sign up with Twitter I don't have a Facebook or a Twitter account Need content for your business. Scooped by ComplexInsight onto Complex Insight - Understanding our world. ComplexInsight's insight: Open science is critically important to future development and increasingly under attack from a wired varied of scources - sadly including the government - worth reading. ComplexInsight's insight: As evidence builds that fruit bats may be a vector for the recent ebola outbreak in Western Africa - I was reminded of this paper in CDC's EID journal which found 5 out of 276 3.5% tested bats in Bangladesh had antibodies to Ebola. ComplexInsight's insight: Discussion of limits is key to creating new ideas - Igor Markov's paper is worth reading for exploring lmitations and engineering implications and to trigger off new discussions and ideas. ComplexInsight's insight: Knowing which machine learning method to apply for a given problem takes time to...
http://scoop.it/t/complex-insight/p/2008326571/2012/06/21/big-data-myths-busted-innovation
*  Interactive Physical Simulation | Complex Insig...
You are the content you publish Get Started for FREE Sign up with Facebook. Sign up with Twitter I don't have a Facebook or a Twitter account Need content for your business. Scooped by ComplexInsight onto Complex Insight - Understanding our world. If interactive physics or comptuer graphics is your thing then you need to read tje collected Research from Computer Graphics Group at University of Copenhagen. ComplexInsight's insight: As evidence builds that fruit bats may be a vector for the recent ebola outbreak in Western Africa - I was reminded of this paper in CDC's EID journal which found 5 out of 276 3.5% tested bats in Bangladesh had antibodies to Ebola. ComplexInsight's insight: Discussion of limits is key to creating new ideas - Igor Markov's paper is worth reading for exploring lmitations and engineering implications and to trigger off new discussions and ideas. ComplexInsight's insight: Knowing which machine learning method to apply for a given problem takes time to learn - fortunately the fine folks ...
http://scoop.it/t/complex-insight/p/2807456924/2012/09/27/interactive-physical-simulation
*  E. Coli Growth Curves
Coli Growth Curves. E Coli Growth Curves Paul N Hengen pnh at ncifcrf.gov. Previous message: Is ligation reaction volume only 10 ul. Coli Growth Curves Messages sorted by:. Joe Boutell boutell at cf.ac.uk wrote:. coli to see how expression of a variety of plasmids affects them; what's the best way. Can you spin down the cells and weigh them, or is taking an OD more accurate and at what wavelength. The OD will not tell you if the plasmid is stable in E. coli. For studying that you'll have to plate dilutions on selective media. But how about if you're growing the E. coli up in selective liquid media. media, and if most of the bugs are chucking out a particular plasmid. Joe Boutell. If you grow a population of bacteria in selective liquid media, a certain proportion of the cells will not carry the plasmid and they will not be resistant to the antibiotic, yet grow in liquid. You can prove this if you want, but my feeling is that growing up a culture in liquid and determining density is different from determining ...
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/methods/1997-June/058458.html
*  .. E Coli Bacteria: A Few Interesting Facts .. Related Articles: .. 9 Responses to “E Coli Bacter
Home » Health Conditions » Viral Infections » Other Viruses E Coli Bacteria: A Few Interesting Facts. E Coli Can Be Helpful or Harmful Depending on the Strain Hand Washing is the Number One Prevention Method for E. Coli Bacteria Since you can’t always make sure that people do their part in avoiding spreading infections, you can be sure to gird up your immune system to combat anything that comes your way. Check out products like Echinacea/Goldenseal w/Org. Alcohol, Ester C 500mg and Sambucus Immune Support/AF to give your immune system the boost it needs. What are the Main Causes of Viral Infections. Differences between Viral and Bacterial Infections. All You Need to Know about Viral Infections. 9 Responses to “E Coli Bacteria: A Few Interesting Facts”. coli is a fecal form of bacteria, and is mainly transmitted in fecal form or growing in the large intestine. coli are not harful but instead helpful, and like sarah said, it would be quite difficult for E. coli to survive in your drinking water unless it was a ...
http://nutralegacy.com/blog/general-healthcare/e-coli-bacteria-a-few-interesting-facts/
*  Identification of essential residues within Lit, a cell death peptidase of Escherichia coli K-12. -
... Lancaster EPrints. Lancaster EPrints. Identification of essential residues within Lit, a cell death peptidase of Escherichia coli K-12. Copeland, Nikki and Bingham, Ryan and Georgiou, Theonie and Cooper, Peter and Kleanthous, Colin 2004 Identification of essential residues within Lit, a cell death peptidase of Escherichia coli K-12. Bacteriophage exclusion is a suicide response to viral infection. In strains of Escherichia coli K-12 infected with T4 phage this process is mediated by the host-encoded Lit peptidase. Lit is activated by a unique sequence in the major head protein of the T4 phage the Gol sequence which then cleaves site-specifically the host translation factor EF-Tu, ultimately leading to cell death. Lit has very low sequence identity with other peptidases, with only a putative metallopeptidase motif, H 160 EXXH, giving an indication of its catalytic activity. The aim of the present study was to ascertain if Lit is a metallopeptidase, identify residues essential for Lit activity, and probe t...
http://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/52425/
*  Number of species of bacteria in mammalian la - bacteria - BNID 105655
... Home \ Search. Browse. Resources. Cell Biology by the Numbers. Login \ Submit. Popular BioNumbers. Recent BioNumbers. Key BioNumbers. Amazing BioNumbers. Find Terms. e.g., ribosome coli, p53 human, transcription, OD. BioNumber Details Page. Click search to return to the full list. ID 105655. Property Number of species of bacteria in mammalian large intestine. Organism bacteria. Range 400-500. Units unitless. Reference Peekhaus N, Conway T. What's for dinner?: Entner-Doudoroff metabolism in Escherichia coli. Reference PubMed ID 9657988. Primary Source Borrelio S P. Microbial flora of the gastro-intestinal tract. In: Hill M J, editor. Microbial metabolism in the digestive tract. Boca Raton, Fla: CRC Press, Inc. 1986. pp. 2–16. AND Finegold S M, Sutter V L, Mathisen G E. Normal indigenous intestinal microflora. In: Hentges D J, editor. Human intestinal microflora in health and disease. New York, N.Y: Academic Press, Inc. 1983. pp. 3–31.AND Hill M J. The normal gut bacterial flora. In: Hill M J, editor. Role...
http://bionumbers.hms.harvard.edu/bionumber.aspx?id=105655&ver=5
*  BL21(DE3) and trc promoter
bl de and trc promoter bl de and trc promoter chenha hzhen at freeuk com tue feb est previous message bl de and trc promoter next message bl de and trc promoter messages sorted by petri kursula wrote confused by all these e coli genotypes and strains i would like to know if anyone has used bl de cells to produce recombinant proteins from a vector with the trc promoter such as ptrc a if yes is this expression tightly regulatable by iptg or do you get leaky expression this is likely to be leaky i haven t used ptrc a for a long time but i think it has a laciq which should help with the regulation in general as long as the expression is reasonably well controlled it should be ok if your protein is not toxic to the cell you only need to worry about how tight the regulation is if your protein is toxic in which case ptrc a is a bad choice and you will have to consider using other vectors btw the de bit of your bl de is unncessary for ptrc a if you are confused by the strains all you need to know is that there are cl...
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/methods/2000-February/080939.html
*  .. Over 400 articles on the E. coli bacteria available online on SpringerLink .. Post navigation
coli bacteria available online on SpringerLink. Springer Science+Business Media is offering all journal articles and book chapters which deal with the E. coli bacteria free of charge on its online information platform www.springerlink.com. The articles can be found by using the search terms “Enterohaemorrhagic and Escherichia and coli” or by using the link www.springer.com/ehec. A total of over 400 scientific articles are available to print out or download from now until 1 September 2011. coli strain of bacterium has the potential to cause severe diarrhea, followed by serious organ system damage. During the past few weeks, a significant increase in the number of patients with the disease has been reported in Europe, especially in Germany. The European Center for Disease Prevention and Control says transmission of the strain of bacterium, commonly found in cattle, usually occurs through contaminated food or water and contact with animals. Eric Merkel-Sobotta, Executive Vice President Corporate Communicatio...
http://libsys.uah.edu/LibraryBlog/wordpress/?p=482
*  Site - glnVSite glnV
CGSC Coli Genetic Stock Center. E coli Genetic Resources at Yale CGSC, The Coli Genetic Stock Center. About the CGSC CGSC Home:. The Database Acknowledgment of Support Searching the CGSC Database Help With Query Forms Help with Genetic Nomenclature Strain Query Mutation Query Gene/Site Query Gene Product Query Reference Query Query Help How to Request Strains or Information Contact Information Charges How We Ship Strains Strains Not Found. Other CGSC Information FAQ on Procedures Current Working Map 1998 MMBR Map 1998 MMBR Gene List Map Diagrams PDFs Other Links E. coli Links Other Stock Collections Other Bio Links Yale Web. Site - glnV Site glnV Site glnV Name: glnV Type: Gene. Mnemonic: Glutamine Left End Point: 14.99 Right End Point: 15.00 Products: glutamine tRNA2. Direction: < Properties: Property Comment amber suppressor NULL. tRNA gene glutamine tRNA2. duplicate gene tandem;. glnV22 AS. glnV33 AS. glnV41 AS. glnV42 AS. glnV89 AS. glnV93 AS. External Database Links: Host Site Page Links EcoGene.org EG30...
http://cgsc.biology.yale.edu/Site.php?ID=695
*  Mutation - lpxL10(ts)::mini-Tn10Mutation lpxL10(ts)::mini-Tn10
cgsc coli genetic stock center e coli genetic resources at yale cgsc the coli genetic stock center pay an invoice about the cgsc cgsc home scope of the collection the database acknowledgment of support searching the cgsc database help with query forms help with genetic nomenclature strain query mutation query gene site query gene product query reference query query help how to request strains or information contact information charges how we ship strains strains not found other cgsc information faq on procedures current working map mmbr map mmbr gene list map diagrams pdfs other links e coli links other stock collections other bio links yale web funded by a grant from the national science foundation mutation lpxl ts mini tn mutation lpxl ts mini tn mutation lpxl ts mini tn name lpxl ts mini tn type tn mutation of gene lpxl approx map location properties property symbol temperature sensitive ts tetracycline resistant comments grows in rich media below c but not at higher temperatures references karow m s raina...
http://cgsc.biology.yale.edu/Mutation.php?ID=65138
*  OCA Atlas for 1SC4
... 1SC4 Hydrolase. date Feb 11, 2004. . title Crystal Structure Of The Human Caspase-1 C285a Mutant After Malonate authors M.J.Romanowski, J.M.Scheer, T.O'Brien, R.S.Mcdowell compound source. Molecule : Interleukin-1 Beta Convertase Chain : A Fragment : Interleukin-1 Beta Convertase P20 Synonym : Il-1bc, Il-1 Beta Converting Enzyme, Ice, Interleu Converting Enzyme, P45, Caspase-1, Casp-1; Ec : 3.4.22.36 Engineered : Yes Mutation : Yes Organism scientific : Homo Sapiens Organism common : Human Organism taxid : 9606 Gene : Casp1, Il1bc, Il1bce Expression system : Escherichia Coli Expression system taxid : 562 Expression system strain : Bl21 De3 Codon+ Expression system vector type : Plasmid Expression system plasmid : Prset. Molecule : Interleukin-1 Beta Convertase Chain : B Fragment : Interleukin-1 Beta Convertase P10 Synonym : Il-1bc, Il-1 Beta Converting Enzyme, Ice, Interleu Converting Enzyme, P45, Caspase-1, Casp-1; Ec : 3.4.22.36 Engineered : Yes Organism scientific : Homo Sapiens Organism common : Huma...
http://oca.weizmann.ac.il/oca-bin/ocashort?id=1SC4
*  OCA Atlas for 3L9J
... 3L9J Immune System. date Jan 05, 2010. . title Selection Of A Novel Highly Specific Tnfalpha Antagonist: In The Crystal Structure Of The Antagonist-Tnfalpha Complex authors P.Byla, M.H.Andersen, H.C.Thogersen, H.H.Gad, R.Hartmann compound source. Molecule : Tnfalpha Chain : C Engineered : Yes Organism scientific : Homo Sapiens Organism common : Human Organism taxid : 9606 Expression system : Escherichia Coli Expression system taxid : 562 Expression system vector type : Plasmid Expression system plasmid : Pt7ciih6. Molecule : Tumor Necrosis Factor, Soluble Form Chain : T Fragment : Unp Residues 85-233 Synonym : Tnf-Alpha, Tumor Necrosis Factor Ligand Superfamil 2, Tnf-A, Cachectin; Engineered : Yes Organism scientific : Homo Sapiens Organism common : Human Organism taxid : 9606 Expression system : Escherichia Coli Expression system taxid : 562 Expression system vector type : Plasmid Expression system plasmid : Pt7ciih6. symmetry. Space Group : P 63 2 2 R factor 0.173. R Free 0.217. crystal cell. length a ...
http://oca.weizmann.ac.il/oca-bin/ocashort?id=3L9J
*  .. E. coli found in Hazy Hill water supply
E coli found in Hazy Hill water supply. March 31, 2012 Williamson County Politics. TRAVIS COUNTY KXAN – Residents of the Hazy Hill community, a small residential area off State Highway 71 near Spicewood, learned E. coli was found in their water system two days after the test came back positive. Gulf Utility Service Inc., the Houston-based company responsible for supplying the water, sent a note to residents dated March 23. Most residents received the letter the following day and were using contaminated water without knowing it. E coli or Escherichia coli bacteria, according to the Mayo Clinic, normally live in the intestines of healthy people and animals. Most varieties of E. coli are harmless or cause relatively brief diarrhea. But a few particularly nasty strains, such as E. Healthy adults usually recover from infection with E. coli O157:H7 within a week, but young children and older adults can develop a life-threatening form of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome. The letter told residents a w...
http://txwclp.org/2012/03/e-coli-found-in-hazy-hill-water-supply/
*  dut- ung- E. coli strain request
dut ung e coli strain request dut ung e coli strain request the wagner lab ewlab at uci edu thu feb est previous message dut ung e coli strain request next message dut ung e coli strain request messages sorted by ottok at u washington edu kevin g otto wrote we are looking for a dut ung e coli strain named cj or any other transformable dut ung strain thanks kevin otto kevin i know this strain is available from biorad as part of their mutagene kit if you re too cheap to buy it ask some of your neighbors i m sure that someone has to have it as it is a fairly common strain matthew petroski mdpetros at uci edu molecular biology and biochemistry university of california irvine previous message dut ung e coli strain request next message dut ung e coli strain request messages sorted by more information about the methods mailing list...
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/methods/1996-February/041156.html
*  BISC209: Lab4 - OpenWetWare
room temperature BR. room temperature BR. Today you will insert your bacterial 16s rRNA gene fragments into a patented cloning vector pCR-BluntII TOPO® and then transform that vector into a special genetically engineered strain of Escherichia coli bacteria that will express a vector gene for kanamycin resistance, allowing us to select for transformants on media containing kanamycin. 4 Add 1 μL of pCR®II-Blunt-TOPO® cloning vector plasmid. Transforming One Shot® Competent Cells Introduction : Once you have performed the TOPO® Cloning reaction, you will transform your pCR®-Blunt II-TOPO® construct into TOPO10 competent E. Preparing for Transformation For each transformation, you will need one vial of competent cells and two selective plates. When medium size, ISOLATED colonies, have appeared, refrigerate your transformation plates until LAB 5. Make sure that these potentially pure cultures have colonies that look like the original source colony and that all of the colonies look the same they can be of different...
http://openwetware.org/index.php?title=BISC209:_Lab4&diff=424983&oldid=393895
*  SHuffle® Express Competent E. coli | NEB
SHuffle® Express Competent E. coli. NEB. My NEB. My NEB. SHuffle® Express Competent E. coli Products,. coli Expression Strains. E.coli Protein Expression,. FAQs Tech Tips. Other Tools Resources. Related Products. coli B cells engineered to form proteins containing disulfide bonds in the cytoplasm. Highlights Transformation efficiency: 1 x 10 7 cfu/µg pUC19 DNA Engineered E. coli cells. Is there anything I can do to increase protein yield when using SHuffle strains. Can I conduct blue/white screening using alpha complementation of lacZ in SHuffle strains. Datacards The Product Summary Sheet, or Data Card, includes details for how to use the product, as well as details of its formulation and quality controls. The following file naming structure is used to name the majority of these document files: Datasheet-Lot. For those product lots not listed below, please contact NEB at info@neb.com or fill out the Technical Support Form for appropriate document. Individual lot data can be found on the Product Summary Sheet...
https://neb.com/products/c3028-shuffle-express-competent-e-coli
*  .. Return to Strain Description
CGSC Strain#: 7145 Strain Designation: KJ173      Source of Strain: J.R. Beckwith Sex: F- Chromosomal Markers:. araA-leu 7697 , B/r , codB-lacI 3 , phoR82 , zaj-2085::Tn10 , secD29 Cs , galK16 , galE15 GalS , - , e14- , relA1 , rpsL150 strR , spoT1 , mcrB1 Strain Comments:. araA-leu 7697 -- Shown by Durfee et al. to be a deletion of the first 295 codons of hepA to the first 82 codons of fruR. araA-leu 7697 -- Gerdes et al. show this deletion to cover from 63.4 kb to 89 kb, from polB through fruR. B/r -- The thr-leu region was transduced from an E. coli B/r strain SB3118 in early steps of strain derivation; ara or in some strains ara-leu or thr-leu are from B. codB-lacI 3 -- is a deletion of the entire lac operon, from the strain Hfr 3000 X74 of Jacob. on extent of deletion: Sung et al.1987,J.Bact.169:2639; Gerdes et al.2001. codB-lacI 3 -- Shown by Durfee et al. to extend from codon 292 of yahG through mhpE. codB-lacI 3 -- Shown by Ferrandez et al. 1997 to extend to mhpD secD29 Cs -- : The secD lo...
http://cgsc.biology.yale.edu/StrainRpt.php?ID=38551
*  .. Return to Strain Description
CGSC Strain#: 7729 Strain Designation: ALS225      Source of Strain: E. Altman Sex: F' Episome/Plasmid: F128-xxx Plasmid Markers/Mutations: Chromosomal Markers:. araA-leu 7697, B/r, codB-lacI 3, galK16, galE15 GalS, -, e14-, mcrA0, relA1, rpsL150 strR, spoT1, mcrB9999, hsdR2 Strain Comments:. araA-leu 7697 -- Shown by Durfee et al. to be a deletion of the first 295 codons of hepA to the first 82 codons of fruR. araA-leu 7697 -- Gerdes et al. show this deletion to cover from 63.4 kb to 89 kb, from polB through fruR. B/r -- The thr-leu region was transduced from an E. coli B/r strain SB3118 in early steps of strain derivation; ara or in some strains ara-leu or thr-leu are from B. codB-lacI 3 -- is a deletion of the entire lac operon, from the strain Hfr 3000 X74 of Jacob. Refs. on extent of deletion: Sung et al.1987,J.Bact.169:2639; Gerdes et al.2001. codB-lacI 3 -- Shown by Ferrandez et al. 1997 to extend to mhpD. codB-lacI 3 -- Shown by Durfee et al. to extend from codon 292 of yahG through mhpE g...
http://cgsc.biology.yale.edu/StrainRpt.php?ID=76211
*  Protein toxity in E.coli
protein toxity in e coli protein toxity in e coli al r plummer aplummer at brain uccs edu fri jun est previous message inappropriate messages next message high copy trp library messages sorted by our lab is trying to overexpress and isolate a rather large yeast s cerevisiae protein in e coli the gene is ca kb and encodes a protein of a a we transformed dh alpha with a plasmid containing the gene but are unable to see it also when the expression is induced iptg the e coli become sick grow slower does anyone have any experience expressing large or toxic proteins in e coli any help would be greatly appreciated al plummer at em uni frankfurt de previous message inappropriate messages next message high copy trp library messages sorted by more information about the yeast mailing list...
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/yeast/1997-June/007099.html
*  E.Coli Westerns
e coli westerns e coli westerns dan szymanski dan szymanski at qms life uiuc edu wed nov est previous message gel database next message e coli westerns messages sorted by greetings netters a couple of us have been trying to detect recombinant e coli proteins with rabbit polyclonal ab backround is horrendous does anyone have an explanation or suggestions to reduce backround thanks dan previous message gel database next message e coli westerns messages sorted by more information about the proteins mailing list...
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/proteins/1994-November/001915.html
*  BMW M3 Forum (E90 E92) - View Single Post - New E93 goodness
bmw m forum e e view single post new e goodness thread new e goodness view single post pm sor lieutenant rep posts drives e m mw fr join date jun location ut itrader no since they re mineral white they catch the light differently at different angles i imagine you re referring to the fourth photo see the first photo quote sor view public profile find more posts by sor...
http://m3post.com/forums/showpost.php?p=8340400&postcount=25
*  Need help:insoluble to soluble
need help insoluble to soluble need help insoluble to soluble jared quentin lemaster lemaster at osu edu mon oct est previous message announce vmd beta next message need help insoluble to soluble messages sorted by hi i expressed foreign protein in e coli to the level of about total protein after iptg induction but it is insoluble does anyone have any experiences that could make it soluble without loss of function or expressed as a soluble protein in e coli pls send your suggestion to wang at osu edu thanks a lot previous message announce vmd beta next message need help insoluble to soluble messages sorted by more information about the proteins mailing list...
http://bio.net/bionet/mm/proteins/1999-October/007531.html
*  2015/16 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code A04.1 : Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection
... Toggle navigation. . ICD-10-CM Codes. ICD-10-CM Indexes. Conversion. Coding Rules. ICD-10-PCS Codes. Disclaimer. About. Home > 2015/16 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Codes > Certain infectious and parasitic diseases A00-B99 > Intestinal infectious diseases A00-A09 > Other bacterial intestinal infections A04- 2015/16 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code A04.1. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection 2015 2016 Billable Code A04.1 is a billable ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of A04.1. Other international ICD-10 versions may differ. Description Synonyms E coli enterotoxigenic enteritis Escherichia coli enterotoxigenic enteritis ICD-10-CM A04.1 is grouped within Diagnostic Related Group s MS-DRG v30.0 : 371 Major gastrointestinal disorders and peritoneal infections with mcc 372 Major gastrointestinal disorders and peritoneal infecti...
http://icd10data.com/ICD10CM/Codes/A00-B99/A00-A09/A04-/A04.1
*  KEGG PATHWAY: Pathogenic Escherichia coli infection - Homo sapiens (human)
kegg pathway pathogenic escherichia coli infection homo sapiens human pathogenic escherichia coli infection homo sapiens human pathway menu organism menu pathway entry download kgml show description user data mapping enteropathogenic e coli epec and enterohemorrhagic e coli ehec are closely related pathogenic strains of escherichia coli the hallmark of epec ehec infections is induction of attaching and effacing a e lesions that damage intestinal epithelial cells the capacity to form a e lesions is encoded mainly by the locus of enterocyte effacement lee pathogenicity island tir map espf espg are known lee encoded effector proteins secreted via the type iii secretion system which is also lee encoded into the host cell epec and ehec tir s link the extracellular bacterium to the cell cytoskeleton map and espf are involved in mitochondrion membrane permeabilization espg interacts with tubulins and stimulates microtubule destabilization lee encoded adhesin or intimin eae is exported via the general secretory pathw...
http://genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?hsa05130 M00542
*  KEGG PATHWAY: Pathogenic Escherichia coli infection
kegg pathway pathogenic escherichia coli infection pathogenic escherichia coli infection pathway menu organism menu pathway entry download kgml show description user data mapping enteropathogenic e coli epec and enterohemorrhagic e coli ehec are closely related pathogenic strains of escherichia coli the hallmark of epec ehec infections is induction of attaching and effacing a e lesions that damage intestinal epithelial cells the capacity to form a e lesions is encoded mainly by the locus of enterocyte effacement lee pathogenicity island tir map espf espg are known lee encoded effector proteins secreted via the type iii secretion system which is also lee encoded into the host cell epec and ehec tir s link the extracellular bacterium to the cell cytoskeleton map and espf are involved in mitochondrion membrane permeabilization espg interacts with tubulins and stimulates microtubule destabilization lee encoded adhesin or intimin eae is exported via the general secretory pathway to the periplasm where it is insert...
http://genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?ko05130 K05703
*  KEGG PATHWAY: Pathogenic Escherichia coli infection + T20074
... Pathogenic Escherichia coli infection + T20074. [ Pathway menu Organism menu Pathway entry. Download KGML Show description User data mapping ]. Enteropathogenic E. coli EPEC and enterohemorrhagic E. coli EHEC are closely related pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. The hallmark of EPEC/EHEC infections is induction of attaching and effacing A/E lesions that damage intestinal epithelial cells. The capacity to form A/E lesions is encoded mainly by the locus of enterocyte effacement LEE pathogenicity island. Tir, Map, EspF, EspG are known LEE-encoded effector proteins secreted via the type III secretion system, which is also LEE-encoded, into the host cell. EPEC and EHEC Tir's link the extracellular bacterium to the cell cytoskeleton. Map and EspF are involved in mitochondrion membrane permeabilization. EspG interacts with tubulins and stimulates microtubule destabilization. LEE-encoded adhesin or intimin Eae is exported via the general secretory pathway to the periplasm, where it is inserted into the out...
http://genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?T20074_05130
*  WHO | Escherichia coli infections
WHO. Escherichia coli infections. Skip to main content. Access. Home Alt+0. Navigation Alt+1. Content Alt+2. Search. Search the WHO .int site. Submit. Advanced search. Navigation. Home. Health topics. Data. Media centre. Publications. Countries. Programmes. Governance. About WHO. Language. عربي. 中文. English. Français. Русский. Español. RSS Feed. Youtube. Twitter. Facebook. Google +. iTunes. Play Store. Health topics. Escherichia coli infections. Escherichia coli is a bacterium that is commonly found in the gut of humans and other warm-blooded animals. While most strains are harmless, some can cause severe foodborne disease. E coli infection is usually transmitted through consumption of contaminated water or food, such as undercooked meat products and raw milk. Symptoms of disease include abdominal cramps and diarrhoea, which may be bloody. Fever and vomiting may also occur. Most patients recover within 10 days, although in a few cases the disease may become life-threatening. World Health Day 2015: food safety...
http://who.int/topics/escherichia_coli_infections/en/
*  Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli
... 'Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli' often referred to as EAEC is a pathotype of Escherichia coli often associated with diarrhoeal illness. The defining characteristic of EAEC compared to other pathotypes of 'E. coli' is a "stacked brick" pattern of adhesion to the human epithelial cell line HEp-2. The pathogenesis of EAEC involves the bacteria aggregating and colonizing the intestinal mucosa, releasing enterotoxin s and cytotoxin s that damage host cells and inducing inflammation - resulting in diarrhoea and other gastrointestinal symptoms. EAEC is being increasingly recognised as an emerging enteric pathogen. In particular, EAEC is a common bacterial cause of paediatric diarrhoea, especially in developing countries. "A review of an emerging enteric pathogen: enteroaggregative Escherichia coli." Journal of Medical Microbiology 55 10 : 1303-1311. The pathogen responsible was found to be an EAEC O104:H4 strain which had acquired a Shiga toxin usually associated with Verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli. N...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enteroaggregative_Escherichia_coli
*  Escherichia coli Infection | Allegiance Health | Jackson, Michigan (MI)
Escherichia coli Infection. Allegiance Health. Main Menu Home Patient Guide Services Locations Careers About Us My Health Contact. Allegiance Health Menu. My Health. Search form. My Health /. Diseases Conditions / Escherichia coli Infection. Diseases Conditions. Disease Condition Information Centers. Wellness Centers. Latest Health News. Browse Diseases & Conditions a. Escherichia coli Infection. Risk Factors. Symptoms. Prevention Definition Escherichia coli E. coli infection is caused by a bacteria. Causes This infection is caused by some types of the E. coli infections are caused by: Eating undercooked beef, especially ground beef Drinking contaminated water Drinking unpasteurized milk Working with cattle. coli infection include: People with another illness Working with cattle Living in northern states Symptoms Symptoms of E. coli infection include: Abdominal cramps Watery diarrhea. coli infection. coli infection: Cook all ground beef and hamburger thoroughly. Resources Centers for Disease Control and Preve...
http://allegiancehealth.org/wellness/article/191491
*  A TIME'S MEMORY: Comparable High Rates of Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia col
... i in Birds of Prey from Germany and Mongolia PLoS ONE, abstract, edited. A TIME'S MEMORY. Flu, Bugs and other Accidents. BOA1. 1 Jan 2013. Comparable High Rates of Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Birds of Prey from Germany and Mongolia PLoS ONE, abstract, edited. Research Article Comparable High Rates of Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in Birds of Prey from Germany and Mongolia Sebastian Guenther, Katja Aschenbrenner, Ivonne Stamm, Astrid Bethe, Torsten Semmler, Annegret Stubbe, Michael Stubbe, Nyamsuren Batsajkhan, Youri Glupczynski, Lothar H. Wieler, Christa Ewers Affiliations:. Abstract Frequent contact with human waste and liquid manure from intensive livestock breeding, and the increased loads of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that result, are believed to be responsible for the high carriage rates of ESBL-producing E. coli found in birds of prey raptors in Central Europe. To test this hypothesis against the influence of avian migration, we ini...
http://hygimia69.blogspot.com/2013/01/comparable-high-rates-of-extended.html
*  "Association of putative enteroaggregative Escherichia coli virulence g" by Jamal A Mohamed, David
... B Huang et al. Home. Search. Browse Collections. My Account. About. Digital Commons Network™. Skip to main content. DigitalCommons@The Texas Medical Center. Home. About. FAQ. My Account. Previous. Next. Home. UT Health. UTHMED. UTHMED DOCS. 164. UT Medical School Journal Articles. Title. Association of putative enteroaggregative Escherichia coli virulence genes and biofilm production in isolates from travelers to developing countries. Authors. Jamal A Mohamed David B Huang Zhi-Dong Jiang Herbert L DuPont James P Nataro Jaime Belkind-Gerson Pablo C Okhuysen. Publication Date. 1-1-2007. Journal. J Clin Microbiol. 2007 January; 45 1 : 121–126. Abstract. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli EAEC is an emerging enteric pathogen that causes acute and chronic diarrhea among children, human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and travelers to developing regions of the world. The pathogenesis of EAEC strains involves the production of biofilm. In this study, we determined the association between presence of p...
http://digitalcommons.library.tmc.edu/uthmed_docs/164/
*  Escherichia coli Infection - Danville Regional Medical Center | Danville, VA
Escherichia coli Infection - Danville Regional Medical Center. Danville, VA. Danville Regional Medical Center. Careers. Contact Us. Directions. Find a Physician. Services. Services Heart Center. Surgical Services. Medical Specialties. Rehabilitation Services. Women’s Services. More Services. Danville Regional provides over 25 medical specialties and 14 surgical services to the community. Resources. Resources For Patients. Maps & Directions. Volunteer Services. Classes & Events. Health Insurance Marketplaces. Whether you are a patient or visitor at Danville Regional Medical Center, we want your experience with us to be as pleasant as possible. Health Information. Health Information Health Library. Infection Prevention Information. Virtual Body. Health Information Videos. Health eCooking. Recent Health News. Regional Report Card. Health Talk: Showcase Magazine. An extensive library of Health Information is right here at your fingertips. For Professionals Career Center. For Physicians. Learn more about the oppor...
http://danvilleregional.com/your-health/?/191491/
*  Oligosaccharide-mediated inhibition of the adhesion of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains to human
... gut epithelial cells in vitro - CentAUR. University of Reading. CentAUR: Central Archive at the University of Reading. Accessibility navigation. Oligosaccharide-mediated inhibition of the adhesion of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains to human gut epithelial cells in vitro. Tools. Tools. Tools. Wordle Link RDF+XML BibTeX RIOXX2 XML RDF+N-Triples JSON Dublin Core Atom Simple Metadata Refer METS HTML Citation with IDs HTML Citation ASCII Citation OpenURL ContextObject EndNote OpenURL ContextObject in Span MODS MPEG-21 DIDL EP3 XML Dublin Core Reference Manager RDF+N3. A 2008 Oligosaccharide-mediated inhibition of the adhesion of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains to human gut epithelial cells in vitro. The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of pectic oligosaccharides POS to inhibit adhesion of three strains of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli, three strains of enteropathogenic E. coli, and one nonclinical strain of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans to human intestinal epithelial cell cultures. Lacto...
http://centaur.reading.ac.uk/13049/
*  E. Coli Infection From Food or Water: Blood and Kidney Problems - Mary Greeley Medical Center
Coli Infection From Food or Water: Blood and Kidney Problems - Mary Greeley Medical Center. Health Wellness. About Mary Greeley. Maps Directions. Health Wellness. Health Library. E Coli Infection From Food or Water: Blood and Kidney Problems. Health Library E. Coli Infection From Food or Water: Blood and Kidney Problems. Topic Overview. References. Coli Infection From Food or Water: Blood and Kidney Problems Skip to the navigation Topic Overview Severe problems affecting the blood and kidneys may develop in a small number of people 5% to 10% infected with E. footnote 1 These problems include anemia, a low number of platelets in the blood, the formation of small blood clots, and kidney renal failure. Symptoms Symptoms of hemolytic uremic syndrome or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura may include: Pale skin caused by anemia. Nervous system problems. coli infection should be monitored carefully for these problems. They should have blood and urine tests rather than waiting for symptoms to develop. Risk factors T...
https://mgmc.org/wellness/health-library/healthwise-document-viewer/?id=hw194079
*  Joanne L Platell
... add/edit. You are here: Scientific Experts Australia. University of Queensland Platell Joanne L Platell. Research Topics fluoroquinolones escherichia coli infections bacterial typing techniques virulence escherichia coli microbial sensitivity tests dogs cats genotype intestinal diseases virulence factors domestic animals clone cells dna fingerprinting meat phylogeny molecular epidemiology bacterial drug resistance escherichia coli proteins cluster analysis alleles bacterial dna dog diseases anti bacterial agents polymerase chain reaction carrier state random amplified polymorphic dna technique prevalence urinary tract infections bacterial infections. Joanne L Platell Summary Affiliation: University of Queensland Country: Australia. Publications Commonality among fluoroquinolone-resistant sequence type ST131 extraintestinal Escherichia coli isolates from humans and companion animals in Australia Joanne L Platell School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, Queensland, Australia Anti...
http://labome.org/expert/australia/university/platell/joanne-l-platell-1638475.html
*  Treating Intestinal E. coli Infection With Antibiotic May Reduce Duration of Bacterial Carriage
... About Microbiology. All Content News Video Images Resources My Collections Submissions Tags. Click for more " Microbes After Hours " videos. Join MicrobeWorld. Treating Intestinal E. coli Infection With Antibiotic May Reduce Duration of Bacterial Carriage. Treating Intestinal E. coli Infection With Antibiotic May Reduce Duration of Bacterial Carriage. azithromycin, bacterial carriage, E. coli, Escherichia coli, Germany, intestine, JAMA, outbreak, shiga toxin. In the E coli outbreak in Germany in May 2011, treatment with azithromycin was associated with a lower frequency of long-term carriage of the bacteria and shorter duration of shedding of the bacteria in stool specimens, according to a study in the March 14 issue of JAMA. "Since May 2011, a large outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli STEC has caused 3,816 documented infections in Germany, including 845 confirmed cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome," the authors write. how to get viagra samples free Kamagra Gel allows the dude to handle hi...
http://microbeworld.org/index.php?option=com_jlibrary&view=article&id=8474
*  E. coli Infection in Children - Fairview Health Services
E coli Infection in Children - Fairview Health Services. Hospital Quick Search:. Hospitals Medical Centers: Fairview Lakes Medical Center. Fairview Northland Medical Center. University of Minnesota Masonic Children s Hospital. University of Minnesota Medical Center. University of Minnesota Health Maple Grove Clinics. Doctors Providers Quick Search:. Services Quick Search:. Cancer care. Fairview Clinics. Health Library Quick Search:. Contact us: Contact Fairview. Urgent Care. Health Library. E coli Infection in Children E coli is a common bacteria found inside of people and animals' intestines. it is also found in the environment and in food. But certain strains of E coli are harmful and can cause severe illness in people. You or your child can be infected by swallowing food or water that contain the bacteria. Contamination occurs when food or water comes in contact with stool from infected humans and animals. Events that have live animals near food stalls for people can put children at risk for E coli infecti...
http://fairview.org/HealthLibrary/Article/88619
*  Hiran Dhanji
... add/edit. You are here: Scientific Experts UK. Health Protection Agency Dhanji Hiran Dhanji. Research Topics cephalosporin resistance escherichia coli escherichia coli infections fluoroquinolones molecular epidemiology microbial sensitivity tests plasmids bacterial typing techniques polymerase chain reaction feces escherichia coli proteins cefuroxime phylogeny ciprofloxacin travel rivers nursing homes meat diarrhea electroporation chickens gene transfer techniques culture media genetic vectors cephalosporins reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction porins clavulanic acid isoelectric focusing enzyme inhibitors. Genomes and Genes TEM-1. products. oxa1. Species Escherichia coli. Hiran Dhanji Summary Affiliation: Health Protection Agency Country: UK. Publications Dissemination of pCT-like IncK plasmids harboring CTX-M-14 extended-spectrum β-lactamase among clinical Escherichia coli isolates in the United Kingdom Hiran Dhanji Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring and Reference Laboratory, Health Protection ...
http://labome.org/expert/uk/health/dhanji/hiran-dhanji-1597041.html
*  E. coli colonization trigger identified
... . Published on dvm360.com Home > E. coli colonization trigger identified E. coli colonization trigger identified Microbiologists identify and deactivate trigger to EHEC colonization in grain-fed cattle. May 22, 2010. By dvm360.com staff DVM360 MAGAZINE. Dallas -- Microbiologists at the University of Texas UT Southwestern Medical Center, working with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have discovered at least two ways to prevent outbreaks of food-borne illnesses caused by the Escherichia coli strain enterohemorrhagic 0157:H7, or EHEC, in grain-fed cattle. By either eliminating or mutating the protein SdiA found in EHEC, researchers were able to stop the bacteria from reaching its colonization site -- the cow's recto-anal junction. As 70 percent to 80 percent of cattle herds in the United States carry EHEC, and EHEC is responsible for outbreaks worldwide resulting in diarrhea to death, these findings are encouraging, according to researchers. Dr. Vanessa Sperandio, associate professor of microbiology and ...
http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/print/297947?page=full
*  E. coli Infection | Diagnosis & Tests
e coli infection diagnosis tests menu return to web version e coli infection diagnosis tests how is e coli infection diagnosed the diagnosis is made by finding e coli in a stool culture if you have bloody diarrhea see your doctor as soon as possible your doctor will do a culture to find out if you have e coli in your intestines the culture has to be taken in the first hours after the bloody diarrhea starts written by familydoctor org editorial staff reviewed updated created...
http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/ecoli-infection/diagnosis-tests.printerview.html
*  Cases of E coli infection climb to 27 | MEAT+POULTRY
cases of e coli infection climb to meat poultry cases of e coli infection climb to cdc two people diagnosed with a type of kidney failure meatpoultry com by meat poultry staff atlanta the centers for disease control atlanta reported that people have been infected with the outbreak strain of e coli o in states no deaths have been reported but two people have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome a type of kidney failure current information from interviews of ill persons indicates that consumption of farm rich brand frozen food products is one likely source of infection in this outbreak cdc said the outbreak strain of e coli o was identified in two different farm rich brand frozen products collected from the homes of two ill persons the outbreaks section of usda s food safety and inspection service eastern laboratory identified the outbreak strain from individually wrapped farm rich brand frozen mini pizza slices from an opened package collected from an ill person s home in texas cdc said also the new york state ...
http://meatpoultry.com/articles/news_home/Food_Safety/2013/04/Cases_of_E_coli_infection_clim.aspx?ID={88FD423D-7FDC-4528-9A8A-988A3DA1D931}&p=1
*  Carbohydrate utilization by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in bovine intestinal content
... - Bertin - 2012 - Environmental Microbiology - Wiley Online Library. Chief Editor's Choice Articles Volume 12. Chief Editor's Choice Articles Volume 13. Chief Editor's Choice Articles Volume 14. Chief Editor's Choice Articles Volume 15. Research article Carbohydrate utilization by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in bovine intestinal content. Yolande Bertin 1,*, Fr d rique Chaucheyras-Durand 2, Catherine Robbe-Masselot 3, Alexandra Durand 1, Anne de la Foye 4, Jos e Harel 5, Paul S. Cohen 6, Tyrell Conway 7, Evelyne Forano 1 and Christine Martin 1 Article first published online: 6 NOV 2012 DOI: 10.1111/1462-2920.12019 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. Additional Information How to Cite Bertin, Y., Chaucheyras-Durand, F., Robbe-Masselot, C., Durand, A., de la Foye, A., Harel, J., Cohen, P. 2013, Carbohydrate utilization by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in bovine intestinal content. Publication History Issue published online: 28 JAN 2013 Article fi...
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1462-2920.12019/abstract
*  Escherichia coli O157:H7 Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments and Causes - RightDiagnosis.com
HOME SYMPTOMS DISEASES DIAGNOSIS VIDEOS TOOLS COMMUNITY MISDIAGNOSIS DOCTORS HOSPITALS DRUGS. Diagnosis Diagnosis for Escherichia coli O157:H7 Diagnostic Tests for Escherichia coli O157:H7 Home Diagnostic Testing for Escherichia coli O157:H7. Misdiagnosis Misdiagnosis of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Doctors and Medical Specialists for Escherichia coli O157:H7. Statistics Statistics about Escherichia coli O157:H7. Intro Symptoms Causes Tests Prognosis Treatment Prevention Misdiagnosis Deaths. Escherichia coli O157:H7: Escherichia coli O157:H7: Introduction Symptoms Causes Treatments Misdiagnosis Home Testing Deaths Complications Prognosis Research Statistics Stories from Users Full Contents list. Home medical testing related to Escherichia coli O157:H7:. coli Urinary track infection Positive throat culture for E Coli E-coli Infection-UTI-Acute Back Pain 3 Months Now melanosis coli E Coli e coli infection in throat eww why?!. Coli UTI/scrotum infection Escherichia coli O157:H7: Deaths. Misdiagnosis and Escherichia...
http://rightdiagnosis.com/e/escherichia_coli_o157_h7/intro.htm
*  Enhancement of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 stress tolerance via pre-heating.
... Document Detail. Enhancement of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 stress tolerance via pre-heating. MedLine Citation:. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection causes several hundred cases of food poisoning every year in Japan. In severe cases, this type of food poisoning can be fatal. In the present study, we examined the induction of HSP70 in E. coli O157:H7 cells at various temperatures and the thermotolerance of E. coli O157:H7 cells alone and in contaminated food following pre-heating. coli O157:H7 increases the likelihood of food poisoning. E coli O157:H7 cells were heated at 43-51 °C, and the survival rate was examined. The temperature of highest induction of HSP70 was used as the pre-heating temperature. coli O157:H7 cells following pre-heating as the survival after heating at 53 °C lethal temperature. Additionally, we evaluated the thermotolerance of E. coli O157:H7 cells in ground beef following pre-heating. Heating at 47 °C for 30 min caused the highest induction of HSP70 ...
http://biomedsearch.com/nih/Enhancement-enterohemorrhagic-O157H7-stress-tolerance/22159372.html
*  Escherichia coli O104:H21
escherichia coli o h escherichia coli o h escherichia coli o h is a rare serotype of escherichia coli a species of bacteria that lives in the lower intestines of mammals http www cdc gov mmwr preview mmwrhtml mm a htm laboratory confirmed non o shiga toxin producing e coli centers for disease control and prevention accessed march the presence of many serotypes of e coli in animals is beneficial or does not cause disease in animals however some serotypes of e coli have been recognized as pathogenic to humans e g e coli o h e coli o and e coli o h history effects treatment see also references history e coli o h was discovered in when it caused an outbreak of severe bloody diarrhea it had infected hamburgers and those affected had eaten these hamburgers not fully cooked http www cdc gov ncidod dbmd diseaseinfo escherichiacoli g htm what is escherichia coli o h centers for disease control and prevention last accessed august an outbreak of e coli responsible for at least deaths in northern europe in may was report...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escherichia_coli_O104:H21
*  KEGG PATHWAY: Peptidoglycan biosynthesis - Yersinia pestis Z176003
Peptidoglycan biosynthesis - Yersinia pestis Z176003 [ Pathway menu | Organism menu | Pathway entry | Download KGML | Show description | User data mapping ] Peptidoglycan is a macromolecule made of long aminosugar strands cross-linked by short peptides. It forms the cell wall in bacteria surrounding the cytoplasmic membrane. The glycan strands are typically comprised of repeating N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc) disaccharides. Each MurNAc is linked to a peptide of three to five amino acid residues. Disaccharide subunits are first assembled on the cytoplasmic side of the bacterial membrane on a polyisoprenoid anchor (lipid I and II). Polymerization of disaccharide subunits by transglycosylases and cross-linking of glycan strands by transpeptidases occur on the other side of the membrane. Bacterial cell wall biosynthesis inhibitors form a major class of antibiotics. Reference pathway Reference pathway (KO) Reference pathway (EC) Reference pathway (Reaction) -----< Set personaliz...
http://genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?ypz00550 YPZ3_0535

Escherichia coli (molecular biology): Escherichia coli (; commonly abbreviated E. coli) is a gammaproteobacterium commonly found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms (endotherms).List of strains of Escherichia coli: Escherichia coli is a well studied bacterium that was first identified by Theodor Escherich, after whom it was later named.Escherichia coli O121: Escherichia coli O121 is a serotype of Escherichia coli, a species of bacteria that lives in the lower intestines of mammals.http://www.Ferric uptake regulator family: In molecular biology, the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) family of proteins includes metal ion uptake regulator proteins. These are responsible for controlling the intracellular concentration of iron in many bacteria.Coles PhillipsSymmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.Triparental mating: Triparental mating is a form of Bacterial conjugation where a conjugative plasmid present in one bacterial strain assists the transfer of a mobilizable plasmid present in a second bacterial strain into a third bacterial strain. Plasmids are introduced into bacteria for such purposes as transformation, cloning, or transposon mutagenesis.Protein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Ligation-independent cloning: Ligation-independent cloning (LIC) is a form of molecular cloning that is able to be performed without the use of restriction endonucleases or DNA ligase. This allows genes that have restriction sites to be cloned without worry of chopping up the insert.Silent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.Saf pilin N-terminal extension: In molecular biology, the protein domain, Saf pilin N-terminal extension refers to a domain only found in bacteria, more specifically, in gram-negative bacteria. Pili need to be formed by bacteria, as they are a method of adhering to the host organism which helps them infect the host cell.Operon: In genetics, an operon is a functioning unit of genomic DNA containing a cluster of genes under the control of a single promoter. The genes are transcribed together into an mRNA strand and either translated together in the cytoplasm, or undergo trans-splicing to create monocistronic mRNAs that are translated separately, i.Burst kinetics: Burst kinetics is a form of enzyme kinetics that refers to an initial high velocity of enzymatic turnover when adding enzyme to substrate. This initial period of high velocity product formation is referred to as the "Burst Phase".Circular bacterial chromosome: A circular bacterial chromosome is a bacterial chromosome in the form of a molecule of circular DNA. Unlike the linear DNA of most eukaryotes, typical bacterial chromosomes are circular.Transfer-messenger RNA: Transfer-messenger RNA (abbreviated tmRNA, also known as 10Sa RNA and by its genetic name SsrA) is a bacterial RNA molecule with dual tRNA-like and messenger RNA-like properties. The tmRNA forms a ribonucleoprotein complex (tmRNP) together with Small Protein B (SmpB), Elongation Factor Tu (EF-Tu), and ribosomal protein S1.Bacterial outer membraneEnterobacteria phage G4: Enterobacteria phage G4 is a bacteriophage capable of infecting susceptible bacterial cells. The phage was originally isolated from samples of raw sewage and infects E.DNA binding site: DNA binding sites are a type of binding site found in DNA where other molecules may bind. DNA binding sites are distinct from other binding sites in that (1) they are part of a DNA sequence (e.BacitracinEagle's minimal essential medium: Eagle's minimal essential medium (EMEM) is a cell culture medium developed by Harry Eagle that can be used to maintain cells in tissue culture.Permissive temperature: The permissive temperature is the temperature at which a temperature sensitive mutant gene product takes on a normal, functional phenotype.http://www.Tir (receptor): Tir (translocated intimin receptor) is an essential component in the adherence of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorraghic Escherichia coli to the cells lining the small intestine. To aid attachment, both EPEC and EHEC possess the ability to reorganise the host cell actin cytoskeleton via the secretion of virulence factors.AB toxin: The AB toxins are two-component protein complexes secreted by a number of pathogenic bacteria. They can be classified as Type III toxins because they interfere with internal cell function.Specificity constant: In the field of biochemistry, the specificity constant (also called kinetic efficiency or k_{cat}/K_{M}), is a measure of how efficiently an enzyme converts substrates into products. A comparison of specificity constants can also be used as a measure of the preference of an enzyme for different substrates (i.Pilin: Pilin refers to a class of fibrous proteins that are found in pilus structures in bacteria. Bacterial pili are used in the exchange of genetic material during bacterial conjugation, while a shorter type of appendages also made up of pilin, called fimbriae, are used as a cell adhesion mechanism.Gentamicin protection assay: The gentamicin protection assay or survival assay or invasion assay is a method used in microbiology. It is used to quantify the ability of pathogenic bacteria to invade eukaryotic cells.Margaret Jope: Margaret Jope (1913–2004) was a Scottish biochemist, born as Henrietta Margaret Halliday in Peterhead, Scotland.Escherichia fergusonii: Escherichia fergusonii is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped species of bacterium. Closely related to the well-known species Escherichia coli, E.Eukaryotic transcription: Eukaryotic transcription is the elaborate process that eukaryotic cells use to copy genetic information stored in DNA into units of RNA replica. Gene transcription occurs in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.Enterohemorrhagic: Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strain (EHEC) is the most common E. coli strain producing disease in U.Molar mass distribution: In linear polymers the individual polymer chains rarely have exactly the same degree of polymerization and molar mass, and there is always a distribution around an average value. The molar mass distribution (or molecular weight distribution) in a polymer describes the relationship between the number of moles of each polymer species (Ni) and the molar mass (Mi) of that species.Database of protein conformational diversity: The Database of protein conformational diversity (PCDB) is a database of diversity of protein tertiary structures within protein domains as determined by X-ray crystallography. Proteins are inherently flexible and this database collects information on this subject for use in molecular research.Senescence-associated beta-galactosidase: Senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-gal or SABG) is a hypothetical hydrolase enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-galactosides into monosaccharides only in senescent cells.Chromosome regionsReaction coordinateCongenital chloride diarrhea: Congenital chloride diarrhea (CCD, also congenital chloridorrhea or Darrow Gamble syndrome) is a genetic disorder due to an autosomal recessive mutation on chromosome 7. The mutation is in downregulated-in-adenoma (DRA), a gene that encodes a membrane protein of intestinal cells.Antitermination: Antitermination is the prokaryotic cell's aid to fix premature termination of RNA synthesis during the transcription of RNA. It occurs when the RNA polymerase ignores the termination signal, and it provides a mechanism whereby one or more genes at the end of an operon can be switched either on or off, depending on the polymerase either recognizing or not recognizing the termination signal.Chloramphenicol acetyltransferaseHeat-labile enterotoxin family: In molecular biology, the heat-labile enterotoxin family includes Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin and cholera toxin secreted by Vibrio cholerae. These toxins consist of an AB5 multimer structure, in which a pentamer of B chains has a membrane-binding function and an A chain is needed for enzymatic activity.Proximity ligation assay: Proximity ligation assay (in situ PLA) is a technology that extends the capabilities of traditional immunoassays to include direct detection of proteins, protein interactions and modifications with high specificity and sensitivity. Protein targets can be readily detected and localized with single molecule resolution and objectively quantified in unmodified cells and tissues.Core enzyme: A core enzyme consists of the subunits of an enzyme that are needed for catalytic activity, as in the core enzyme RNA polymerase.Genetics: Analysis & Principles, 3rd Edition.Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter: Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters (TRAP transporters) are a large family of solute transporters found in bacteria and archaea, but not in eukaryotes, that appear to be specific for the uptake of organic acids. They are unique in that they utilize a substrate binding protein (SBP) in combination with a secondary transporter.DNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).Alkaliphile: Alkaliphiles are a class of extremophilic microbes capable of survival in alkaline (pH roughly 8.5-11) environments, growing optimally around a pH of 10.CS-BLASTColicin: A colicin is a type of bacteriocin produced by and toxic to some strains of Escherichia coli.* Feldgarden, M.Restriction fragment: A restriction fragment is a DNA fragment resulting from the cutting of a DNA strand by a restriction enzyme (restriction endonucleases), a process called restriction. Each restriction enzyme is highly specific, recognising a particular short DNA sequence, or restriction site, and cutting both DNA strands at specific points within this site.Composite transposon: A composite transposon is similar in function to simple transposons and Insertion Sequence (IS) elements in that it has protein coding DNA segments flanked by inverted, repeated sequences that can be recognized by transposase enzymes. A composite transposon, however, is flanked by two separate IS elements which may or may not be exact replicas.Membrane protein: Membrane proteins are proteins that interact with biological membranes. They are one of the common types of protein along with soluble globular proteins, fibrous proteins, and disordered proteins.Verotoxin-producing Escherichia coliAAA proteins: For other uses see AAA (disambiguation)Pathogenic Escherichia coli: Escherichia coli ( Anglicized to ; commonly abbreviated E. coli) is a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms (endotherms).Adaptive mutation: Adaptive mutation is a controversial evolutionary theory. It posits that mutations, or genetic changes, are much less random and more purposeful than traditional evolution.GC box: In molecular biology, a GC box is a distinct pattern of nucleotides found in the promoter region of some eukaryotic genes upstream of the TATA box and approximately 110 bases upstream from the transcription initiation site. It has a consensus sequence GGGCGG which is position dependent and orientation independent.Fishpaper: Fish paper or fishpaper is a strong, flexible, fibrous dielectric paper. It resists moderate heat and mechanical injury, and is often used for wrapping coils and insulating stove-top parts.Avery–MacLeod–McCarty experimentRecombination (cosmology): In cosmology, recombination refers to the epoch at which charged electrons and protons first became bound to form electrically neutral hydrogen atoms.Note that the term recombination is a misnomer, considering that it represents the first time that electrically neutral hydrogen formed.Nucleic acid structure: Nucleic acid structure refers to the structure of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA. Chemically speaking, DNA and RNA are very similar.Virulence: Virulence is, by MeSH definition, the degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of parasites as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenicity of an organism - its ability to cause disease - is determined by its virulence factors.Cell membraneInternal ribosome entry site: An internal ribosome entry site, abbreviated IRES, is a nucleotide sequence that allows for translation initiation in the middle of a messenger RNA (mRNA) sequence as part of the greater process of protein synthesis. Usually, in eukaryotes, translation can be initiated only at the 5' end of the mRNA molecule, since 5' cap recognition is required for the assembly of the initiation complex.Beta-lactamaseThermal cyclerLambda phageMcIntosh and Filde's anaerobic jar: McIntosh and Filde's anaerobic jar is an instrument used in the production of an anaerobic environment. This method of anaerobiosis as others is used to culture bacteria which die or fail to grow in presence of oxygen (anaerobes).Suppressor mutation: A suppressor mutation is a second mutation that alleviates or reverts the phenotypic effects of an already existing mutation. Genetic suppression therefore restores the phenotype seen prior to the original background mutation.Shiga toxin: Shiga toxins are a family of related toxins with two major groups, Stx1 and Stx2, expressed by genes considered to be part of the genome of lambdoid prophages. The toxins are named for Kiyoshi Shiga, who first described the bacterial origin of dysentery caused by Shigella dysenteriae.Maltose-binding protein: Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP) is a part of the maltose/maltodextrin system of Escherichia coli, which is responsible for the uptake and efficient catabolism of maltodextrins. It is a complex regulatory and transport system involving many proteins and protein complexes.

(1/79677) Automated food microbiology: potential for the hydrophobic grid-membrane filter.

Bacterial counts obtained on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters were comparable to conventional plate counts for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus in homogenates from a range of foods. The wide numerical operating range of the hydrophobic grid-membrane filters allowed sequential diluting to be reduced or even eliminated, making them attractive as components in automated systems of analysis. Food debris could be rinsed completely from the unincubated hydrophobic grid-membrane filter surface without affecting the subsequent count, thus eliminating the possibility of counting food particles, a common source of error in electronic counting systems.  (+info)

(2/79677) Effects of dispersed recreational activities on the microbiological quality of forest surface water.

The microbiological quality of forest surface waters in the Greenwater River watershed was examined to investigate the influence of heavy motorized camping in an area with no sanitary facilities. Indicator densities increased during weekend human-use periods when compared to weekdays. Increases in indicator densities were also noted downstream from heavily used camping areas when compared to upstream sites. Seasonal, weekly, and diurnal fluctuations in indicator densities were observed. This study suggests that potential health hazards exist in this watershed during periods of human use.  (+info)

(3/79677) Fecal coliform elevated-temperature test: a physiological basis.

The physiological basis of the Eijkman elevated-temperature test for differentiating fecal from nonfecal coliforms was investigated. Manometric studies indicated that the inhibitory effect upon growth and metabolism in a nonfecal coliform at 44.5 degrees C involved cellular components common to both aerobic and fermentative metabolism of lactose. Radioactive substrate incorporation experiments implicated cell membrane function as a principal focus for temperature sensitivity at 44.5 degrees C. A temperature increase from 35 to 44.5 degrees C drastically reduced the rates of [14C]glucose uptake in nonfecal coliforms, whereas those of fecal coliforms were essentially unchanged. In addition, relatively low levels of nonfecal coliform beta-galactosidase activity coupled with thermal inactivation of this enzyme at a comparatively low temperature may also inhibit growth and metabolism of nonfecal coliforms at the elevated temperature.  (+info)

(4/79677) Mechanism and specificity of the terminal thioesterase domain from the erythromycin polyketide synthase.

BACKGROUND: Polyketides are important compounds with antibiotic and anticancer activities. Several modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) contain a terminal thioesterase (TE) domain probably responsible for the release and concomitant cyclization of the fully processed polyketide chain. Because the TE domain influences qualitative aspects of product formation by engineered PKSs, its mechanism and specificity are of considerable interest. RESULTS: The TE domain of the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. When tested against a set of N-acetyl cysteamine thioesters the TE domain did not act as a cyclase, but showed significant hydrolytic specificity towards substrates that mimic important features of its natural substrate. Also the overall rate of polyketide chain release was strongly enhanced by a covalent connection between the TE domain and the terminal PKS module (by as much as 100-fold compared with separate TE and PKS 'domains'). CONCLUSIONS: The inability of the TE domain alone to catalyze cyclization suggests that macrocycle formation results from the combined action of the TE domain and a PKS module. The chain-length and stereochemical preferences of the TE domain might be relevant in the design and engineered biosynthesis of certain novel polyketides. Our results also suggest that the TE domain might loop back to catalyze the release of polyketide chains from both terminal and pre-terminal modules, which may explain the ability of certain naturally occurring PKSs, such as the picromycin synthase, to generate both 12-membered and 14-membered macrolide antibiotics.  (+info)

(5/79677) Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and insecticide resistance in insects.

Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in many cases of resistance of insects to insecticides. Resistance has long been associated with an increase in monooxygenase activities and with an increase in cytochrome P450 content. However, this increase does not always account for all of the resistance. In Drosophila melanogaster, we have shown that the overproduction of cytochrome P450 can be lost by the fly without a corresponding complete loss of resistance. These results prompted the sequencing of a cytochrome P450 candidate for resistance in resistant and susceptible flies. Several mutations leading to amino-acid substitutions have been detected in the P450 gene CYP6A2 of a resistant strain. The location of these mutations in a model of the 3D structure of the CYP6A2 protein suggested that some of them may be important for enzyme activity of this molecule. This has been verified by heterologous expression of wild-type and mutated cDNA in Escherichia coli. When other resistance mechanisms are considered, relatively few genetic mutations are involved in insecticide resistance, and this has led to an optimistic view of the management of resistance. Our observations compel us to survey in more detail the genetic diversity of cytochrome P450 genes and alleles involved in resistance.  (+info)

(6/79677) A single membrane-embedded negative charge is critical for recognizing positively charged drugs by the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance protein MdfA.

The nature of the broad substrate specificity phenomenon, as manifested by multidrug resistance proteins, is not yet understood. In the Escherichia coli multidrug transporter, MdfA, the hydrophobicity profile and PhoA fusion analysis have so far identified only one membrane-embedded charged amino acid residue (E26). In order to determine whether this negatively charged residue may play a role in multidrug recognition, we evaluated the expression and function of MdfA constructs mutated at this position. Replacing E26 with the positively charged residue lysine abolished the multidrug resistance activity against positively charged drugs, but retained chloramphenicol efflux and resistance. In contrast, when the negative charge was preserved in a mutant with aspartate instead of E26, chloramphenicol recognition and transport were drastically inhibited; however, the mutant exhibited almost wild-type multidrug resistance activity against lipophilic cations. These results suggest that although the negative charge at position 26 is not essential for active transport, it dictates the multidrug resistance character of MdfA. We show that such a negative charge is also found in other drug resistance transporters, and its possible significance regarding multidrug resistance is discussed.  (+info)

(7/79677) Membrane deinsertion of SecA underlying proton motive force-dependent stimulation of protein translocation.

The proton motive force (PMF) renders protein translocation across the Escherichia coli membrane highly efficient, although the underlying mechanism has not been clarified. The membrane insertion and deinsertion of SecA coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively, are thought to drive the translocation. We report here that PMF significantly decreases the level of membrane-inserted SecA. The prlA4 mutation of SecY, which causes efficient protein translocation in the absence of PMF, was found to reduce the membrane-inserted SecA irrespective of the presence or absence of PMF. The PMF-dependent decrease in the membrane-inserted SecA caused an increase in the amount of SecA released into the extra-membrane milieu, indicating that PMF deinserts SecA from the membrane. The PMF-dependent deinsertion reduced the amount of SecA required for maximal translocation activity. Neither ATP hydrolysis nor exchange with external SecA was required for the PMF-dependent deinsertion of SecA. These results indicate that the SecA deinsertion is a limiting step of protein translocation and is accelerated by PMF, efficient protein translocation thereby being caused in the presence of PMF.  (+info)

(8/79677) Hsp60 is targeted to a cryptic mitochondrion-derived organelle ("crypton") in the microaerophilic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

Entamoeba histolytica is a microaerophilic protozoan parasite in which neither mitochondria nor mitochondrion-derived organelles have been previously observed. Recently, a segment of an E. histolytica gene was identified that encoded a protein similar to the mitochondrial 60-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60 or chaperonin 60), which refolds nuclear-encoded proteins after passage through organellar membranes. The possible function and localization of the amebic Hsp60 were explored here. Like Hsp60 of mitochondria, amebic Hsp60 RNA and protein were both strongly induced by incubating parasites at 42 degreesC. 5' and 3' rapid amplifications of cDNA ends were used to obtain the entire E. histolytica hsp60 coding region, which predicted a 536-amino-acid Hsp60. The E. histolytica hsp60 gene protected from heat shock Escherichia coli groEL mutants, demonstrating the chaperonin function of the amebic Hsp60. The E. histolytica Hsp60, which lacked characteristic carboxy-terminal Gly-Met repeats, had a 21-amino-acid amino-terminal, organelle-targeting presequence that was cleaved in vivo. This presequence was necessary to target Hsp60 to one (and occasionally two or three) short, cylindrical organelle(s). In contrast, amebic alcohol dehydrogenase 1 and ferredoxin, which are bacteria-like enzymes, were diffusely distributed throughout the cytosol. We suggest that the Hsp60-associated, mitochondrion-derived organelle identified here be named "crypton," as its structure was previously hidden and its function is still cryptic.  (+info)


Can you write about an important facts about Escherichia coli?


Can you write about an important facts about (Pathogen)
Escherichia coli?
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Oh I'm quite certain that I can.


Escherichia coli in the vegetables in Europe?


Hi, recently there are a lot of Escherichia coli bacteria in the vegetables in europe )mostly from germany and spain). But not here where I live (also europe). But I am still scared of the bacteria .. some people already died because of that ..
What will Escherichia coli bacteria do in our bodies? And are the chances for death big?
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This is a very dangerous outbreak. From yahoo.com:

"The scientists said the outbreak, which has killed 17 and made more than 1,500 others ill in at least 10 European countries and is thought to come from vegetables, carried genes making it resistant to several classes of antibiotics."

My advice would be not to eat ANYTHING raw. Proper cooking kills e-coli (that's why it's so much more dangerous in veggies than in meat).

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110602/hl_nm/us_ecoli


What harm can the increase of e-coli bring to the environment?


Escherichia coli, also known as E. coli is a bacterium that is commonly found in the gut of endotherms (warm blooded organisms). Several types of E. coli exist as part of the normal flora of the human gut and have several beneficial functions, such as the production of vitamin K2. They also prevent harmful bacteria, known as pathogenic bacteria, from establishing themselves in the intestine
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Why are we constantly warned to make sure that hamburger and other meats are cooked thoroughly?


a. To displace taste and odor caused by contaminating bacteria.  
b. To eliminate viruses transmitted in raw meat.  
c. To warn people to provide enough heat to kill Escherichia coli O157:H7 contaminating the meat.  
d. To prevent the spread of Lyme disease.  
e. To remove flesh-eating bacteria.
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Hamburger is meat that has gone through a meat grinder. This means that every single part of the meat has probably been exposed to some kind of bacteria (compared to a steak which only has a few cuts that are guaranteed to be cooked well above proper temperatures). I would say that the answer is C. I remember my teacher mentioning that kids died because of e. coli poisoning from an undercooked burger.


What happens if a person gets a bunch of sicknesses at the same time?


What I mean is like if a person is exposed to everything at the same time like flu, cold, ebola, aids, sars, escherichia coli, asma, chicken pox (first timer), tetanus, and anything else eye kant think of right now? and also what happenes if a person is injected by all of these viruses at the same time? no i dont want to find out by expirience but any guesses?
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either they would all cancel out each other or the person would die.


How much water do you drink a day?


Did you know this little known fact?

Water vs Wine......Newest health information...

It has been scientifically proven that if we drink 1 liter of water each day, at the end of the year we would have absorbed more than 1 kilo of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria found in feces.

In other words, we are consuming 1 kilo of Poo. However, we do not run  that risk when drinking wine (or rum, whiskey, beer or other liquor) because alcohol has to go through a purification process of boiling, filtering and/or fermenting.

WATER = Poo
WINE = HEALTH

Ergo: It is better to drink wine and talk stupid than to drink water and be full of crap. There is no need to thank me for this valuable information....I am doing it as a public service!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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I am drinking lots of crap but offsetting the negative effects by consuming lots of red wine.  Thanks for the info!


What is part of the normal microbiota of the human intestine that help protect against disease?


A. Vibrio Cholerae
B. Staphylococcus aureus
C. Salmonella typhi
D.Escherichia coli
E. All of the above
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My girlfriend has Escherichia coli, are we allowed to have sex?


My girlfriend recently her urine tested and found out she has e-coli. She has been taken prescribed anti-biotics for a couple of weeks. My question is it advisable that we have sex during her treatment.
Both of us want to do it, I just wanted to check from a medical perspective if it is advisable.
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No, that's the reason she got E-coli, so stop thinking about yourself and wait.