Dermatitis, Atopic: A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.Dermatitis: Any inflammation of the skin.Dermatitis, Allergic Contact: A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Rare, chronic, papulo-vesicular disease characterized by an intensely pruritic eruption consisting of various combinations of symmetrical, erythematous, papular, vesicular, or bullous lesions. The disease is strongly associated with the presence of HLA-B8 and HLA-DR3 antigens. A variety of different autoantibodies has been detected in small numbers in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis.Dermatitis, Seborrheic: A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin with unknown etiology. It is characterized by moderate ERYTHEMA, dry, moist, or greasy (SEBACEOUS GLAND) scaling and yellow crusted patches on various areas, especially the scalp, that exfoliate as dandruff. Seborrheic dermatitis is common in children and adolescents with HIV INFECTIONS.Dermatitis, Occupational: A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.Dermatitis, Irritant: A non-allergic contact dermatitis caused by prolonged exposure to irritants and not explained by delayed hypersensitivity mechanisms.Dermatitis, Contact: A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.Patch Tests: Skin tests in which the sensitizer is applied to a patch of cotton cloth or gauze held in place for approximately 48-72 hours. It is used for the elicitation of a contact hypersensitivity reaction.Dermatitis, Perioral: A papular eruption of unknown etiology that progresses to residual papular erythema and scaling usually confined to the area of the mouth, and almost exclusively occurring in young women. It may also be localized or extend to involve the eyelids and adjacent glabella area of the forehead (periocular dermatitis). (Dorland, 28th ed)Dermatitis, Exfoliative: The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Pruritus: An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.Radiodermatitis: A cutaneous inflammatory reaction occurring as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Facial DermatosesImmunoglobulin E: An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Dermatologic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.Emollients: Oleagenous substances used topically to soothe, soften or protect skin or mucous membranes. They are used also as vehicles for other dermatologic agents.Hand DermatosesDigital Dermatitis: Highly contagious infectious dermatitis with lesions near the interdigital spaces usually in cattle. It causes discomfort and often severe lameness (LAMENESS, ANIMAL). Lesions can be either erosive or proliferative and wart-like with papillary growths and hypertrophied hairs. DICHELOBACTER NODOSUS and TREPONEMA are the most commonly associated causative agents for this mixed bacterial infection disease.Eczema: A pruritic papulovesicular dermatitis occurring as a reaction to many endogenous and exogenous agents (Dorland, 27th ed).Skin Diseases, Parasitic: Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.Dermatitis, Photoallergic: A delayed hypersensitivity involving the reaction between sunlight or other radiant energy source and a chemical substance to which the individual has been previously exposed and sensitized. It manifests as a papulovesicular, eczematous, or exudative dermatitis occurring chiefly on the light-exposed areas of the skin.Diaper Rash: A type of irritant dermatitis localized to the area in contact with a diaper and occurring most often as a reaction to prolonged contact with urine, feces, or retained soap or detergent.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Schistosomatidae: A family of blood flukes of the class Trematoda which is found in animals and man. It Includes the genera Heterobilharzia, Schistosomatium, Schistosoma, Ornithobilharzia, Bilharziella, Trichobilharzia, Pseudobilharzia, and Austrobilharzia.Ointments: Semisolid preparations used topically for protective emollient effects or as a vehicle for local administration of medications. Ointment bases are various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons.Dermatitis, Toxicodendron: An allergic contact dermatitis caused by exposure to plants of the genus Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus). These include poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac, all plants that contain the substance urushiol, a potent skin sensitizing agent. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Psoriasis: A common genetically determined, chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by rounded erythematous, dry, scaling patches. The lesions have a predilection for nails, scalp, genitalia, extensor surfaces, and the lumbosacral region. Accelerated epidermopoiesis is considered to be the fundamental pathologic feature in psoriasis.Irritants: Drugs that act locally on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces to produce inflammation; those that cause redness due to hyperemia are rubefacients; those that raise blisters are vesicants and those that penetrate sebaceous glands and cause abscesses are pustulants; tear gases and mustard gases are also irritants.Allergens: Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Skin Cream: A water-soluble medicinal preparation applied to the skin.Skin DiseasesOxazolone: Immunologic adjuvant and sensitizing agent.Antipruritics: Agents, usually topical, that relieve itching (pruritus).Food Hypersensitivity: Gastrointestinal disturbances, skin eruptions, or shock due to allergic reactions to allergens in food.Drug Eruptions: Adverse cutaneous reactions caused by ingestion, parenteral use, or local application of a drug. These may assume various morphologic patterns and produce various types of lesions.Dermatomycoses: Superficial infections of the skin or its appendages by any of various fungi.Erythema: Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.Kaposi Varicelliform Eruption: A disseminated vesicular-pustular eruption caused by the herpes simplex virus (HERPESVIRUS HOMINIS), the VACCINIA VIRUS, or Varicella zoster (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN). It is usually superimposed on a preexisting, inactive or active, atopic dermatitis (DERMATITIS, ATOPIC).Water Loss, Insensible: Loss of water by diffusion through the skin and by evaporation from the respiratory tract.Rosacea: A cutaneous disorder primarily of convexities of the central part of the FACE, such as FOREHEAD; CHEEK; NOSE; and CHIN. It is characterized by FLUSHING; ERYTHEMA; EDEMA; RHINOPHYMA; papules; and ocular symptoms. It may occur at any age but typically after age 30. There are various subtypes of rosacea: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular (National Rosacea Society's Expert Committee on the Classification and Staging of Rosacea, J Am Acad Dermatol 2002; 46:584-7).Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Dinitrofluorobenzene: Irritants and reagents for labeling terminal amino acid groups.Gloves, Protective: Coverings for the hands, usually with separations for the fingers, made of various materials, for protection against infections, toxic substances, extremes of hot and cold, radiations, water immersion, etc. The gloves may be worn by patients, care givers, housewives, laboratory and industrial workers, police, etc.Keratinocytes: Epidermal cells which synthesize keratin and undergo characteristic changes as they move upward from the basal layers of the epidermis to the cornified (horny) layer of the skin. Successive stages of differentiation of the keratinocytes forming the epidermal layers are basal cell, spinous or prickle cell, and the granular cell.Epidermis: The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).Skin Care: Maintenance of the hygienic state of the skin under optimal conditions of cleanliness and comfort. Effective in skin care are proper washing, bathing, cleansing, and the use of soaps, detergents, oils, etc. In various disease states, therapeutic and protective solutions and ointments are useful. The care of the skin is particularly important in various occupations, in exposure to sunlight, in neonates, and in PRESSURE ULCER.Ear, External: The outer part of the hearing system of the body. It includes the shell-like EAR AURICLE which collects sound, and the EXTERNAL EAR CANAL, the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE, and the EXTERNAL EAR CARTILAGES.Factitious Disorders: Disorders characterized by physical or psychological symptoms that are not real, genuine, or natural.Picryl Chloride: A hapten that generates suppressor cells capable of down-regulating the efferent phase of trinitrophenol-specific contact hypersensitivity. (Arthritis Rheum 1991 Feb;34(2):180).Glutens: Prolamins in the endosperm of SEEDS from the Triticeae tribe which includes species of WHEAT; BARLEY; and RYE.Skin Diseases, Vesiculobullous: Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)Intertrigo: A superficial dermatitis occurring on skin surfaces in contact with each other, such as the axillae, neck creases, intergluteal fold, between the toes, etc. Obesity is a predisposing factor. The condition is caused by moisture and friction and is characterized by erythema, maceration, burning, and exudation.Hoof and Claw: Highly keratinized processes that are sharp and curved, or flat with pointed margins. They are found especially at the end of the limbs in certain animals.Cosmetics: Substances intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions. Included in this definition are skin creams, lotions, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product. (U.S. Food & Drug Administration Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics Fact Sheet (web page) Feb 1995)Skin Diseases, Infectious: Skin diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, parasites, or viruses.Administration, Cutaneous: The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.Dermatology: A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.PhenylenediaminesHypersensitivity: Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.Staphylococcal Skin Infections: Infections to the skin caused by bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Foot Diseases: Anatomical and functional disorders affecting the foot.Intermediate Filament Proteins: Filaments 7-11 nm in diameter found in the cytoplasm of all cells. Many specific proteins belong to this group, e.g., desmin, vimentin, prekeratin, decamin, skeletin, neurofilin, neurofilament protein, and glial fibrillary acid protein.Jewelry: Objects of precious metal usually containing gems and worn to enhance personal appearance. Health concerns include possible contamination from lead content or bacteria.Skin Diseases, Viral: Skin diseases caused by viruses.Skin UlcerAnti-Allergic Agents: Agents that are used to treat allergic reactions. Most of these drugs act by preventing the release of inflammatory mediators or inhibiting the actions of released mediators on their target cells. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p475)Celiac Disease: A malabsorption syndrome that is precipitated by the ingestion of foods containing GLUTEN, such as wheat, rye, and barley. It is characterized by INFLAMMATION of the SMALL INTESTINE, loss of MICROVILLI structure, failed INTESTINAL ABSORPTION, and MALNUTRITION.Hair Preparations: Hair grooming, cleansing and modifying products meant for topical application to hair, usually human. They include sprays, bleaches, dyes, conditioners, rinses, shampoos, nutrient lotions, etc.Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Hypersensitivity, Immediate: Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.Petrolatum: A colloidal system of semisolid hydrocarbons obtained from PETROLEUM. It is used as an ointment base, topical protectant, and lubricant.Th2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Tacrolimus: A macrolide isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Streptomyces tsukubaensis that has strong immunosuppressive activity in vivo and prevents the activation of T-lymphocytes in response to antigenic or mitogenic stimulation in vitro.Latex Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to products containing processed natural rubber latex such as rubber gloves, condoms, catheters, dental dams, balloons, and sporting equipment. Both T-cell mediated (HYPERSENSITIVITY, DELAYED) and IgE antibody-mediated (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE) allergic responses are possible. Delayed hypersensitivity results from exposure to antioxidants present in the rubber; immediate hypersensitivity results from exposure to a latex protein.Treponemal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus TREPONEMA.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Foot Dermatoses: Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified.Chemokine CCL27: A CC-type chemokine with specificity for CCR10 RECEPTORS. It is constitutively expressed in the skin and may play a role in T-CELL trafficking during cutaneous INFLAMMATION.Dapsone: A sulfone active against a wide range of bacteria but mainly employed for its actions against MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE. Its mechanism of action is probably similar to that of the SULFONAMIDES which involves inhibition of folic acid synthesis in susceptible organisms. It is also used with PYRIMETHAMINE in the treatment of malaria. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p157-8)Urticaria: A vascular reaction of the skin characterized by erythema and wheal formation due to localized increase of vascular permeability. The causative mechanism may be allergy, infection, or stress.Nickel: A trace element with the atomic symbol Ni, atomic number 28, and atomic weight 58.69. It is a cofactor of the enzyme UREASE.Candidiasis, Cutaneous: Candidiasis of the skin manifested as eczema-like lesions of the interdigital spaces, perleche, or chronic paronychia. (Dorland, 27th ed)Leg Dermatoses: A nonspecific term used to denote any cutaneous lesion or group of lesions, or eruptions of any type on the leg. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Fluocinonide: A topical glucocorticoid used in the treatment of ECZEMA.Scalp DermatosesMites: Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.Ear: The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.Interleukin-4: A soluble factor produced by activated T-LYMPHOCYTES that induces the expression of MHC CLASS II GENES and FC RECEPTORS on B-LYMPHOCYTES and causes their proliferation and differentiation. It also acts on T-lymphocytes, MAST CELLS, and several other hematopoietic lineage cells.Folliculitis: Inflammation of follicles, primarily hair follicles.Lichen Planus: An inflammatory, pruritic disease of the skin and mucous membranes, which can be either generalized or localized. It is characterized by distinctive purplish, flat-topped papules having a predilection for the trunk and flexor surfaces. The lesions may be discrete or coalesce to form plaques. Histologically, there is a "saw-tooth" pattern of epidermal hyperplasia and vacuolar alteration of the basal layer of the epidermis along with an intense upper dermal inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of T-cells. Etiology is unknown.Histamine H1 Antagonists: Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.Molluscum Contagiosum: A common, benign, usually self-limited viral infection of the skin and occasionally the conjunctivae by a poxvirus (MOLLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM VIRUS). (Dorland, 27th ed)Ultraviolet Therapy: The use of ultraviolet electromagnetic radiation in the treatment of disease, usually of the skin. This is the part of the sun's spectrum that causes sunburn and tanning. Ultraviolet A, used in PUVA, is closer to visible light and less damaging than Ultraviolet B, which is ionizing.Chemokine CCL17: A CC-type chemokine that is found at high levels in the THYMUS and has specificity for CCR4 RECEPTORS. It is synthesized by DENDRITIC CELLS; ENDOTHELIAL CELLS; KERATINOCYTES; and FIBROBLASTS.Treponema: A genus of microorganisms of the order SPIROCHAETALES, many of which are pathogenic and parasitic for man and animals.Ichthyosis Vulgaris: Most common form of ICHTHYOSIS characterized by prominent scaling especially on the exterior surfaces of the extremities. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.Adrenal Cortex HormonesHaptens: Small antigenic determinants capable of eliciting an immune response only when coupled to a carrier. Haptens bind to antibodies but by themselves cannot elicit an antibody response.Pellagra: A disease due to deficiency of NIACIN, a B-complex vitamin, or its precursor TRYPTOPHAN. It is characterized by scaly DERMATITIS which is often associated with DIARRHEA and DEMENTIA (the three D's).Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Mast Cells: Granulated cells that are found in almost all tissues, most abundantly in the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Like the BASOPHILS, mast cells contain large amounts of HISTAMINE and HEPARIN. Unlike basophils, mast cells normally remain in the tissues and do not circulate in the blood. Mast cells, derived from the bone marrow stem cells, are regulated by the STEM CELL FACTOR.Skin Diseases, Papulosquamous: A group of dermatoses with distinct morphologic features. The primary lesion is most commonly a papule, usually erythematous, with a variable degree of scaling on the surface. Plaques form through the coalescing of primary lesions.Pyroglyphidae: Family of house dust mites, in the superfamily Analgoidea, order Astigmata. They include the genera Dermatophagoides and Euroglyphus.Eosinophils: Granular leukocytes with a nucleus that usually has two lobes connected by a slender thread of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing coarse, round granules that are uniform in size and stainable by eosin.Calendula: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain CAROTENOIDS, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE), flavonoids, mucilage, SAPONINS, and STEROLS. The plants are used both topically and internally. The common name of Marigold is also used for TAGETES.Photosensitivity Disorders: Abnormal responses to sunlight or artificial light due to extreme reactivity of light-absorbing molecules in tissues. It refers almost exclusively to skin photosensitivity, including sunburn, reactions due to repeated prolonged exposure in the absence of photosensitizing factors, and reactions requiring photosensitizing factors such as photosensitizing agents and certain diseases. With restricted reference to skin tissue, it does not include photosensitivity of the eye to light, as in photophobia or photosensitive epilepsy.Radioallergosorbent Test: An in vitro allergen radioimmunoassay in which allergens are coupled to an immunosorbent. The coupled allergens bind the IgE in the sera of patients which in turn binds radioisotope-labeled anti-IMMUNOGLOBULIN E antibodies.Rhabditida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order RHABDITIDA.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Diapers, Adult: Absorbent pads designed to be worn as underpants or pants liners by adults.Antigens, Dermatophagoides: Antigens from the house dust mites (DERMATOPHAGOIDES), mainly D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus. They are proteins, found in mite feces or mite extracts, that can cause ASTHMA and other allergic diseases such as perennial rhinitis (RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, PERENNIAL) and atopic dermatitis (DERMATITIS, ATOPIC). More than 11 groups of Dermatophagoides ALLERGENS have been defined. Group I allergens, such as Der f I and Der p I from the above two species, are among the strongest mite immunogens in humans.Dermis: A layer of vascularized connective tissue underneath the EPIDERMIS. The surface of the dermis contains innervated papillae. Embedded in or beneath the dermis are SWEAT GLANDS; HAIR FOLLICLES; and SEBACEOUS GLANDS.Interleukin-13: A cytokine synthesized by T-LYMPHOCYTES that produces proliferation, immunoglobulin isotype switching, and immunoglobulin production by immature B-LYMPHOCYTES. It appears to play a role in regulating inflammatory and immune responses.Galactosylgalactosylglucosylceramidase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a ceramidetrihexoside to a ceramidedihexoside plus galactose.Hyperpigmentation: Excessive pigmentation of the skin, usually as a result of increased epidermal or dermal melanin pigmentation, hypermelanosis. Hyperpigmentation can be localized or generalized. The condition may arise from exposure to light, chemicals or other substances, or from a primary metabolic imbalance.Dermatitis, Phototoxic: A nonimmunologic, chemically induced type of photosensitivity producing a sometimes vesiculating dermatitis. It results in hyperpigmentation and desquamation of the light-exposed areas of the skin.Gloves, Surgical: Gloves, usually rubber, worn by surgeons, examining physicians, dentists, and other health personnel for the mutual protection of personnel and patient.Lichenoid Eruptions: Conditions in which there is histological damage to the lower epidermis along with a grouped chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the papillary dermis disturbing the interface between the epidermis and dermis. LICHEN PLANUS is the prototype of all lichenoid eruptions. (From Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p398)Dinitrochlorobenzene: A skin irritant that may cause dermatitis of both primary and allergic types. Contact sensitization with DNCB has been used as a measure of cellular immunity. DNCB is also used as a reagent for the detection and determination of pyridine compounds.Receptors, CCR4: CCR receptors with specificity for CHEMOKINE CCL17 and CHEMOKINE CCL22. They are expressed at high levels in T-LYMPHOCYTES; MAST CELLS; DENDRITIC CELLS; and NK CELLS.Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial: Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the nose similar to that found in hay fever except that symptoms persist throughout the year. The causes are usually air-borne allergens, particularly dusts, feathers, molds, animal fur, etc.Staphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Lawsonia Plant: A plant genus of the family LYTHRACEAE that is the source of henna and has cytotoxic activity.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Langerhans Cells: Recirculating, dendritic, antigen-presenting cells containing characteristic racket-shaped granules (Birbeck granules). They are found principally in the stratum spinosum of the EPIDERMIS and are rich in Class II MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX molecules. Langerhans cells were the first dendritic cell to be described and have been a model of study for other dendritic cells (DCs), especially other migrating DCs such as dermal DCs and INTERSTITIAL DENDRITIC CELLS.Rhinitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA, the mucous membrane lining the NASAL CAVITIES.Conjunctivitis, Allergic: Conjunctivitis due to hypersensitivity to various allergens.Egg Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to eggs that is triggered by the immune system.Superantigens: Microbial antigens that have in common an extremely potent activating effect on T-cells that bear a specific variable region. Superantigens cross-link the variable region with class II MHC proteins regardless of the peptide binding in the T-cell receptor's pocket. The result is a transient expansion and subsequent death and anergy of the T-cells with the appropriate variable regions.Acneiform Eruptions: Visible efflorescent lesions of the skin caused by acne or resembling acne. (Dorland, 28th ed, p18, 575)Laughter Therapy: Therapeutic use of humor and laughter to improve emotional well being and health.Flurandrenolone: A corticosteroid used topically in the treatment of various skin disorders. It is usually employed as a cream or an ointment, and is also used as a polyethylene tape with an adhesive. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p733)Sebum: The oily substance secreted by SEBACEOUS GLANDS. It is composed of KERATIN, fat, and cellular debris.Interleukin-5: A cytokine that promotes differentiation and activation of EOSINOPHILS. It also triggers activated B-LYMPHOCYTES to differentiate into IMMUNOGLOBULIN-secreting cells.Croton Oil: Viscous, nauseating oil obtained from the shrub Croton tiglium (Euphorbaceae). It is a vesicant and skin irritant used as pharmacologic standard for skin inflammation and allergy and causes skin cancer. It was formerly used as an emetic and cathartic with frequent mortality.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Betamethasone Valerate: The 17-valerate derivative of BETAMETHASONE. It has substantial topical anti-inflammatory activity and relatively low systemic anti-inflammatory activity.Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal: Allergic rhinitis that occurs at the same time every year. It is characterized by acute CONJUNCTIVITIS with lacrimation and ITCHING, and regarded as an allergic condition triggered by specific ALLERGENS.TextilesVulvar Diseases: Pathological processes of the VULVA.Job Syndrome: Primary immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by recurrent infections and hyperimmunoglobulinemia E. Most cases are sporadic. Of the rare familial forms, the dominantly inherited subtype has additional connective tissue, dental and skeletal involvement that the recessive type does not share.Intradermal Tests: Skin tests in which the sensitizer is injected.Diarylheptanoids: A group of compounds consisting of two aromatic rings separated by seven carbons (HEPTANES) and having various substituents. The best known member is CURCUMIN.Mice, Inbred BALB CTattooing: The indelible marking of TISSUES, primarily SKIN, by pricking it with NEEDLES to imbed various COLORING AGENTS. Tattooing of the CORNEA is done to colorize LEUKOMA spots.Hypopigmentation: A condition caused by a deficiency or a loss of melanin pigmentation in the epidermis, also known as hypomelanosis. Hypopigmentation can be localized or generalized, and may result from genetic defects, trauma, inflammation, or infections.Beauty CultureChronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Keratosis: Any horny growth such as a wart or callus.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Neurodermatitis: An extremely variable eczematous skin disease that is presumed to be a response to prolonged vigorous scratching, rubbing, or pinching to relieve intense pruritus. It varies in intensity, severity, course, and morphologic expression in different individuals. Neurodermatitis is believed by some to be psychogenic. The circumscribed or localized form is often referred to as lichen simplex chronicus.Perfume: A substance, extract, or preparation for diffusing or imparting an agreeable or attractive smell, especially a fluid containing fragrant natural oils extracted from flowers, woods, etc., or similar synthetic oils. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Rubber: A high-molecular-weight polymeric elastomer derived from the milk juice (LATEX) of HEVEA brasiliensis and other trees and plants. It is a substance that can be stretched at room temperature to at least twice its original length and after releasing the stress, retract rapidly, and recover its original dimensions fully.Interferon-gamma: The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.Acne Vulgaris: A chronic disorder of the pilosebaceous apparatus associated with an increase in sebum secretion. It is characterized by open comedones (blackheads), closed comedones (whiteheads), and pustular nodules. The cause is unknown, but heredity and age are predisposing factors.Local Lymph Node Assay: The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is an alternative method for the identification of chemicals that have the ability to cause skin sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis. Endpoints have been established so fewer animals are required and less painful procedures are used.Jejunum: The middle portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between DUODENUM and ILEUM. It represents about 2/5 of the remaining portion of the small intestine below duodenum.Humulus: A plant genus in the CANNABACEAE family. Best known for the buds of Humulus lupulus L. used in BEER.Mice, Hairless: Mutant strains of mice that produce little or no hair.Milk Hypersensitivity: Allergic reaction to milk (usually cow's milk) or milk products. MILK HYPERSENSITIVITY should be differentiated from LACTOSE INTOLERANCE, an intolerance to milk as a result of congenital deficiency of lactase.Betamethasone: A glucocorticoid given orally, parenterally, by local injection, by inhalation, or applied topically in the management of various disorders in which corticosteroids are indicated. Its lack of mineralocorticoid properties makes betamethasone particularly suitable for treating cerebral edema and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p724)Drug Hypersensitivity: Immunologically mediated adverse reactions to medicinal substances used legally or illegally.Hydroxyzine: A histamine H1 receptor antagonist that is effective in the treatment of chronic urticaria, dermatitis, and histamine-mediated pruritus. Unlike its major metabolite CETIRIZINE, it does cause drowsiness. It is also effective as an antiemetic, for relief of anxiety and tension, and as a sedative.PrintingDermatophagoides farinae: Species of American house dust mite, in the family PYROGLYPHIDAE.Edema: Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.Pyoderma: Any purulent skin disease (Dorland, 27th ed).Histamine: An amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of HISTIDINE. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Immunoglobulin A: Represents 15-20% of the human serum immunoglobulins, mostly as the 4-chain polymer in humans or dimer in other mammals. Secretory IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) is the main immunoglobulin in secretions.Chemokine CCL22: A CC-type chemokine with specificity for CCR4 RECEPTORS. It has activity towards TH2 CELLS and TC2 CELLS.Incontinence Pads: Absorbent pads used for URINARY INCONTINENCE and usually worn as underpants or pants liners by the ELDERLY.Scabies: A contagious cutaneous inflammation caused by the bite of the mite SARCOPTES SCABIEI. It is characterized by pruritic papular eruptions and burrows and affects primarily the axillae, elbows, wrists, and genitalia, although it can spread to cover the entire body.Histamine Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. Classical antihistaminics block the histamine H1 receptors only.Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Construction Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of building.Agricultural Workers' Diseases: Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.

*  Atopic Dermatitis: Get the Facts on This Type of Eczema
... Pill Identifier Search. Drugs A-Z. Pill Identifier. Supplements. Slideshows. Symptom Checker. Diseases. Dictionary. atopic dermatitis article. Atopic Dermatitis. Eczema Atopic Dermatitis Slideshow Pictures. Adult Skin Problems Slideshow Pictures. Cole, MD, FAAD. Cole, MD, FAAD Dr. Cole is board certified in dermatology. He obtained his BA degree in bacteriology, his MA degree in microbiology, and his MD at the University of California, Los Angeles. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. Atopic dermatitis facts. What is atopic dermatitis. What is the difference between atopic dermatitis and eczema. How common is atopic dermatitis. What causes atopic dermatitis. What are atopic dermatitis symptoms and signs. What factors can aggravate atopic dermatitis. What is the treatment for atopic dermatitis. Find a local Dermatologist in your town. Atopic dermatitis facts. Atopic ...
http://rxlist.com/atopic_dermatitis/article.htm
*  Atopic Dermatitis: Get the Facts on This Type of Eczema
... Like Us. Follow Us. About Us. Pill Identifier Search. October 6, 2015. Home. Drugs A-Z. Pill Identifier. Supplements. Slideshows. Images. Symptom Checker. Diseases. Dictionary. Quizzes. home. diseases, conditions and tests a-z list. atopic dermatitis article. font size A A A. Previous. 1 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7 8. 9 10. 11. Next. Atopic Dermatitis cont. Take the Eczema Quiz. Eczema Atopic Dermatitis Slideshow Pictures. Adult Skin Problems Slideshow Pictures. Medical Author: Gary W. Cole, MD, FAAD. Gary W. Cole, MD, FAAD Dr. Cole is board certified in dermatology. He obtained his BA degree in bacteriology, his MA degree in microbiology, and his MD at the University of California, Los Angeles. He trained in dermatology at the University of Oregon, where he completed his residency. View Full Profile. Medical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR. William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he ...
http://rxlist.com/atopic_dermatitis/page8.htm
*  Childhood atopic dermatitis: 2 | Practice | Nursing Times
Childhood atopic dermatitis: 2. Practice. Nursing Times. Skip to main content. Skip to navigation. FAQs. Contact. About. Marketing & Advertising. Events. Group Access. Recruitment. Subscribe. Register. Sign in. By continuing to use the site you agree to our Privacy Cookies policy. Your browser seems to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser. Close. Accept. 'Nurses key to success of new care models'. Steve Ford, news editor. SPEAK OUT SAFELY CAMPAIGN. Search the site. Home. Nursing Practice. Nursing Times Learning. Opinion. Student Nursing Times. Jobs. Subscribe. Your browser is no longer supported For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser. Close. Childhood atopic dermatitis: 2 1 October, 2003. Linda Moffat, RGN, SCM, Cert Health Ed. Sister, Dermatology and Medical Procedure Unit, Cumberland Infirmary, Carlisle, Cumbria ... Part 1 of this Factfile on AD appeared ...
http://nursingtimes.net/childhood-atopic-dermatitis-2/199576.article
*  EpiCeram® | A Unique, Non-steroidal Therapy for Eczema and Atopic Dermatitis Patients
EpiCeram®. A Unique, Non-steroidal Therapy for Eczema and Atopic Dermatitis Patients. Home. For Patients. For Physicians. Coupon Offer. News. Contact Us. Prescribing Information. Home. For Patients. For Physicians. Coupon Offer. News. Contact Us. Prescribing Information. EpiCeram®. A Unique, Non-steroidal Therapy for Eczema and Atopic Dermatitis Patients. EpiCeram® is a leading prescription product that has the ability to help repair and heal the skin barrier through a unique mode-of-action different from other medications and eczema treatments. eczema treatments,EpiCeram,Atopic Dermatitis Treatments. 14468 home,page,page-id-14468,page-template,page-template-full width,page-template-full width-php,ajax fade,page not loaded,boxed,,qode-title-hidden,qode-theme-ver-6.0,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.3.5,vc responsive. EpiCeram ® … a Unique, Non-steroidal Therapy for Eczema and Atopic Dermatitis Patients. Now available in two sizes to fit your eczema treatment needs. About EpiCeram ®. ...
http://epiceram-us.com/
*  Atopic Dermatitis | National Eczema Association
Atopic Dermatitis. Eczema Symptoms of Eczema. Types of Eczema. Child Eczema. Living with Eczema Personal Experiences. Tools for School. Get Involved. Get Involved Forums for Adults. NEA Webcasts. Donate Now. Eczema Advocacy. Itching for a Cure Walk. October is Eczema Awareness Month. NEA Patient Conference. Eczema Products About NEA Seal of Acceptance ™. Glossary of Skin Care Terms. DONATE Ways to Donate. Eczema Symptoms of Eczema. Types of Eczema. Child Eczema. Living with Eczema Personal Experiences. Tools for School. Get Involved. Get Involved Forums for Adults. NEA Webcasts. Donate Now. Eczema Advocacy. Itching for a Cure Walk. October is Eczema Awareness Month. NEA Patient Conference. Eczema Products About NEA Seal of Acceptance ™. Glossary of Skin Care Terms. DONATE Ways to Donate. Atopic Dermatitis. Atopic Dermatitis Types of Eczema Atopic Dermatitis What is Atopic Dermatitis. Is Eczema the Same as AD. What To Do About Dry Skin. Atopic Dermatitis This image ...
https://nationaleczema.org/eczema/types-of-eczema/atopic-dermatitis-2/
*  Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)
Atopic Dermatitis Eczema. Atopic Dermatitis Eczema. Topic Overview. Things that may make atopic dermatitis worse include:. Skin infection. Getting medical treatment early may keep your symptoms from getting worse. Or you may get ultraviolet UV light treatment at a clinic or doctor's office. Getting treatment:. When should I call my doctor. How can I take care of my skin. Up to 40% of children with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis also have some type of food allergy. How bad your symptoms are depends on how large an area of skin is affected, how much you scratch the rash, and whether the rash gets infected. Atopic dermatitis causes repeated attacks of itching and rash that can become quite severe. There are crusting or oozing sores, severe scratch marks, widespread rash, severe discoloration of the skin, or a fever that is accompanied by a rash. For rashes that don't get better with medicines or moisturizers, treatment may include:. What to think about Counseling may be ...
http://ghc.org/kbase/topic.jhtml?docId=hw216104&secId=hw216186
*  Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)
Atopic Dermatitis Eczema. Atopic Dermatitis Eczema. Topic Overview. Things that may make atopic dermatitis worse include:. Skin infection. Getting medical treatment early may keep your symptoms from getting worse. Or you may get ultraviolet UV light treatment at a clinic or doctor's office. Getting treatment:. When should I call my doctor. How can I take care of my skin. Up to 40% of children with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis also have some type of food allergy. How bad your symptoms are depends on how large an area of skin is affected, how much you scratch the rash, and whether the rash gets infected. Atopic dermatitis causes repeated attacks of itching and rash that can become quite severe. There are crusting or oozing sores, severe scratch marks, widespread rash, severe discoloration of the skin, or a fever that is accompanied by a rash. For rashes that don't get better with medicines or moisturizers, treatment may include:. What to think about Counseling may be ...
http://ghc.org/kbase/topic.jhtml?docId=hw216104&secId=hw216300
*  Research Reveals New Treatments for Atopic Dermatitis
Skin Science > Physiology Research Reveals New Treatments for Atopic Dermatitis. Topical corticosteroids Used to diminish the skin s inflammatory response, topical corticosteroids are a mainstay in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Eichenfield noted that some patients have expressed concern about the cost of treatments. Topical calcineurin inhibitors Another category of atopic dermatitis therapies used to suppress inflammation of the skin is topical calcineurin inhibitors, which includes the FDA-approved tacrolimus ointment and pimecrolimus cream. Recently, several new studies have examined whether the intermittent use of topical calcineurin inhibitors can effectively control atopic dermatitis. In patients whose atopic dermatitis was initially controlled with the application of topical corticosteroids or tacrolimus ointment, applying topical calcineurin inhibitors intermittently was effective in maintaining control of flare-ups. Studies have shown that topical calcineurin ...
http://skininc.com/skinscience/physiology/41746247.html?page=4
*  MayoClinic.com Health Library - Atopic dermatitis (eczema)
MayoClinic.com Health Library - Atopic dermatitis eczema. myHealth eLink Request an Appointment. Riverside Regional Medical Center Riverside Walter Reed Hospital Riverside Tappahannock Hospital Riverside Shore Memorial Hospital Riverside Doctors' Hospital Specialty Hospitals. Riverside Rehabilitation Institute Hampton Roads Specialty Hospital Riverside Behavioral Health Center. Log In to myHealth eLink. About myHealth eLink Find a Doctor Request an Appointment Schedule a Mammogram. riversideonline.com Home » MayoClinic.com Health Library » Disease & Conditions. Atopic dermatitis eczema. Definition Symptoms Causes Complications Preparing for your appointment Tests and diagnosis Treatments and drugs Lifestyle and home remedies Alternative medicine Prevention Definition. Atopic dermatitis eczema is an itchy inflammation of your skin. Atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis. Next: Symptoms. Symptoms. Signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis eczema include:. Itching may be ...
http://riversideonline.com/health_reference/Disease-Conditions/DS00986.cfm
*  Atopic dermatitis (eczema) - Mayo Clinic
Atopic dermatitis eczema - Mayo Clinic. Diseases and Conditions Atopic dermatitis eczema. By Mayo Clinic Staff. Atopic dermatitis eczema is a condition that makes your skin red and itchy. But treatments and self-care measures can relieve itching and prevent new outbreaks. See your doctor if your atopic dermatitis symptoms distract you from your daily routines or prevent you from sleeping. Atopic dermatitis eczema signs and symptoms vary widely from person to person and include:. Factors that worsen atopic dermatitis. Most people with atopic dermatitis also have Staphylococcus aureus bacteria on their skin. This in turn may worsen symptoms, particularly in young children. Factors that can worsen atopic dermatitis signs and symptoms include:. Take your child to the doctor if you notice these signs and symptoms in your child or if you suspect your child has atopic dermatitis. Risk factors for children include:. Living in urban areas Being ...
http://mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/eczema/basics/definition/con-20032073?footprints=mine&p=1
*  Clinical correlations of recent developments in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis
Probably half of the children with atopic dermatitis develop some other form of atopic disease later in life. INTRODUCTION In the last 20 to 30 years the prevalence of atopic dermatitis AD has increased dramatically 1-5 attracting the attention of public health, immunology, allergy and dermatology communities. This temporal progression of atopic symptoms from atopic dermatitis to allergic sensitization of the skin, food allergy, hay fever allergic rhinitis and later airway hyperresponsivness and airway inflammation or asthma, has been named the "allergic march". 39 The exact role however of allergen exposure in atopic dermatitis is controversial. Approximately 40% of children with moderate to severe AD have a food allergy and ingestion of the offending food will exacerbate AD. 45 These data have provided compelling arguments for food allergy involvement in AD. 74 In addition to the Th1 and Th2 subset of T cells, defects in T regulatory cells have been implicated in the development ...
http://scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0365-05962008000100009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en
*  Systemic treatment of severe atopic eczema: a systematic review
... Schmitt J, Schakel K, Schmitt N, Meurer M. CRD summary This review concluded that cyclosporin is consistently effective in treating atopic eczema refractory to topical treatment, and is recommended as the first option for these patients. There was insufficient evidence available for other potential treatments. This was a well-conducted review and the conclusions are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To determine which systemic immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory agent to use as first- and second-choice treatment for patients with severe atopic eczema. Searching MEDLINE was searched to 2005; the search terms were reported. The Cochran Skin Group’s Specialised Register, the Cochrane CENTRAL Register and the bibliographies of review articles were also searched. Only full-text articles were included. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Prospective clinical trials were eligible for inclusion. Case reports or series with fewer than 5 patients were excluded. Specific ...
http://crd.york.ac.uk/crdweb/ShowRecord.asp?LinkFrom=OAI&ID=12007001278
*  Cream For The Treatment Of Atopic Dermatitis | eBay
Cream For The Treatment Of Atopic Dermatitis. Refine your search for Cream For The Treatment Of Atopic Dermatitis. Delivery options see all Delivery options Free P&P. Sold listings. Cream For The Treatment Of Atopic Dermatitis 0 listings. You're now following Cream For The Treatment Of Atopic Dermatitis in your eBay feed. Postage to 07095. Items in search results More items related to Cream For The Treatment Of Atopic Dermatitis. Postage not specified. 68 sold. + £3.00 postage. Pierre Fabre Dexeryl Cream Xerosis Atopic Dermatitis Ichthyosis Skin Dryness UK £10.99. + £15.99 postage. Dexeryl Cream 50g Xerosis Atopic Dermatitis Moisturize Hydrates Dry Itchy Skin £3.99. + £4.99 postage. Free Postage. Dermalex Repair Skin Treatment Cream For Eczema - 30g Steroid Free £8.30. Postage not specified. Urea Cream 30% Treatment Eczema Psoriasis Atopic Dermatitis Dry Skin Free PP £8.07 Was: £9.49 + £4.99 postage. 21 sold. + £3.99 postage. 141 sold. Eczema, ...
http://ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_nkw=Cream For The Treatment Of Atopic Dermatitis
*  Evaluation of Itch by Using NC/NgaTnd Mice: A Model of Human Atopic Dermatitis
... Hindawi Publishing Corporation. Home. Journals. About Us. BioMed Research International. Impact Factor 1.579. About this Journal. Submit a Manuscript. Table of Contents Journal Menu. About this Journal ·. Abstracting and Indexing ·. Advance Access ·. Aims and Scope ·. Annual Issues ·. Article Processing Charges ·. Articles in Press ·. Author Guidelines ·. Bibliographic Information ·. Citations to this Journal ·. Contact Information ·. Editorial Board ·. Editorial Workflow ·. Free eTOC Alerts ·. Publication Ethics ·. Reviewers Acknowledgment ·. Submit a Manuscript ·. Subscription Information ·. Table of Contents. Open Special Issues ·. Published Special Issues ·. Special Issue Guidelines. Abstract. Full-Text PDF. Full-Text HTML. Full-Text ePUB. Full-Text XML. Linked References. Citations to this Article. How to Cite this Article. Complete Special Issue. Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology Volume 2011 ...
http://hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2011/790436/
*  Sarah L Chamlin
2009 The psychosocial burden of childhood atopic dermatitis Sarah L Chamlin Department of Pediatrics and Division of Pediatric Dermatology, Children s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL 60614, USA Dermatol Ther 19:104-7. 2010 Development of the Childhood Atopic Dermatitis Impact Scale: initial validation of a quality-of-life measure for young children with atopic dermatitis and their families Sarah L Chamlin Division of Pediatric Dermatology, Children s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA J Invest Dermatol 125:1106-11. 2005 Effects of atopic dermatitis on young American children and their families Sarah L Chamlin Division of Pediatric Dermatology, Children s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, USA Pediatrics 114:607-11. 2004 The socioeconomic impact of atopic dermatitis in the United States: a systematic review Anthony J Mancini Division of Pediatric Dermatology, Children s Memorial Hospital, and Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of ...
http://labome.org/expert/usa/childrens/chamlin/sarah-l-chamlin-305545.html
*  Atopic dermatitis (eczema) Alternative medicine - Mayo Clinic
Atopic dermatitis eczema Alternative medicine - Mayo Clinic. Diseases and Conditions Atopic dermatitis eczema. By Mayo Clinic Staff. Atopic dermatitis eczema is a condition that makes your skin red and itchy. But treatments and self-care measures can relieve itching and prevent new outbreaks. Atopic dermatitis eczema signs and symptoms vary widely from person to person and include:. Factors that worsen atopic dermatitis. This in turn may worsen symptoms, particularly in young children. Factors that can worsen atopic dermatitis signs and symptoms include:. Take your child to the doctor if you notice these signs and symptoms in your child or if you suspect your child has atopic dermatitis. Risk factors for children include:. Living in urban areas Being African-American Having parents with a high level of education Attending child care Having attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ADHD Complications of atopic dermatitis eczema include:. If regular ...
http://mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/eczema/basics/alternative-medicine/con-20032073?p=1
*  SCORAD (scoring atopic dermatitis). DermNet NZ
SCORAD scoring atopic dermatitis. DermNet NZ. DermNet NZ. Facts about the skin from DermNet New Zealand Trust. About us Contact us Bookstore Donate Advertise. Eczema, dermatitis and allergies. Atopic dermatitis. SCORAD SCORAD is a clinical tool used to assess the extent and severity of eczema SCOR ing A topic D ermatitis. Dermatologists may use this tool before and after treatment to determine whether the treatment has been effective. Area To determine extent, the sites affected by eczema are shaded on a drawing of a body. The rule of 9 is used to calculate the affected area A as a percentage of the whole body. The score for each area is added up. The total area is 'A', which has a possible maximum of 100%. Intensity A representative area of eczema is selected. Redness. Swelling. Skin thickening lichenification. Dryness this is assessed in an area where there is no inflammation. The intensity scores are added together to give 'B' maximum 18. Redness: 1; Swelling: 0; Oozing: 0; ...
http://dermnetnz.org/dermatitis/scorad.html
*  New Risk Variant For Atopic Dermatitis Identified - Biology Online
... New Risk Variant For Atopic Dermatitis Identified New Risk Variant For Atopic Dermatitis Identified. April 14, 2009 — Scientists of the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine MDC Berlin-Buch and Charité – University Medical School, Berlin, Germany, in collaboration with researchers from the Klinikum rechts der Isar of Technical University Munich and Christian Albrecht University, Kiel, have identified a gene variant on chromosome 11 that is associated with an increased risk of atopic dermatitis. In a large genome-wide association study the researchers scanned the genomes of more than 9600 participants from Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic. The pediatrician-researcher and her collaborators hope the study will lead to a new approach to targeted therapy for this chronic skin disorder. Along with hay fever and asthma, atopic dermatitis is one of the most common allergic disorders. Atopic dermatitis is typically the first clinical manifestation of allergic ...
http://biology-online.org/articles/risk-variant-atopic-dermatitis-identified.html
*  Eczema - Atopic Dermatitis | Eczema Treatment & Symptoms
Eczema - Atopic Dermatitis. Eczema Treatment Symptoms. Search for:. Patient Portal Login. New Patients. Patients. Patient Portal Login. Programs & Services. Search All Programs Services Tests We Offer. Clinical Trials. Pediatrics - National Jewish Health for Kids. Find a Doctor. Departments Divisions. Health Information. Healthy Lifestyle. Ways to Help. Make a Donation. Departments Divisions. Connect With Us. Eczema Atopic Dermatitis Do I Have Eczema. What Causes Eczema. Eczema Symptoms. Atopic is a term used to describe allergic conditions such as asthma and hay fever. If you ever had atopic dermatitis, you may have trouble with one or more of these: Dry, sensitive skin Hand dermatitis Skin infections. Eczema Videos Atopic Dermatitis Watch our videos on eczema - in English and Spanish - by viewing our atopic dermatitis playlist on YouTube. If you answer yes to any of these questions, talk with your health care provider about eczema atopic dermatitis. Be sure ...
http://nationaljewish.org/healthinfo/conditions/allergy/types/eczema/
*  American Academy of Dermatology issues new guidelines of care for the diagnosis of atopic dermatitis
... Excellence in Dermatology Excellence in Dermatologic Surgery Excellence in Medical Dermatology Excellence in Dermatopathology. American Academy of Dermatology issues new guidelines of care for the diagnosis of atopic dermatitis. Published online in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, the Academy’s first of four sections in the guidelines of care for atopic dermatitis focuses on methods for diagnosing and monitoring the disease. The guidelines also discuss measurements for disease severity and quality of life, as well as associated conditions that commonly affect patients with atopic dermatitis. According to current estimates, up to 25 percent of children and 2 to 3 percent of adults have atopic dermatitis. These guidelines provide criteria for accurately diagnosing atopic dermatitis that differentiate it from other conditions with similar characteristics.” Key recommendations Based on a comprehensive review of available data for diagnosing and managing ...
https://aad.org/stories-and-news/news-releases/american-academy-of-dermatology-issues-new-guidelines-of-care-for-the-diagnosis-of-atopic-dermatitis
*  Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema) Program
Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis Eczema Program. Pediatrics - National Jewish Health for Kids. Find a Doctor. Any one of the following is a good reason to see the National Jewish Health for Kids atopic dermatitis team: Itching, dry skin or eczema getting worse despite current therapy Atopic dermatitis worsens after being around certain things in the environment or eating certain foods Atopic dermatitis interferes with ability to sleep or perform daily activities Concerns about medications used to treat atopic dermatitis Oral or systemic medications are causing side effects, especially oral steroids Recurring infections requiring antibiotic therapy, especially due to Staphylococcus aureus or herpes virus Your regular healthcare provider refers you to an expert for evaluation You want to participate in research studies to learn more about the disease and new treatments. A Dedicated Team The National Jewish Health for Kids atopic dermatitis team brings together physicians, ...
http://nationaljewish.org/programs/pediatric/atopic-dermatitis
*  Allergen-specific immunotherapy for canine atopic dermatitis: Making it work
... >> Mobile Site Home of dvm360 magazine Veterinary Medicine Veterinary Economics Firstline The CVC Group. CVC. Medicine. Allergen-specific immunotherapy for canine atopic dermatitis: Making it work You don't hesitate to recommend home-administered insulin injections in diabetic patients, so why not do the same for immunotherapy in atopic dogs. ALLERGEN-SPECIFIC immunotherapy is the mainstay of therapy for canine atopic dermatitis. Allergen-specific immunotherapy's efficacy in dogs has been demonstrated in a blinded placebo-controlled study that revealed greater than 50% improvement in 59% of allergen-treated dogs and in only 21% of placebo-treated dogs. One prospective study evaluated allergen-specific immunotherapy in atopic dogs with house dust mite allergy that were treated with house dust mite allergen. When combined with other nonsteroidal treatments antihistamines, fatty acids, and shampooing, allergen-specific immunotherapy was effective in more than 75% of the atopic dogs treated, ...
http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/allergen-specific-immunotherapy-canine-atopic-dermatitis-making-it-work
*  Atopic dermatitis
... {{Infobox disease Name = Atopic dermatitis Image = Atopy2010.JPG Caption = Atopic dermatitis of the inside crease of the elbow. ICD9 = 'Atopic dermatitis' 'AD', also known as 'atopic eczema', is a type of inflammation of the skin dermatitis. The diagnosis is typically based on the signs and symptoms. Other diseases that need to be excluded before making a diagnosis include contact dermatitis, psoriasis, and seborrheic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis is sometimes called eczema, a term that also refers to a larger group of skin conditions. 5 Signs and symptoms Cause Diagnosis Treatments Epidemiology See also References External links. Signs and symptoms. In 2006 it was discovered that mutation s in the gene for the production of filaggrin strongly increased the risk for developing atopic dermatitis. People who have these mutations often have dry skin. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema. ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atopic_dermatitis
*  First genetic mutations linked to atopic dermatitis identified in African-American children
... November 11, 2013 First genetic mutations linked to atopic dermatitis identified in African-American children November 11, 2013 Two specific genetic variations in people of African descent are responsible for persistent atopic dermatitis AD, an itchy, inflammatory form of the skin disorder eczema. A new report by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that loss-of-function mutations to Filaggrin-2 FLG2, a gene that creates a protein responsible for retaining moisture and protecting the skin from environmental irritants, were associated with atopic dermatitis in African American children. The study, the first report to deduce the mechanism responsible for the persistent form of the condition in African American children, was published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Nearly half of people with atopic dermatitis in the United States are African-American children. Explore further: Filaggrin mutations up risk of ...
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-11-genetic-mutations-linked-atopic-dermatitis.html
*  Atopic Dermatitis Photos | AAAAI
Atopic Dermatitis Photos. AAAAI. Español. Donate. Journals. Annual Meeting. Find an Allergist / Immunologist. Member Login. Forgot your password. Advocacy Pollen Counts AAAAI Store Ask the Expert Latest Research. Conditions Treatments. Allergies. Asthma. Primary Immunodeficiency Disease. Related Conditions. Drug Guide. Conditions Dictionary. Virtual Allergist. Just for Kids. Library. Videos. Professional Education Training. Careers in A/I. Continuing Education Center. Fellows-in-Training. Grants Awards. Program Directors. Practice Resources. ASTHMA IQ. Consultation and Referral Guidelines. Practice Financial Survey. Practice Tools. Running a Practice. Statements and Practice Parameters. My Membership. AAAAI Constituency Groups. Direct Access Links. Governance. Manage Your Account. Member Magazines. Membership Directory. Staff Contacts. About the AAAAI. Allergist / Immunologists: Specialized Skills. Career Connections Center. Code of Ethics. Disclosure Policy. History. Membership. Newsroom. ...
http://aaaai.org/about-the-aaaai/newsroom/media-gallery/photos---graphics--atopic-dermatitis.aspx
*  PharmaPoint: Atopic Dermatitis - UK Drug Forecast and Market Analysis to 2022 | Jan 14, 2014 - SBWir
PharmaPoint: Atopic Dermatitis - UK Drug Forecast and Market Analysis to 2022. PharmaPoint: Atopic Dermatitis - UK Drug Forecast and Market Analysis to 2022. Naperville, IL -- SBWIRE -- 01/14/2014 -- Reportstack, provider of premium market research reports announces the addition of PharmaPoint: Atopic Dermatitis - UK Drug Forecast and Market Analysis to 2022 market report to its offering PharmaPoint: Atopic Dermatitis - UK Drug Forecast and Market Analysis to 2022. Although the past decade has seen the atopic dermatitis market remain relatively unchanged and a saturated, highly genericized arena, the coming decade could see the launch of the first biologic, which will set a precedent and pave the way for others to follow suit. - Overview of Atopic Dermatitis including epidemiology, etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, pathology and treatment guidelines as well as an overview on the competitive landscape. - Sales forecast for the top drugs in the UK from 2012-2022. - ...
http://sbwire.com/press-releases/pharmapoint-atopic-dermatitis-uk-drug-forecast-and-market-analysis-to-2022-433858.htm
*  Prevalence of suicidal ideation in patients with atopic dermatitis.
... BioMedSearch. Advanced Search. Tools. Search Tutorial. Login. Create Free Account. Document Detail. Prevalence of suicidal ideation in patients with atopic dermatitis. MedLine Citation:. PMID: 16676633 Owner: NLM Status: MEDLINE. Abstract/OtherAbstract:. The prevalence of suicidal ideation in patients with mild, moderate, and severe atopic dermatitis between the age of 15 to 49 years were 0.21%, 6%, and 19.6%, respectively. In addition, the prevalence of homicide-suicidal ideation in mothers or fathers of patients aged 0-14 years with mild, moderate, and severe atopic dermatitis were 0.11%, 0.35%, and 3.28%, respectively. These results indicate that patients with atopic dermatitis or even parents of patients with atopic dermatitis have high prevalence of suicidal ideation. Hajime Kimata. Related Documents :. 7217513 - Assessment of host resistance in critically ill surgical patients by the response to re... 122643 - Results of miconazole therapy in twenty-eight ...
http://biomedsearch.com/nih/Prevalence-suicidal-ideation-in-patients/16676633.html
*  Atopic Dermatitis Center | Overview | Boston Children's Hospital
Atopic Dermatitis Center. Overview | Boston Children's Hospital. bostonchildrens.org. International Resources. Patient Resources. Patient Resources. Go to patient resources. Your Healthcare Team. Ranked #1 Children's Hospital by U.S. Learn more. Clinician Resources. Clinician Resources. Go to Clinician Resources. Centers + Services. Centers + Services. Go to Center & Services. National Centers. Pediatric Transplant Center. Programs & Services. Pediatric Hand Transplant Program. Learn more. Research + Innovation. Research + Innovation. Innovation. Clinical. Innovation insider is a semi-monthly e-newsletter analyzes innovations at Boston Children’s, other academic medical centers and from industry. Read the latest blog by a Boston Children's doctor, clinician or staff member. The Atopic Dermatitis Center at Boston Children's Hospital helps children and adolescents cope with severe atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema. Physicians often use the terms the terms eczema and atopic ...
http://childrenshospital.org/centers-and-services/programs/a-_-e/atopic-dermatitis-center-program
*  Phototherapy for Atopic Dermatitis - Concord Hospital - Concord, NH
... Phototherapy for Atopic Dermatitis. Phototherapy for Atopic Dermatitis. Treatment Overview Phototherapy is the supervised use of ultraviolet UV light to treat skin conditions, including atopic dermatitis. Ultraviolet B UVB, ultraviolet A UVA, or a combination of UVB and UVA may be used during therapy. What To Expect After Treatment As your skin recovers from treatment, it should be checked frequently at least once or twice a year for signs of skin damage or skin cancer. How Well It Works Phototherapy with ultraviolet UV light can be an effective treatment for severe atopic dermatitis. Combined UVA and UVB light have a more beneficial effect than UVA or UVB light alone. Risks Risks related to phototherapy include: Skin cancer and cancer. Exposure to UV light may result in skin cancer. Skin damage. Exposure to UV light may lead to sunburn and skin damage. UVB treatment requires little time from seconds to minutes. UVA treatment is more time-consuming typically 20 minutes for a ...
http://concordhospital.org/wellness-resources/health-library/healthwise-document-viewer/?id=hw215920
*  FPIN's Clinical Inquiries: Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Atopic Dermatitis - American
... Family Physician. Advertisement. Previous article Next article. Apr 15, 2012 Issue. FPIN's Clinical Inquiries Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Atopic Dermatitis. FREE PREVIEW. AAFP members and paid subscribers: Log in to get free access. All others: Purchase online access. FREE PREVIEW. Purchase online access to read the full version of this article. SIMONE NORRIS, MD, and DAVID D. ORTIZ, MD, CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Family Medicine Residency Program, San Antonio, Texas ELAINE SULLO, MLS, MAEd, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia Am Fam Physician. 2012 Apr 15;85 8 :817-821. Clinical Question What complementary and alternative therapies are effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Evidence-Based Answer Evening primrose oil may be effective for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Strength of Recommendation : B, based on one randomized controlled trial. Homeopathy may be as good as conventional therapy for eczema. Probiotics SOR: ...
http://aafp.org/afp/2012/0415/p817.html
*  Atopic Dermatitis
... Home : Brands : Atopic Dermatitis. Atopic Dermatitis. Itchy, irritated skin is no fun to have. One common cause of this frustrating problem is a condition called atopic dermatitis, also referred to as eczema. This is a skin problem that usually starts early in life and may come and go over a lifetime. It can cause a variety of unpleasant signs and symptoms including cracked, scaling skin, bumps and severe itching. It can affect almost any area of the body, although the backs of the elbows and knees, hands, feet and neck are some of the most frequent areas affected. Even the face can be involved. Sometimes the cracks and fissures can become infected with bacteria or the areas scar from constant scratching. That’s why it’s important to treat the atopic dermatitis. What Causes It. No one knows the exact cause of this skin condition, but the immune system is almost certainly involved since many people with it also have allergies, hay fever or asthma. There is a genetic component ...
http://skinstore.com/atopic-dermatitis.aspx?avs=Concern|Eczema&as=Ships Free (Descending)&ppp=48&c=True
*  Atopic Dermatitis
... Home : Brands : Atopic Dermatitis. Atopic Dermatitis. Itchy, irritated skin is no fun to have. One common cause of this frustrating problem is a condition called atopic dermatitis, also referred to as eczema. This is a skin problem that usually starts early in life and may come and go over a lifetime. It can cause a variety of unpleasant signs and symptoms including cracked, scaling skin, bumps and severe itching. It can affect almost any area of the body, although the backs of the elbows and knees, hands, feet and neck are some of the most frequent areas affected. Even the face can be involved. Sometimes the cracks and fissures can become infected with bacteria or the areas scar from constant scratching. That’s why it’s important to treat the atopic dermatitis. What Causes It. No one knows the exact cause of this skin condition, but the immune system is almost certainly involved since many people with it also have allergies, hay fever or asthma. There is a genetic component ...
http://skinstore.com/atopic-dermatitis.aspx?avs=Skin Type|Dry&avs=Concern|Eczema&as=Ships Free (Descending)
*  Atopic Dermatitis
... Home : Brands : Atopic Dermatitis. Atopic Dermatitis. Itchy, irritated skin is no fun to have. One common cause of this frustrating problem is a condition called atopic dermatitis, also referred to as eczema. This is a skin problem that usually starts early in life and may come and go over a lifetime. It can cause a variety of unpleasant signs and symptoms including cracked, scaling skin, bumps and severe itching. It can affect almost any area of the body, although the backs of the elbows and knees, hands, feet and neck are some of the most frequent areas affected. Even the face can be involved. Sometimes the cracks and fissures can become infected with bacteria or the areas scar from constant scratching. That’s why it’s important to treat the atopic dermatitis. What Causes It. No one knows the exact cause of this skin condition, but the immune system is almost certainly involved since many people with it also have allergies, hay fever or asthma. There is a genetic component ...
http://skinstore.com/atopic-dermatitis.aspx?avs=Who Is It For|Baby/Child&avs=Concern|Eczema&as=Special (Descending)
*  Pilot Study of Ustekinumab for Subjects With Chronic Atopic Dermatitis - No Study Results Posted - C
... linicalTrials.gov. Skip to Main Content. A service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health Example: "Heart attack" AND "Los Angeles" Search for studies:. Advanced Search. Help. Studies by Topic. Glossary. Find Studies. Basic Search. Advanced Search. See Studies by Topic. See Studies on Map. How to Search. How to Use Search Results. How to Find Results of Studies. How to Read a Study Record. About Clinical Studies. Learn About Clinical Studies. Other Sites About Clinical Studies. Glossary of Common Site Terms. Submit Studies. Why Should I Register and Submit Results. FDAAA 801 Requirements. How to Apply for an Account. How to Register Your Study. How to Edit Your Study Record. How to Submit Your Results. Frequently Asked Questions. Support Materials. Training Materials. Resources. Selected Publications. Clinical Alerts and Advisories. RSS Feeds. Trends, Charts, and Maps. Downloading Content for Analysis. About This Site. ClinicalTrials.gov Background. About the Results Database. History, Policies, and ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT01806662?view=record
*  Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)-Topic Overview
Atopic Dermatitis Eczema -Topic Overview. Symptoms. Health A-Z. Common Conditions. Skin Problems. Featured Topics. See what your medical symptoms could mean, and learn about possible conditions. Communities: Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life. WebMD Pain Coach. Track your pain levels, triggers, and treatments. Find Information About:. Taking Medications During Pregnancy. WebMD My Medicine Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more. Drug News. Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox. FDA Approves Diet Pill Belviq. WebMD Mobile Drug Information App. Living Healthy. Featured Content. Living Healthy Centers. Healthy Beauty. Featured Topics. WebMD Allergy App for iPhone. Family Pregnancy. Featured Content. Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox. Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life. The cause of atopic ...
http://webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/eczema/tc/atopic-dermatitis-topic-overview
*  Low-dose recombinant canine interferon-gamma for treatment of canine atopic dermatitis: an open rand
... omized comparative trial of two doses. Drugs By Name By Condition By Category Most Searched Ratings/Reviews Adverse Events Actives. Low-dose recombinant canine interferon-gamma for treatment of canine atopic dermatitis: an open randomized comparative trial of two doses. yasu9244-vet@au8.mopera.ne.jp Publication date source: 2010-02, Vet Dermatol., 21 1 :42-9. Gov't The purpose of this study was to investigate the minimum effective dose of recombinant canine interferon-gamma rCaIFN-gamma for the treatment of dogs with atopic dermatitis AD. Thirty-four dogs with AD from 17 animal hospitals in Japan were administered half or one-fifth of the approved rCaIFN-gamma dose of 10 000 units/kg, three times a week for 4 weeks, followed by once weekly for an additional 4 weeks. Pruritus, excoriation, erythema and alopecia were evaluated and scored by the investigators on weeks 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12. The efficacy rate number of excellent cases + number of good cases/total number of cases at week 8 in the ...
http://druglib.com/abstract/ya/yasukawa-k_vet-dermatol_20100200.html
*  Evaluation of canine antimicrobial peptides in infected and noninfected chronic atopic skin.
... MedLine Citation:. Background - Antimicrobial peptides AMPs are small immunomodulatory peptides produced by epithelial and immune cells. Recently, increased cutaneous expression of AMPs was reported in atopic humans and in beagles with experimentally induced atopy. Hypothesis/Objectives - Our goal was to analyse mRNA expression and protein levels of canine c BD1-like, cBD2-like/122, cBD3-like, cBD103 and cCath in healthy and naturally affected atopic dogs, with and without active skin infection, along with their distribution in the epidermis using indirect immunofluorescence. Animals - Skin biopsies were taken from 14 healthy and 11 atopic privately owned dogs. Methods - The mRNA levels of cBD1-like, cBD2-like/122, cBD3-like, cBD103 and cCath were quantified using quantitative real-time PCR. The protein levels of cBD3-like and cCath were analysed by relative competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, while the distributions of cBD2-like/122, cBD3-like and cCath were detected by indirect ...
http://biomedsearch.com/nih/Evaluation-canine-antimicrobial-peptides-in/23331678.html
*  New Tool to Self-Assess Severity in Atopic Dermatitis | Modern medicine
New Tool to Self-Assess Severity in Atopic Dermatitis. Contemporary ObGyn Contemporary Pediatrics Cosmetic Surgery Times Dermatology Times Drug Topics Formulary Watch Managed Healthcare Executive Medical Economics Ophthalmology Times Ophthalmology Times Europe Optometry Times Urology Times. Practice Management Health Law Policy Personal Finance Healthcare IT E-Books Practice Management Whitepapers Webinars. Log in to save to my locker New Tool to Self-Assess Severity in Atopic Dermatitis Patient-Oriented SCORing Atopic Dermatitis index as good as physicians' index April 08, 2011. FRIDAY, April 8 HealthDay News -- The Patient-Oriented SCORing Atopic Dermatitis PO-SCORAD index correlates well with SCORAD, which is used internationally by physicians to validate atopic dermatitis AD severity, and can be used by patients to self-assess their AD severity, according to a study published online March 17 in Allergy. Jean-Francois Stalder, M.D., from the Nantes University Hospital in ...
http://modernmedicine.com/modern-medicine/news/modernmedicine/modern-medicine-news/new-tool-self-assess-severity-atopic-dermat
*  "Eczema Care": Allergies Community - Support Group
Eczema Care : Allergies Community - Support Group. Allergies. Communities: Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life. Get Started WebMD My Medicine Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more. Living Healthy. WebMD Health Experts and Community. WebMD Communities Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life. Both the involved skin and even the normal skin has abnormal barrier function in patients with atopic dermatitis. This barrier dysfunction can lead to dry, inflamed skin which can make the atopic dermatitis worse. Incorporating routine skin hydration with lotions/emollients is an important part in atopic dermatitis skin care. Share this: Eczema Care Emerging research has shown that skin barrier dysfunction plays a central role in atopic dermatitis. Both the involved skin and even the normal skin has abnormal barrier function in patients with atopic ...
http://forums.webmd.com/3/allergies-exchange/tip/3/1
*  Atopic Dermatitis Picture from UI Dermatology (Hardin MD / uIowa.edu)
atopic dermatitis picture from ui dermatology hardin md uiowa edu atopic dermatitis picture from ui dermatology return to atopic dermatitis pictures from uiowa edu hardin md atopic dermatitis many more pictures atop derm atopic derm atopic derm atopic derm atopic derm atopic derm atopic derm atopy dennie s line atopic dermatitis is associated with impetigo in atopic derm picture text from tom ray university of iowa department of dermatology for more information see medical pictures from uiowa edu ui dermatology tom ray picture used by permission from tom ray hardin library for the health sciences university of iowa please send comments to hardin webmaster uiowa edu the url for this page is http hardinmd lib uiowa edu ui tray dermatitisatopic html last updated thursday dec
http://hardinmd.lib.uiowa.edu/ui/tray/dermatitisatopic1.html
*  No evidence for association between the −112G/A polymorphism of UGRP1 and childhood atopic asthma
No evidence for association between the 112G/A polymorphism of UGRP1 and childhood atopic asthma - Jian - 2003 - Clinical Experimental Allergy - Wiley Online Library. Our site uses cookies to improve your experience. You can find out more about our use of cookies in About Cookies, including instructions on how to turn off cookies if you wish to do so. By continuing to browse this site you agree to us using cookies as described in About Cookies. Remove maintenance message. Skip to main content. Log in / Register. Advertisement. Go to old article view. Get access. Advertisement. Clinical Experimental Allergy Explore this journal. Previous article in issue: Fluticasone propionate and mometasone furoate have equivalent transcriptional potencies. Previous article in issue: Fluticasone propionate and mometasone furoate have equivalent transcriptional potencies Next article in issue: Proliferation and inflammation in bronchial epithelium after allergen in atopic asthmatics. Next article in issue: Proliferation and ...
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1365-2222.2003.01703.x/full?wol1URL=/doi/10.1046/j.1365-2222.2003.01703.x/full®ionCode=US-VA&identityKey=08b95bcf-1ac3-4b3a-b535-1578ba62681d
*  SPINK5: A gene for atopic dermatitis and asthma - Moffatt - 2004 - Clinical & Experimental Allergy
SPINK5: A gene for atopic dermatitis and asthma - Moffatt - 2004 - Clinical Experimental Allergy - Wiley Online Library. SPINK5 : A gene for atopic dermatitis and asthma Authors M. Publication History Issue published online: 9 March 2004 Article first published online: 9 March 2004. Citing Literature Number of times cited : 21 1 Tim Nuttall , Advances in Veterinary Dermatology, 2013 , 10 CrossRef 2 Clive Robinson , Jihui Zhang , Gary K Newton , Trevor R Perrior , Nonhuman targets in allergic lung conditions, Future Medicinal Chemistry , 2013 , 5 , 2, 147 CrossRef 3 Tim Nuttall , The genomics revolution: will canine atopic dermatitis be predictable and preventable?, Veterinary Dermatology , 2013 , 24 , 1, 10 Wiley Online Library 4 Tim Nuttall , Veterinary Allergy, 2013 , 32 CrossRef 5 Lianghua Bin , Byung E Kim , Clifton F Hall , Sonia M Leach , Donald Y M Leung , Inhibition of Transcription Factor Specificity Protein 1 Alters the Gene Expression Profile of Keratinocytes Leading to ...
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2222.2004.01915.x/full?wol1URL=/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2222.2004.01915.x/full®ionCode=US-VA&identityKey=6a0f9512-56ec-4c1e-9725-8fdbf7fcc03b
*  .. A-Z Health Topics .. Conditions InDepth: Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) .. References .. Revision In
A-Z Health Topics. Library to Search Health Library Health Day News Consumer Medication Information. Search Method By Title All Text. Language English Spanish. Return to Index by Badash M. Conditions InDepth: Eczema Atopic Dermatitis. Main Page Risk Factors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Screening Reducing Your Risk Talking to Your Doctor Living With Eczema Resource Guide. Eczema is actually just another word for dermatitis, which is an inflammation of the skin. There are many types of dermatitis, but the term eczema has come to be associated with a specific type of dermatitis called atopic dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, noncontagious condition that causes itchy, inflamed skin. Atopic dermatitis eczema most commonly affects the insides of the elbows, the backs of the knees, and the face, but it can affect any area of the body and in rare cases may cover most of the body. Although eczema can develop at any age, it is most common in infants and ...
http://centegra.org/a-z-health-topics/?chunkid=19374&lang=English&db=hlt
*  Eucerin: Atopic skin | Overview
Eucerin: Atopic skin. Overview. . SKIN CONCERNS. Acne prone skin. Face. ABOUT. INDICATIONS. PRODUCT TYPES. Acne prone skin in general. Acne prone skin with medication. Acne prone skin without medication. Sun and sensitive and problematic skin. Cleansing-toning. Covering. Face care. Special treatment. Sun. Acne prone skin in general. Ageing skin. ABOUT. INDICATIONS. PRODUCT TYPES. Age-induced dryness. Ageing skin in general. Loss of density. Loss of volume. Prevention. Sensitive ageing skin. Age spots. Cleansing-toning. Covering. Eye care. Face care. Lip care. Special treatment. Atopic dermatitis. Face. PRODUCT TYPES. Atopic Dermatitis on children's face. Atopic Dermatitis on face in flare-up. Atopic Dermatitis on the face. Body care. Face care. Lip care. Special treatment. Body. PRODUCT TYPES. Atopic Dermatitis on body in flare-up. Atopic Dermatitis on children's body. Atopic Dermatitis on the body. Body care. Deo. Special treatment. Washing. Dry skin. Face. ...
http://int.eucerin.com/skin-concerns/atopic-dermatitis
*  .. Take Control of Atopic Dermatitis .. Written by Susan Chaney
Take Control of Atopic Dermatitis. By Susan Chaney. Posted in: Canine Health, Learn., Right Now. 5 comments. A dog that licks or chews on its feet, rubs its face as if itchy, scratches under its front legs and in the groin area, and licks its anal area excessively may be telling you that it has atopic dermatitis. It starts with a little inflammation, then generalized itching, called “pruritis,” leading to scratching. Next comes hair loss, often followed by a skin infection with bumps. “The immune system is overreacting to something,” says Patrick Hensel, Dr.med.vet., a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Dermatologists and associate professor of dermatology at the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine in Athens. This chronic case of atopic dermatitis shows thickened skin due to continual inflammation. Photo courtesy of Patrick Hensel, Dr.med.vet. Chronic atopic dermatitis is almost always due to an allergy of some kind, and typically begins ...
http://bestinshowdaily.com/blog/take-control-of-atopic-dermatitis/
*  Filaggrin gene defects and risk of developing allergic sensitisation and allergic disorders: syste
... matic review and meta-analysis. Allergic sensitisation Combined filaggrin gene defects were shown to increase the risk of allergic sensitisation, odds ratio 1.57 95% confidence interval: 1.20, 2.07; two case-control study arms and odds ratio 1.91 95% confidence interval: 1.44, 2.54; five family study arms. Atopic eczema/dermatitis Combined filaggrin gene defects increased the risk of atopic dermatitis, odds ratio 4.78 95% confidence interval: 3.31, 6.92; 11 case control study arms and odds ratio 1.99 95% confidence interval: 1.72, 2.31; six family study arms. One cohort study showed that filaggrin gene mutations increased the risk of eczema during the first year of life in a Danish cohort, odds ratio 2.26 95% confidence interval: 1.27, 4.00 and an English cohort, odds ratio 1.95 95% confidence interval: 1.13, 3.36. Allergic rhinitis Combined filaggrin gene defects were shown to increase the risk of allergic rhinitis in participants with atopic dermatitis, odds ratio 2.84 95% ...
http://crd.york.ac.uk/crdweb/ShowRecord.asp?LinkFrom=OAI&ID=12009106506
*  Atopic dermatitis
 Atopic dermatitis. Careers. En Español. Navigation Locations. Doctors Providers. Health, Conditions Treatments. Medical Services. Family Health Manager. Home > Health, Conditions and Treatments > Health library. Health Guide Health Encyclopedia. Atopic dermatitis What is it. Atopic dermatitis der-muh-TI-tis is also called eczema EGG-zih-muh. Eczema is an itchy, red skin rash. You may get eczema after having a cold, flu, or skin infection, such as athlete's foot or a cold sore. Medical Care: There are many creams, including steroid creams, used to treat eczema. While steroid creams are helpful, other health problems may occur with long term use. Ultraviolet light treatments are sometimes used. Herbs and Supplements: Before taking any herbs or supplements, ask your caregiver if it is OK. Talk to your caregiver about how much you should take. The herbs and supplements listed may or may not help treat your condition. Supplements: Fish oils may be helpful for eczema and have been studied in ...
http://allinahealth.org/CCS/doc/Alternative_Medicine/48/20089.htm
*  Just Ask the Expert: When clients decline immunotherapy for atopy
... Published on dvm360.com Home > Just Ask the Expert: When clients decline immunotherapy for atopy Just Ask the Expert: When clients decline immunotherapy for atopy. Spiegel, VMD, MHS, DACVD VETERINARY MEDICINE. What is your treatment of choice for atopy if clients won't perform allergy testing to identify an immunotherapy formulation. Spiegel, VMD, MHS, DACVD. A Serologic or intradermal testing is indicated when a client is interested in immunotherapy to manage atopic dermatitis and is performed to determine which allergens should be incorporated into the immunotherapy formulation. Cyclosporine is an excellent option for managing atopic dermatitis with or without immunotherapy. Atopica Novartis Animal Health is the first oral nonsteroidal treatment approved for treating canine atopic dermatitis and, just recently, feline allergic dermatitis. ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS. Essential fatty acids supplemented daily can be helpful as well. Essential fatty acids can also modulate ...
http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/print/300784?page=full
*  Quality of Life Index for Atopic Dermatitis
... the quality of life index for atopic dermatitis qoliad is a disease specific patient reported outcome which measures the impact that atopic dermatitis ad has on a given patient s quality of life it is a item questionnaire for patients over the age of with a maximum score of and is restricted to yes or no answers higher scores on the qoliad indicate a greater negative influence that the disease has on quality of life development the qoliad was developed in and funded by novartis pharma ag switzerland it was produced in several countries and the content was derived from qualitative interviews with patients in the uk italy and netherlands the initial version of the measure was produced in uk english and it was then translated for the netherlands italy germany france and the us a spanish version was then later developed further tests were implemented to validate the measure and it was administrated to patients in each country to finalize the instrument the institutions involved in the ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality_of_Life_Index_for_Atopic_Dermatitis
*  Atopic Dermatitis News, Research
... Atopic Dermatitis News and Research. Atopic Dermatitis Causes. Atopic Dermatitis Treatments. Regeneron, Sanofi to jointly advance new immuno-oncology treatment options for cancer patients Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. FDA approves Praluent alirocumab Injection for treatment of patients with high LDL cholesterol Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that the U.S. Phase 3 ODYSSEY JAPAN trial of Praluent injection meets primary endpoint Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that the Phase 3 ODYSSEY JAPAN trial of the investigational therapy Praluent® alirocumab Injection met its primary endpoint. Immune Pharmaceuticals begins bertilimumab Phase II clinical trials in Bullous Pemphigoid, Ulcerative Colitis Immune Pharmaceuticals Inc. Tioga Pharmaceuticals announces commencement of asimadoline Phase 2 study for treatment of pruritus Tioga Pharmaceuticals, a clinical stage biotechnology company, today announced the initiation of a Phase 2 ...
http://news-medical.net/?tag=/Atopic-Dermatitis
*  Atopic Dermatitis: Taking Care of Your Skin
... Health Care Services. Atopic Dermatitis: Taking Care of Your Skin. Good skin care is an essential part of controlling the itch and rash of atopic dermatitis. To help prevent a cycle of itching, scratching, and rash, you can:. Keep your skin hydrated, and avoid dry skin. Avoid skin irritants. How do you take care of your skin. Good skin care is an essential part of controlling the itch and rash of atopic dermatitis. To help prevent a cycle of scratching, itching, and rash, keep your skin hydrated and identify and avoid skin irritants. If you still have problems with itch and rash even after you have been using moisturizers, talk to your doctor. Keeping your skin hydrated To care for your skin:. You may shower when atopic dermatitis is under control or when an outbreak is mild. Avoid washing with soap during every bath. Avoid adding bath oils and bubble bath to the bathwater, because they can reduce your skin's ability to absorb water. Pat your skin dry after a bath or shower. ...
http://ghc.org/kbase/topic.jhtml?docId=tn8133&secId=tn8144
*  Atopic Dermatitis: Taking Care of Your Skin
Update your browser or enable Javascript to view and use this site as designed. About Us. Careers. Group Health Research Institute. Group Health Foundation. LOG IN. Atopic Dermatitis: Taking Care of Your Skin. HOME. For Members. FIND YOUR WAY AROUND GROUP HEALTH Looking for Coverage. Individual Family. Medicare Advantage. State Employees PEBB. Federal Employees FEHB. Employer Sponsored Group Plans. Getting Started. Provider Facility Directory. Specialty Care. Health Care Services. Pharmacy Services. Drug Formulary. Customer Service. Member Governance Participation. HEALTH INFORMATION Health Wellness Resources. Northwest Health Magazine. Classes Events. Atopic Dermatitis: Taking Care of Your Skin. Introduction. Good skin care is an essential part of controlling the itch and rash of atopic dermatitis. To help prevent a cycle of itching, scratching, and rash, you can:. Keep your skin hydrated, and avoid dry skin. Avoid skin irritants. How do you take care of your skin. Good skin care is an ...
http://ghc.org/kbase/topic.jhtml?docId=tn8133&secId=tn8134
*  Atopic Dermatitis (eczema) Study
Atopic Dermatitis eczema Study. . Skip to Content. njhealth.org Home. For Professionals. Search for:. . Careers. Patient Portal Login. Main Navigation Patient Information. New Patients. Become a Patient. Make an Appointment. Ask a Question. Patient Stories. Patients. Patient Portal Login. Create Patient Portal Account. Make an Appointment. Email My Care Team. Forms Medical Records. Travel, Locations Logistics. About Your Visit. Prepare for Your Test. Insurance Billing. Online Bill Pay. Patient Education. Programs & Services. Directory A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. R. Q. S. T. U. V. W. X. Y. Z. Search All Programs Services Tests We Offer. Clinical Trials. Calendar of Events. Pediatrics - National Jewish Health for Kids. Research Education. For Professionals. More. Find a Doctor. Search by Name, Specialty, Program, or Research Search for:. . Search Alphabetically. Top Doc Rankings. Departments Divisions. Health Information. Pediatric Conditions. Medications. Ask a Question. En Español. ...
http://nationaljewish.org/Clinical-Trials/Atopic-Dermatitis-(eczema)-Study
*  Conditions InDepth: Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) | Wesley Medical Center
Conditions InDepth: Eczema Atopic Dermatitis. Wesley Medical Center. Careers. Twitter Facebook YouTube. Healthcare Insurance Marketplace Plans Include Wesley Medical Center. Patients & Visitors. Patients & Visitors. Patient Bill of Rights. Registration. Baby Pictures. Health Insurance. Registration. Our Services. Career Center. Career Center. Physician Careers at Wesley. Professional Education. Medical Student Orientation. Health Professionals. Medical Education and CME. Physician Careers at Wesley. Wesley Facilities. Wesley Medical Center. Wesley Children’s Hospital. WESLEYCare Clinics. Pediatric Center of Kansas. WESLEYCare Clinics. WESLEYCare Breastfeeding Clinic. WESLEYCare Family Medicine. WESLEYCare Orthopedic Clinic. WESLEYCare Surgery Clinic. WESLEYCare Women's Center. WESLEYCare Clinics. WesleyCare OT/PT Clinic. Main Page Risk Factors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Screening Reducing Your Risk Talking to Your Doctor Living With Eczema Resource Guide. Eczema is actually just another word for ...
http://wesleymc.com/hl/?/19374/Resource-Guide-for-Eczema--Atopic-Dermatitis-~Main-Page
*  Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)-Medications
Atopic Dermatitis Eczema -Medications. Skin Problems. Featured Topics. See what your medical symptoms could mean, and learn about possible conditions. Communities: Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life. WebMD Pain Coach. Track your pain levels, triggers, and treatments. Taking Medications During Pregnancy. WebMD My Medicine Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more. Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox. WebMD Mobile Drug Information App. Living Healthy. Featured Topics. Family Pregnancy. Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox. Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life. Medicines for atopic dermatitis are used to help control itching and heal the rash. If you or your child has a very mild itch and rash, you may be able to control it without medicine by using home treatment and preventive measures. ...
http://webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/eczema/tc/atopic-dermatitis-medications
*  Conditions InDepth: Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) - JFK Medical Center | Atlantis, FL
Conditions InDepth: Eczema Atopic Dermatitis - JFK Medical Center. Aventura Hospital & Medical Center. Lawnwood Medical Center & Heart Institute. University Hospital & Medical Center. Services. Services Medical Services A-Z. Breast Care. Heart & Vascular. Stroke Center. At JFK Medical Center, we treat the most important health concerns - yours. We provide healthcare services designed to meet your needs at every stage of your life. Patients & Visitors. Classes & Events. H2U - health to you. Patient Rights and Responsibilities and Patient Visitation Rights. Health Info. Health Info Health Library. Video Library. The more you know about your health, the better prepared you are to make informed healthcare decisions. Our health library gives you the information you need to take charge of your health. Contact Us. Health Library. The more you know about your health, the better prepared you are to make informed healthcare decisions. Our health library gives you the information you need to take charge of your ...
http://jfkmc.com/your-health/?/19374/Atopic-dermatitis
*  Conditions InDepth: Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) - JFK Medical Center | Atlantis, FL
Conditions InDepth: Eczema Atopic Dermatitis - JFK Medical Center. Aventura Hospital & Medical Center. Lawnwood Medical Center & Heart Institute. University Hospital & Medical Center. Services. Services Medical Services A-Z. Breast Care. Heart & Vascular. Stroke Center. At JFK Medical Center, we treat the most important health concerns - yours. We provide healthcare services designed to meet your needs at every stage of your life. Patients & Visitors. Classes & Events. H2U - health to you. Patient Rights and Responsibilities and Patient Visitation Rights. Health Info. Health Info Health Library. Video Library. The more you know about your health, the better prepared you are to make informed healthcare decisions. Our health library gives you the information you need to take charge of your health. Contact Us. Health Library. The more you know about your health, the better prepared you are to make informed healthcare decisions. Our health library gives you the information you need to take charge of your ...
http://jfkmc.com/your-health/?/19374/Previous
*  Conditions InDepth: Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) - Aventura Hospital | Aventura, FL
Conditions InDepth: Eczema Atopic Dermatitis - Aventura Hospital. University Hospital & Medical Center. Aventura. Services. Services Hospital Services A-Z. Heart & Vascular. Robotic Surgery. At Aventura Hospital Medical Center we treat the most important health concerns - yours. We provide healthcare services designed to meet your needs at every stage of your life. Patients & Visitors. Patients & Visitors Classes & Events. H2U - health to you. Patient Rights and Responsibilities and Patient Visitation Rights. Health Info. Health Info Health Library. Video Library. The more you know about your health, the better prepared you are to make informed healthcare decisions. Our health library gives you the information you need to take charge of your health. Contact Us. Health Library. The more you know about your health, the better prepared you are to make informed healthcare decisions. Our health library gives you the information you need to take charge of your health. Main Page Risk Factors Symptoms ...
http://aventurahospital.com/your-health/?/19374/What-is-eczema
*  Treatment and Management of Dermatitis
... Topical non-prescription products can provide relief from dermatitis. A number of topical non-prescription products are available to provide symptomatic relief and aid in managing atopic dermatitis and contact dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis, often referred to as eczema, is a general term for several types of inflammation of the skin. 1-6 Contact dermatitis CD is characterized by acute inflammation of the skin as a result of exposure to irritants or allergens. 7-10 Patients with contact dermatitis may have inflamed and swollen skin and may present with symptoms such as pruritus, erythema, and formation of vesicles and pustules. 7-10 The 2 types of contact dermatitis are irritant contact dermatitis ICD and allergic contact dermatitis ACD. 7-10 Signs and symptoms of ACD may include swollen, red skin and localized pruritus, rash, pain, and formation of blisters. Hydrocortisone is considered the most effective topical therapy for mild to moderate ...
http://pharmacytimes.com/publications/issue/2013/April2013/Treatment-and-Management-of-Dermatitis
*  Pruritus and Atopic Dermatitis.
... BioPortfolio The World's Leading Biotech, Healthcare and Medical Resource. Advanced Search Login Subscribe RSS. Loading. BioPortfolio. Menu. Loading. Topics. All Topics Biotechnology Biotech Business Biotech Products Cancer Cardiovascular Dermatology Drug Discovery Endocrinology Gastroenterology Immunology Infectious Diseases Mental Health Neurology Obstetrics Orthopedics Public Health Respiratory Rheumatology Urology Track topics Track topics important to you. World Biotech and Healthcare News. Publish Your News On BioPortfolio. Search News On BioPortfolio. Latest News. Citations. Search PubMed Research Papers. Latest Research Papers. Research Papers by Journal. Market Reports. Search Life Science Market Reports Store. Recent Market Research Reports added. Channels. Submit or Amend a Product Profile. Search Life Science Channels Database. Recent Technologies, Products and Technologies added. Clinical Trials. Search Clinical Trials. Latest Clinical Trials. Drugs. Search our Drug Database. Popular Drugs ...
http://bioportfolio.com/resources/pmarticle/128970/Pruritus-And-Atopic-Dermatitis.html
*  Cyclosporine for Atopic Dermatitis
Update your browser or enable Javascript to view and use this site as designed. Careers. Group Health Research Institute. Group Health Foundation. Cyclosporine for Atopic Dermatitis. For Members. FIND YOUR WAY AROUND GROUP HEALTH Looking for Coverage. Individual Family. Medicare Advantage. State Employees PEBB. Federal Employees FEHB. Employer Sponsored Group Plans. Provider Facility Directory. Health Care Services. Pharmacy Services. Drug Formulary. Customer Service. Member Governance Participation. Cyclosporine for Atopic Dermatitis. Topic Overview Cyclosporine such as Neoral is used to treat severe cases of adult atopic dermatitis that haven't responded to other treatments. By blocking the body's inflammation process, this oral medicine can help control itching and rash. Short-term treatment with cyclosporine works well in both adults and children. So your doctor will watch your treatment closely. Related Information Atopic Dermatitis Eczema. Credits By Healthwise Staff Primary ...
http://ghc.org/kbase/topic.jhtml?docId=tn8111&secId=tn8111-sec
*  Cyclosporine for Atopic Dermatitis | UW
Cyclosporine for Atopic Dermatitis. UW Health. Madison, WI. Skip to Content UW Health SMPH. American Family Children's Hospital Home. Online Services. Bill Pay. Classes and Support Groups. Donate. Greeting Cards. e-Newsletters. MyChart. Prescription Refill. Careers. Contact. Services. Clinics Hospitals. Search. Health Information. Credits. Cyclosporine for Atopic Dermatitis Skip to the navigation Topic Overview Cyclosporine such as Neoral is used to treat severe cases of adult atopic dermatitis that haven't responded to other treatments. Short-term treatment with cyclosporine works well in both adults and children. Related Information Atopic Dermatitis Eczema. Credits By Healthwise Staff Primary Medical Reviewer Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine Specialist Medical Reviewer Amy McMichael, MD - Dermatology. Next Section: Credits. Current as of: February 20, 2015. Author: Healthwise Staff Medical Review:. Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any ...
http://uwhealth.org/spanishhealth/topic/special/cyclosporine-for-atopic-dermatitis/tn8111.html
*  Clinical Trials | Experimental Treatment | National Eczema Association
Clinical Trials. National Eczema Association. News Research Eczema Prevalence in the United States. Clinical Trials. News Research Eczema Prevalence in the United States. Clinical Trials. Clinical Trials. Research Overview Eczema Prevalence in the US NEA Funded Research Eczema Drugs in Development Clinical Trials. Postdate: September 24, 2015 The primary objective for this study is to evaluate the safety of lebrikizumab compared with Topical Corticosteroids TCS alone in patients with persistent moderate to severe atopic dermatitis AD that is inadequately controlled with topical corticosteroids TCS. Postdate: September 24, 2015 Randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study will evaluate the efficacy of lebrikizumab administered subcutaneously SC in adult patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis AD who are inadequately controlled by topical corticosteroids TCS. Postdate: October 22, 2014 Study to Assess the Efficacy and Long-term Safety of Dupilumab in Adult Patients with ...
https://nationaleczema.org/research/clinical-trials/
*  Eczema Management: Avoid Irritants with Atopic Dermatitis
... Programs & Services. Search All Programs Services Tests We Offer. Find a Doctor. Healthy Lifestyle. Lifestyle Management Soak and Seal Eczema Treatment. Avoid Eczema Irritants. Avoid Things that Make Itching and Rash Worse There are many things that worsen the itching and rash of eczema atopic dermatitis. It's important to work closely with your healthcare provider to try to figure out what makes your itching, rash, and other symptoms worse. Itch-Scratch Cycle Almost everyone with eczema has had itchy skin at some time. Irritants, extremes of temperature and humidity, allergies, emotions and stress can worsen itching and rash. Chemical Irritants Things that cause burning, itching or redness are called irritants. Chemicals, solvents, soaps, detergents, fragrances, ingredients in skin care products, some fabrics and smoke are things you may need to avoid with your eczema. Your healthcare provider may recommend special patch testing to see if products you use or are exposed to may be causing an ...
http://nationaljewish.org/healthinfo/conditions/allergy/types/eczema/lifestyle-management/avoid-irritants/
*  Atopic Dermatitis Study: General Information
... Education and Training Funding. Extramural Research News Features. NIH Common Fund. Research at NHGRI. Clinical Research. DIR News Features. Online NHGRI Research Resources. Community Engagement Community Health Resources. Genetic Disorders, Genomics Healthcare. Online Health Resources. Genetics 101. Genetic Education Resources for Teachers. Online Genetics Education Resources. Privacy in Genomics. Media Resources. NHGRI-Related News. Careers Training. Online Careers Training Resources. Training Programs: Funding. Training Programs: Intramural. How to Contact Us. The NHGRI History of Genomics Program. External link, please review our disclaimer External link, please review our disclaimer External link, please review our disclaimer. Home Research at NHGRI Clinical Research Current NHGRI Clinical Studies Atopic Dermatitis Study General Information. Study of Skin Microflora in Children with Atopic Dermatitis: Eczema General Information The purpose of this study is to learn more about how ...
https://genome.gov/27532141
*  February 2013
Office of Professional Education. February 2013 News and Updates from the Office of Professional Education Interactive Technology for Pediatric Patients and Families with Atopic Dermatitis. The CME Committee. Interactive Technology for Pediatric Patients and Families with Atopic Dermatitis The Office of Professional Education received an educational grant from GlaxoSmithKline to educate physicians and improve the care of pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis in a medically underserved population. Through this funding National Jewish Health has developed a medical education program to train health care providers and team members from Rocky Mountain Youth Clinics RMYC to better diagnose and manage their atopic dermatitis patients. The eBook includes videos and photo galleries to engage pediatric patients and families with self-management tools and information on atopic dermatitis. The utilization of the eBook has expanded even beyond RMYC to the pediatric department at ...
http://nationaljewish.org/professionals/education/pro-ed/about-us/news/february-2013
*  Eczema (atopic dermatitis) | Health24
Eczema atopic dermatitis. Health24. advertisement. Health 24. Search. Win one of the 3 new devices worth R2000 each from Twisp. Win R100 000 cash with News24. Win a NutriBullet valued at R1 995. News. Public health. Fitness. Sex. Natural health. Heart. Diabetes. Mental Health. Cancer. Columns. Tests. Win. Newsletters. Medical. ADHD. Allergy. Arthritis. Cancer. Colds and flu. Cough. Depression. Diabetes. Erectile dysfunction. Eye Health. Headache. Hearing. Heart. HIV/Aids. Hypertension. IBS. Incontinence. Liver Health. Medical Schemes. Osteoporosis. Sore throat. Sleep disorders. Sports Injuries. Stroke. Tuberculosis. Vaginal infections. Medication. View all. Lifestyle. Fitness. Sex. Diet and nutrition. Healthy You. Woman. Man. Health and your money. Parenting. Stress. Pet health. Natural Health. Stop smoking. Environment. Vitamins minerals. All Lifestyle. Smoking alternatives. Seniors and caregivers. Ask an expert. CyberShrink. DietDoc. CyberDoc. Sexologist. GynaeDoc. ADHD. Allergy. Arthritis. Back ...
http://health24.com/Medical/Diseases/Eczema-atopic-dermatitis-Client-20120721
*  .. What you need to know About Dog Allergies .. Atopic Dermatitis .. Flea Allergy .. Inhalant Aller
What you need to know About Dog Allergies. Constant scratching, tail-biting, coughing and wheezing, eye and nose discharges – if these symptoms commonly occur with your dog, chances are that he/she is suffering from allergies. Yes, dogs, just like us can suffer from allergies. Major classifications of canine allergies are atopic dermatitis, flea allergy, food allergy and inhalant allergy.Â. Atopic Dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis is a skin allergy caused by a hypersensitivity to several and very common substances like molds and dust mites. If your dog scratches and licks himself excessively particularly licking and chewing the paws, abdomen and legs, and his/her ears are hot to the touch, he/she may be suffering from atopic dermatitis. Flea Allergy. Flea allergy is the most common form of canine allergy. However, it is not the flea but the flea’s saliva that your dog may be allergic to. To find out if your dog has flea allergies, a skin allergy test is required. Consult your vet ...
http://westie-info.com/tag/allergies/
*  Eczema and depression
... The relationship between the psychological and immunological state in patients with atopic dermatitis by Hashiro M, Okumura M Department of Dermatology, Kansai Rohsai Hospital, Hyogo, Japan. J Dermatol Sci 1998 Mar; 16 3 :231-5. ABSTRACT. T he relationship between the psychological and immunological state in patients with atopic dermatitis was investigated. It was found that patients with atopic dermatitis are significantly more depressive and scored higher for state anxiety P 0.05 than the normal control group. They also tended to be more psychosomatic symptom-prone and to score higher for trait anxiety. NK activity in patients with atopic dermatitis was significantly lower than in normal controls P 0.01, while serum IFN-gamma levels tended to be slightly higher and serum IL-4 levels somewhat lower. No significant correlation was detected between any pair of psychological test/immunological examination for either patients or normal controls. However, in the examination of ...
http://biopsychiatry.com/allatop.htm
*  Researchers discover genetic basis for Atopic Dermatitis
... Toggle navigation. E-Dermatology by Bell Raj Eapen. Home. About Me. Consult. Dental PG. Projects. SkinHelpDesk. Dermbase. OntoDerm. Slise. Virtual Dermatologist. Software. Skin Type. Laser. Mind Maps. Peel Score. OD-COD. Thesis Topics. Blogs. Skin Deep. Applied Bimatics. Fringe. SkinHelpDesk. Health Analytics. Leukodermic View. Personal. Resume. Publications. Wiki. Ebook. Contact. Applied Bimatics - An Informatics eHealth Blog I am a clinician with a passion for informatics. This blog is about my eHealth journey exploring interoperability in Electronic Medical Records EMR/EHR, Patient Safety, Pharmacovigilance, Data Analytics, Clinical Research and Bioinformatics in a clinical context. Comparing Canadian, Indian and Middle Eastern healthcare systems and services. Join our open facebook group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/clinical.bioinformaticians/. Site Home. Blog Home. Tweets by @beapen. Subscribe Feed. Archives January 2006. February 2006. March 2006. April 2006. May 2006. July 2006. ...
http://bioblog.gulfdoctor.net/2013/01/genetic-basis-for-atopic-dermatitis.html
*  .. Tag Archives: University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine .. GSD Atopic Dermatitis Gen
Tag Archives: University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine. 21 May. GSD Atopic Dermatitis Gene Is No Panacea. Posted by Susan Chaney No comments. Last week’s headline, “Researchers identify gene associated with eczema in dogs,” on the AlphaGalileo Foundation website, got me excited. Having researched atopic dermatitis for an article last September, I immediately imagined what this could mean for dog owners everywhere. However, as is often... Read more. 24 Apr. Intact Dogs Most Often Die from Infection or Trauma. Posted by Susan Chaney 9 comments. It’s long been acknowledged – and in some cases it’s quite obvious – that sterilized dogs and bitches won’t get certain diseases. After all, if a dog has no testicles, it’s not going to get testicular cancer. But now, as many are... Read more. 13 Sep. Take Control of Atopic Dermatitis. Posted by Susan Chaney 5 comments. A dog that licks or chews on its feet, rubs its face as if itchy, scratches under its front legs and ...
http://bestinshowdaily.com/blog/tag/university-of-georgia-college-of-veterinary-medicine/
*  National Jewish Health Receives Grant to Provide Atopic Dermatitis Education to Denver Pediatric
... Clinics. Skip to Content. njhealth.org Home. For Professionals. Search for:. . Careers. Patient Portal Login. Main Navigation Patient Information. New Patients. Become a Patient. Make an Appointment. Ask a Question. Patient Stories. Patients. Patient Portal Login. Create Patient Portal Account. Make an Appointment. Email My Care Team. Forms Medical Records. Travel, Locations Logistics. About Your Visit. Prepare for Your Test. Insurance Billing. Online Bill Pay. Patient Education. Programs & Services. Directory A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. R. Q. S. T. U. V. W. X. Y. Z. Search All Programs Services Tests We Offer. Clinical Trials. Calendar of Events. Pediatrics - National Jewish Health for Kids. Research Education. For Professionals. More. Find a Doctor. Search by Name, Specialty, Program, or Research Search for:. . Search Alphabetically. Top Doc Rankings. Departments Divisions. Health Information. Condition Information. Pediatric Conditions. Medications. Ask a Question. En Español. ...
http://nationaljewish.org/about/mediacenter/pressreleases/2012/ad-grant
*  National Jewish Health Receives Grant to Provide Atopic Dermatitis Education to Denver Pediatric
... Clinics. Skip to Content. njhealth.org Home. For Professionals. Search for:. . Careers. Patient Portal Login. Main Navigation Patient Information. New Patients. Become a Patient. Make an Appointment. Ask a Question. Patient Stories. Patients. Patient Portal Login. Create Patient Portal Account. Make an Appointment. Email My Care Team. Forms Medical Records. Travel, Locations Logistics. About Your Visit. Prepare for Your Test. Insurance Billing. Online Bill Pay. Patient Education. Programs & Services. Directory A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. R. Q. S. T. U. V. W. X. Y. Z. Search All Programs Services Tests We Offer. Clinical Trials. Calendar of Events. Pediatrics - National Jewish Health for Kids. Research Education. For Professionals. More. Find a Doctor. Search by Name, Specialty, Program, or Research Search for:. . Search Alphabetically. Top Doc Rankings. Departments Divisions. Health Information. Condition Information. Pediatric Conditions. Medications. Ask a Question. En Español. ...
http://nationaljewish.org/about/mediacenter/pressreleases/2012/ad-grant
*  Dermatitis
'Dermatitis', also known as 'eczema', is inflammation of the skin. The term 'eczema' is also commonly used to describe atopic dermatitis. also known as atopic eczema. In some languages, dermatitis and eczema are synonyms, while in other languages dermatitis implies an acute condition and eczema a chronic one. thumb|Eczema. thumb|Dermatitis of the hand. thumb|right|More severe eczema thumb|right|A patch of eczema that has been scratched The term "eczema" refers to a set of clinical characteristics. Further adding to the confusion, many sources use the term eczema for the most common type of eczema atopic dermatitis interchangeably. The European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology EAACI published a position paper in 2001, which simplifies the nomenclature of allergy-related diseases including atopic and allergic contact eczemas. In some languages, 'dermatitis' and 'eczema' are synonyms, while in other languages 'dermatitis' implies an acute ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dermatitis
*  Conditions InDepth: Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) | Memorial Hospital | Jacksonville, FL
Conditions InDepth: Eczema Atopic Dermatitis. Memorial Hospital. Jacksonville, FL. Find A Doctor. Find A Doctor Find A Doctor. Services. All Services. Ambulatory Surgery Centers. Behavioral Health Services. Emergency Care. Memorial Women's Center. Patients & Visitors. Patients & Visitors Patients & Visitors. Classes & Events. Florida Health Finder. H2U - health to you. Interpreter Services. Medical Records. Health Info. Health Info Health Info. Health Library. Video Library. For Professionals. For Professionals For Professionals. Careers. Hospital Affiliation Letters. Patient Transfer Center. Hospital Data. Hospital Information. Find A Doctor. Services. All Services. Ambulatory Surgery Centers. Behavioral Health Services. Emergency Care. Memorial Women's Center. Patients & Visitors. Memorial Hospital @MemorialJax Memorial has received a Gold Plus Award for Get With The Guidelines® - Stroke from @American Heart @American Stroke http://t.co/GcqhXJZoDn. Main Page Risk Factors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment ...
http://memorialhospitaljax.com/hl/?/19374/Lifestyle-Changes-to-Manage-Eczema--Atopic-Dermatitis-~Main-Page
*  Conditions InDepth: Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) | Coliseum Health System | Macon, GA
Conditions InDepth: Eczema Atopic Dermatitis. Coliseum Health System. Locations. Locations View All Locations. Coliseum Center for Behavioral Health. Coliseum Health System. Coliseum Medical Centers. Coliseum Northside Hospital. Services View All Services. Breast Health. Cancer Care. Patients & Visitors. Patients & Visitors Patients & Visitors. Classes & Events. H2U - health to you. Health Info. Medical Records. Pay Bill Online. Careers. Hospital Affiliation Letters. Patient Transfer Center. Locations. Locations. Locations View All Locations. Coliseum Center for Behavioral Health. Coliseum Health System. Coliseum Medical Centers. Coliseum Northside Hospital. Services View All Services. Breast Health. Cancer Care. Patients & Visitors. Patients & Visitors Classes & Events. Coliseum Celebrates Breast Cancer Awareness Coliseum Health System will "Stand Up to Breast Cancer" throughout the month of October as we celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Main Page Risk Factors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment ...
http://coliseumhealthsystem.com/hl/?/19374/
*  SID Site
... HOME. ABOUT THE SID. FALL 2014 ISSUE. PAST ISSUES. RESEARCHER PROFILES. SID WEBSITE. SID ATOPIC DERMATITIS CONFERENCE. Current Highlights Society for Investigative Dermatology SID Launches Skin Research Information Portal. SID Conference on Atopic Dermatitis. Fall 2014 Issue - Atopic Dermatitis. Abstracts & Commentary Research and Commentary. Many perceive the research enterprise as something incomprehensible and boring. When you learn about it, you find that there are a lot of surprising and interesting stories, and the battle against disease is a dynamic battleground. The adversary we would like to tell you about in this story is Atopic Dermatitis AD. According to the National Eczema Association NEA skin disease known as Atopic Dermatitis or eczema affects nearly 30 million Americans. There is no known cure. You may not die from this, but may be sentenced to life living with it. It is especially common in children under age three, and can be very severe. From the ...
http://skin-research.org/
*  Filaggrin in atopic dermatitis (Reprinted from J Allergy Clin Immunol vol 122, pg 689-93, 2008) - Re
Filaggrin in atopic dermatitis Reprinted from J Allergy Clin Immunol vol 122, pg 689-93, 2008 - Research Database, The University of Dundee. University of Dundee. university home. college services. courses. research. contacts. a-z. help. University Search. Discovery - University of Dundee - Online Publications. Library Learning Centre. Home. About. Researchers. Research Units. Research Outputs. Theses. Activities. Press. Datasets. Research Outputs. Journals. Publishers. . Filaggrin in atopic dermatitis Reprinted from J Allergy Clin Immunol vol 122, pg 689-93, 2008. Overview. Citation formats. Filaggrin in atopic dermatitis Reprinted from J Allergy Clin Immunol vol 122, pg 689-93, 2008. Research output : Contribution to journal › Article. View graph of relations. Authors. Grainne M. O'Regan Aileen Sandilands W. H Irwin McLean Alan D. Irvine. Research units. CMDN Molecular Medicine. Molecular Cellular Pathology. Info. Original language English. Pages R2-R6. Number of pages 5. Journal. ...
http://discovery.dundee.ac.uk/portal/en/research/filaggrin-in-atopic-dermatitis-reprinted-from-j-allergy-clin-immunol-vol-122-pg-68993-2008(d4b249d8-ba05-4255-969b-236e31963c55).html
*  Dermatitis. Leg dermatitis. DermNet NZ
... DermNet NZ. Facts about the skin from DermNet New Zealand Trust. Dermatitis. Leg dermatitis Learning objectives Classification Venous dermatitis Asteatotic dermatitis Differential diagnosis Management Activity Learning objectives Classify and manage dermatitis affecting the leg. Classification Dermatitis exclusively or predominantly affecting legs may be due to: Venous stasis. Varicose veins. Contact factors. Atopic dermatitis. Nummular dermatitis. Venous stasis Normally during walking the leg muscles pump blood upwards and valves in the veins prevent pooling. Deep venous thrombosis or varicose veins may damage the valves resulting in oedema, particularly after prolonged standing and during hot weather. Dermatitis due to venous disease also known as stasis eczema and gravitational dermatitis can arise as discrete patches or affect the leg circumferentially. Common complications include: Impetiginisation. Cellulitis. Autosensitisation ...
http://dermnetnz.org/doctors/dermatitis/leg.html
*  Epiceram | Topical Immunomodulators
epiceram topical immunomodulators home contact us site map healthcare professionals fran ais for residents of united states of america click here about atopic dermatitis who is affected treating atopic dermatitis what is epiceram q a what is atopic dermatitis symptoms of atopic dermatitis what causes atopic dermatitis genetic factors hypothesis about where the disease starts prevalence age of onset impact on lifestyle lifestyle modifications topical corticosteroids topical immunomodulators moisturizers epiceram what kind of treatment is epiceram how does epiceram work are there any side effects with epiceram who can use epiceram is epiceram only for atopic dermatitis treating atopic dermatitis lifestyle modifications topical corticosteroids topical immunomodulators moisturizers epiceram pdf mb pdf mb download adobe reader topical immunomodulators topical immunomodulators work by directly suppressing the immune system because they are powerful agents and can ...
http://epiceram.ca/topical_immunomodulators.php
*  Atopic Dermatitis (Discharge Care) - Care Guide
Atopic Dermatitis Discharge Care - Care Guide. All Consumer Professional Pill ID Interactions News FDA Alerts Approvals Pipeline Clinical Trials Care Notes Encyclopedia Dictionary Natural Products. News. Atopic Dermatitis. Atopic Dermatitis. Eczema is an itchy, red skin rash. Certain conditions and substances called "triggers" may cause your skin to break out. Some triggers are dry skin, stress, and infections. Eczema may also be triggered by allergies and things that irritate the skin. Treatment includes staying away from things that cause your eczema flare-ups, and using moisturizers and special medicines. Medicines:. Learn why you take each medicine. Ask your caregiver for information about your medicine. Always take your medicine as directed by caregivers. Call your caregiver if you think your medicines are not helping or if you feel you are having side effects. Do not quit taking your medicines until you discuss it with your caregiver. Gently dot or rub creams or ointments into your ...
http://drugs.com/cg/atopic-dermatitis-discharge-care.html
*  EUCERIN
... . SKIN CONCERNS. Acne prone skin. Face. ABOUT PRODUCT TYPES. Acne prone skin in general. Acne prone skin with medication. Acne prone skin without medication. Cleansing-toning. Covering. Face care. Special treatment. . Sun. ABOUT. Acne prone skin in general. . Ageing skin. ABOUT PRODUCT TYPES. Ageing skin in general. Loss of volume. Prevention. Sensitive ageing skin. Wrinkles. Cleansing-toning. Eye care. Face care. Special treatment. . Atopic dermatitis. Face. ABOUT PRODUCT TYPES. Atopic Dermatitis on children's face. Atopic Dermatitis on face in flare-up. Atopic Dermatitis on the face. Face care. Special treatment. . Body. ABOUT PRODUCT TYPES. Atopic Dermatitis on body in flare-up. Atopic Dermatitis on children's body. Atopic Dermatitis on the body. Body care. Special treatment. . Hypersensitive, redness-prone skin. ABOUT PRODUCT TYPES. Hypersensitive facial skin. Hypersensitivity in general. Redness-prone facial skin. Cleansing-toning. Face care. . ...
http://eucerin.my/
*  MayoClinic.com Health Library - Dermatitis
Find a Doctor. myHealth eLink Request an Appointment. Specialty Services. Riverside Regional Medical Center Riverside Walter Reed Hospital Riverside Tappahannock Hospital Riverside Shore Memorial Hospital Riverside Doctors' Hospital Specialty Hospitals. Riverside Rehabilitation Institute Hampton Roads Specialty Hospital Riverside Behavioral Health Center. Log In to myHealth eLink. About myHealth eLink Find a Doctor Request an Appointment Schedule a Mammogram. riversideonline.com Home » MayoClinic.com Health Library » Disease & Conditions. Dermatitis. Dermatitis. Definition Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications Preparing for your appointment Tests and diagnosis Treatments and drugs Lifestyle and home remedies Alternative medicine Prevention Definition. Although dermatitis can have many causes and occurs in many forms, this disorder usually involves an itchy rash on swollen, reddened skin. Examples of dermatitis include atopic dermatitis eczema, dandruff, and rashes ...
http://riversideonline.com/health_reference/Disease-Conditions/DS00339.cfm
*  .. Sign-up for DrGreene's Newsletter .. Related concepts: .. Introduction to eczema: .. What is ecz
We will not share your email address and never spam. Atopic dermatitis, Baby eczema. What is eczema. Technically, the word eczema is a general term, referring to a broad range of red, itchy rashes, including contact allergies such as poison oak. Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common skin conditions in children. Patches of sensitive skin flare-up in a rash in response to certain triggers. Rubbing or scratching the skin Excessive moisture, such as from saliva or milk Excessive dryness Overheating Cold air Common house dust Wool or other scratchy fabric Cow’s milk Wheat Soy Peanuts Nuts Eggs Dog or cat dander Cigarette smoke Clothes washed in an irritating detergent Soap Atopic dermatitis can become a vicious cycle. The skin becomes more inflamed. Who gets eczema. Atopic dermatitis is most common in children who have family members with asthma, allergies, or atopic dermatitis. Patches in babies are also common on the neck, wrists, hands, and on the skin over the ...
http://drgreene.com/articles/eczema/
*  Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) in Children | Symptoms & Treatments
Eczema Atopic Dermatitis in Children. Conditions & Health Topics. Clinical Services. Visiting Cincinnati Children's. Quick Links. Cincinnati Children’s Champions. Clinical Services. Quick Links. Research At Cincinnati Children's. Quick Links. Cincinnati Children’s Research Foundation. Quick Links. Quick Links. Visiting Cincinnati Children's. Our Clinical Services. Children with atopic dermatitis may have allergies to foods, pets or other animals, dust mites, tree pollens and grasses, although it is not clear that these allergies actually “cause” the eczema in most children.. Rarely, some children with atopic dermatitis may develop allergies to chemicals in their moisturizers, other skincare products, clothing or topical medications. Children with eczema develop red, dry, itchy patches on the skin that result from inflammation. Frequent follow-up with your doctor is important so he or she can see whether the prescribed medicines are working. For children with environmental allergies such ...
http://cincinnatichildrens.org/health/e/eczema/
*  Category:Atopic dermatitis
category atopic dermatitis category atopic dermatitis atopic dermatitis is a chronic dermatitis associated with a hereditary tendency to develop allergies to food and inhalant substances category dermatitis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Atopic_dermatitis
*  Investigation of the effect of probiotic exposure on filaggrin expression in an experimental model o
... f canine atopic dermatitis - Marsella - 2013 - Veterinary Dermatology - Wiley Online Library. Skip to Main Content. Log in / Register. Log In. E-Mail Address. Password. Forgotten Password. Remember Me. Register. Institutional Login. Home. Veterinary Medicine. Veterinary Dermatology. Veterinary Dermatology. Vol 24 Issue 2. Abstract. JOURNAL TOOLS Get New Content Alerts. Get RSS feed. Save to My Profile. Get Sample Copy. Recommend to Your Librarian. JOURNAL MENU Journal Home FIND ISSUES Current Issue. All Issues FIND ARTICLES Early View. Most Accessed. Most Cited. GET ACCESS Subscribe / Renew. FOR CONTRIBUTORS OnlineOpen. Author Guidelines. Submit an Article. ABOUT THIS JOURNAL Society Information. News. Overview. Editorial Board. Permissions. Advertise. Contact. SPECIAL FEATURES WCVD Abstracts Archive. ESVD-ECVD Congress Abstracts Archive. Hot Topics Archive. North American Veterinary Dermatology Forum Abstracts Archive. Wiley Job Network. Professional Opportunities. Jobs. Scientific Paper ...
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/vde.12006/abstract
*  SCORAD
... scoring atopic dermatitis is a clinical tool for assessing the severity i e extent intensity of atopic dermatitis as objectively as possible it gives approximate weights of to intensity and each to spread extent and subjective signs insomnia etc it was developed by the european task force on atopic dermatitis in see also eczema references external links at university of nantes category atopic dermatitis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCORAD
*  Eucerin: AtopiControl | Dermo-cosmetic care for dry and irritable skin
Dermo-cosmetic care for dry and irritable skin. ABOUT INDICATIONS PRODUCT TYPES. Acne prone skin in general. Sun and sensitive and problematic skin. Face care. SUN PROTECTION FOR OILY AND ACNE PRONE SKIN Superior sun protection - Oil Control, anti-shine effect Read more. Sun. Acne prone skin in general. SUN PROTECTION FOR OILY AND ACNE PRONE SKIN Superior sun protection - Oil Control, anti-shine effect Read more. ABOUT INDICATIONS PRODUCT TYPES. Sensitive ageing skin. Face care. ABOUT PRODUCT TYPES. Atopic Dermatitis on children's face. Atopic Dermatitis on face in flare-up. Atopic Dermatitis on the face. Body care. Face care. ABOUT PRODUCT TYPES. Atopic Dermatitis on body in flare-up. Atopic Dermatitis on children's body. Atopic Dermatitis on the body. Body care. Dry skin. ABOUT INDICATIONS PRODUCT TYPES. Dry and very dry facial skin. Dry skin in general. Face care. ABOUT INDICATIONS PRODUCT TYPES. Dry and very dry body skin. Dry skin in general. Body care. Scalp & ...
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... . Cookies on the Eucerin Website. We use cookies to provide you with a seamless and comfortable user experience on our website. By continuing to navigate this site you agree to the cookie policy. Learn more about cookies on our Cookie Policy page. Continue. Learn more →. SKIN CONCERNS. Blemish prone skin. Face. ABOUT. INDICATIONS. PRODUCT TYPES. Acne prone skin in general. Acne prone skin with medication. Acne prone skin without medication. Sun and sensitive and problematic skin. Cleansing-toning. Concealing. Face care. Special treatment. . Sun. ABOUT. Acne prone skin in general. . Ageing skin. ABOUT. INDICATIONS. PRODUCT TYPES. Age-induced dryness. Ageing skin in general. Loss of volume. Prevention. Sensitive ageing skin. Wrinkles. Age spots. Cleansing-toning. Eye care. Face care. Special treatment. . Atopic skin. Face. ABOUT. PRODUCT TYPES. Atopic Dermatitis on children's face. Atopic Dermatitis on face in flare-up. Atopic Dermatitis on the face. Face care. Lip care. Special ...
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*  Atopic dermatitis - Mayo Clinic
atopic dermatitis mayo clinic diseases and conditions atopic dermatitis eczema original article http www mayoclinic org diseases conditions dermatitis eczema multimedia atopic dermatitis img mayo clinic footer legal conditions and terms any use of this site constitutes your agreement to the terms and conditions and privacy policy linked below terms and conditions privacy policy notice of privacy practices advertising mayo clinic is a not for profit organization and proceeds from web advertising help support our mission mayo clinic does not endorse any of the third party products and services advertised advertising and sponsorship policy advertising and sponsorship opportunities reprint permissions a single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only mayo mayo clinic mayoclinic org mayo clinic healthy living and the triple shield mayo clinic logo are trademarks of mayo foundation for medical education and research mayo foundation for medical ...
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*  What Are Some Of The Common Symptoms Of Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)? - ABC News
What Are Some Of The Common Symptoms Of Atopic Dermatitis Eczema. - ABC News. Sections. Sections. Politics. Entertainment. Health. Tech. Good News. Good Morning America. World News Tonight. Nightline. This Week. Live. Live. Now on ABC News. New York City. Los Angeles. Chicago. Philadelphia. San Francisco - Oakland - San Jose. Houston. Durham - Raleigh - Fayetteville. Fresno. abc.com. fusion.net. espn.com. fivethirtyeight.com. grantland.com. disney.com. Privacy Policy. Your CA Privacy Rights. Children's Online Privacy Policy. Interest-Based Ads. Terms of Use. Contact Us. Yahoo!-ABC News Network. 2015 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. Search. ABC News. Health. Tech. Health. Tech. Good News. Job Search. More ABCNews. New York City New York City. Los Angeles Los Angeles. Chicago Chicago. Philadelphia Philadelphia. San Francisco - Oakland - San Jose San Francisco - Oakland - San Jose. Houston Houston. Durham - Raleigh - Fayetteville Durham - Raleigh - Fayetteville. Fresno Fresno. abc.com ...
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*  Atopic Dermatitis | UW Health | Madison,
Atopic Dermatitis. UW Health. Skip to Content UW Health SMPH. American Family Children's Hospital Home. Online Services. Bill Pay. CarePages. Classes and Support Groups. Donate. Greeting Cards. e-Newsletters. Flowers and Gifts. MyChart. Prescription Refill. Careers. Contact. Services. Clinics Hospitals. Find a Doctor. Search. Health Information. Health Information Home. En Espa ol. Atopic Dermatitis Skip to the navigation Atopic dermatitis, sometimes called eczema, is a skin problem that causes dry skin, intense itching, and a red, raised rash. Current as of: February 20, 2015. Author: Healthwise Staff Medical Review: Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. To learn more about Healthwise, visit Healthwise.org 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated. Awards and Recognition View All Social ...
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*  Factors Associated with Steroid Phobia in Caregivers of Children with Atopic Dermatitis - Kojima - 2
... 012 - Pediatric Dermatology - Wiley Online Library. Skip to Main Content. Log in / Register. Log In. E-Mail Address. Password. Forgotten Password. Remember Me. Register. Institutional Login. Home. Dermatology. Dermatology. Pediatric Dermatology. Vol 30 Issue 1. Abstract. JOURNAL TOOLS Get New Content Alerts. Get RSS feed. Save to My Profile. Get Sample Copy. Recommend to Your Librarian. JOURNAL MENU Journal Home FIND ISSUES Current Issue. All Issues FIND ARTICLES Early View. GET ACCESS Subscribe / Renew. FOR CONTRIBUTORS OnlineOpen. Author Guidelines. Submit an Article. ABOUT THIS JOURNAL Society Information. News. Overview. Editorial Board. Permissions. Advertise. Contact. SPECIAL FEATURES Professional Opportunities. Wiley Job Network. Pediatric Dermatology App. Patient Perspectives. Jobs. CLINICAL AND LABORATORY INVESTIGATION Factors Associated with Steroid Phobia in Caregivers of Children with Atopic Dermatitis. Reiji Kojima M.D. 1,2,3,4, Takeo Fujiwara M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H. 5, Akio Matsuda Ph.D. ...
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1525-1470.2012.01808.x/references
*  Follicular atopic dermatitis
... redirect atopic dermatitis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Follicular_atopic_dermatitis
*  Prednicarbate - Drug Info, Side Effects, Research, Clinical Trials
... Rx drug information, pharmaceutical research, clinical trials, news, and more. Prednicarbate Prednicarbate - Summary. Rx Info. Summary Description and Clinical Pharmacology Indications and Dosage Warnings and Precautions Side Effects and Adverse Reactions Drug Interactions, Overdosage, Contraindications, Other Rx Info Active Ingredients. Published Studies Curr't Clinical Trials. PREDNICARBATE SUMMARY. NEWS HIGHLIGHTS Published Studies Related to Prednicarbate. In this study, we investigated the effect of calcipotriol, prednicarbate and clobetasol 17-propionate on skin thickness over a treatment period of 6 weeks. Prednicarbate activity and benefit/risk ratio in relation to other topical glucocorticoids. Patients with severe atopic dermatitis and those who relapse frequently should profit from the treatment with these newer glucocorticoids. Clinical Trials Related to Prednicarbate. Bisphosphonate and Anastrozole Trial - Bone Maintenance Algorithm Assessment The purpose of this study is to evaluate ...
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*  Dermatitis Lifestyle and home remedies - Mayo Clinic
... All Mayo Clinic Topics. Patient Care & Health Info. Healthy Lifestyle. Diseases & Conditions A-Z. Drugs & Supplements A-Z. Appointments. Patient & Visitor Guide. Patient Online Services. Quality Care Find out why Mayo Clinic is the right place for your health care. About Mayo Clinic. Contact Us. Meet the Staff Find a directory of doctors and departments at all Mayo Clinic campuses. Find Clinical Trials. Research and Clinical Trials See how Mayo Clinic research and clinical trials advance the science of medicine and improve patient care. Mayo Medical School. Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education. Mayo School of Health Sciences. Visit Our Schools Educators at Mayo Clinic train tomorrow’s leaders to deliver compassionate, high-value, safe patient care. Professional Services Explore Mayo Clinic’s many resources and see jobs available for medical professionals. Products & Services. Mayo Clinic Membership. Mayo Clinic Health Letter. Medical Products. Medical Laboratory Services. Giving to Mayo Clinic. ...
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*  Pimecrolimus 1% Cream for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis
pimecrolimus cream for the treatment of atopic dermatitis skin therapy letter com written for dermatologists by dermatologists indexed by the us national library of medicine skin information network
http://skintherapyletter.com/2005/10.8/1.html
*  JCI - New insights into atopic dermatitis
... About For authors Alerts Advertise Subscribe Contact. Current Issue. Past Issues. By specialty Autoimmunity Cardiology Gastroenterology Immunology Metabolism Nephrology Neuroscience Oncology Pulmonology Vascular biology All... Videos Conversations with Giants in Medicine Author's Takes. Reviews. Reviews View all reviews... Review Series Cancer Immunotherapy Sep 2015 Autoimmunity Jun 2015 Enteric Nervous System Mar 2015 Autophagy Jan 2015 Gut Microbiome Oct 2014 Nephrology Jun 2014 Lymphatic Vasculature Mar 2014 View all review series... Collections Recently published Commentaries Editorials Hindsight The Attending Physician First Author Perspectives Scientific Show Stoppers Opinion Top read articles. Clinical Medicine JCI This Month Current issue Past issues. The Journal of Clinical Investigation. About For authors Current issue Past issues By specialty Subscribe Alerts Advertise Contact us Videos Conversations with Giants in Medicine Author's Takes Collections Commentaries Editorials Hindsight ...
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*  Conditions InDepth: Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) | LewisGale Regional Health System
Conditions InDepth: Eczema Atopic Dermatitis. LewisGale Regional Health System. LewisGale Medical Center / LewisGale Hospital Alleghany / LewisGale Hospital Montgomery / LewisGale Hospital Pulaski. Search for a Doctor Now. Services at LewisGale. Services. Services. Heart Vascular LewisGale hospitals offer fast, specialized emergency heart care that makes a critical difference when minutes count. Mental Health LewisGale Regional Health System offers hope, help, encouragement and support for individuals with emotional, behavioral and mental health needs. Orthopedic Spine Care Joint and spine conditions can cause pain and limit your quality of life. Our Core Services View All Services. Locations. LewisGale Hospital Alleghany. LewisGale Hospital Montgomery. LewisGale Hospital Pulaski. LewisGale Medical Center. Our Locations. Our network includes four hospitals, six outpatient centers, two cancer centers and 700 physicians at more than 160 affiliated locations stretching from Alleghany Highlands and ...
http://lewisgale.com/hl/?/19374/Resource-Guide-for-Eczema--Atopic-Dermatitis-~Main-Page

Atopic dermatitisInterstitial granulomatous dermatitis: Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis is a condition that most commonly presents with symmetrical round-to-oval erythematous or violaceous plaques on the flanks, axillae, inner thighs, and lower abdomen.James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005).Contact dermatitisDermatitis herpetiformisSeborrhoeic dermatitisDefatting (medical): Defatting is the chemical dissolving of dermal lipids, from the skin, on contact with defatting agents. This can result in water loss from the affected area and cause the whitening and drying of the skin which may result in cracking, secondary infection and chemical irritant contact dermatitis.Iodopropynyl butylcarbamatePeriorificial dermatitis: Periorificial dermatitis is a cutaneous condition characterized by a combination of perioral dermatitis and periocular dermatitis.ErythrodermaUremic pruritus: Uremic pruritus (also known as uraemic pruritus or renal pruritus) is caused by chronic kidney failure and is the most common internal systemic cause of itching.James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005).Hapalonychia: Hapalonychia, also known as egg-shell nail, is a condition in which the top of a toe or finger nail becomes soft and thin, causing it to bend or break. This condition can manifest as a result of genetic discrepancy James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005).Dermal equivalent: The dermal equivalent is an in vitro model of the dermal layer of skin. It is constructed by seeding dermal fibroblasts into a collagen gel.Granuloma facialeAquaphor: Aquaphor is a brand of over the counter skin care ointments manufactured by Beiersdorf Inc., an affiliate of Beiersdorf AG.AlitretinoinBreast eczema: Breast eczema (also known as "Nipple eczema") may affect the nipples, areolae, or surrounding skin, with eczema of the nipples being of the moist type with oozing and crusting, in which painful fissuring is frequently seen, especially in nursing mothers.James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005).OxybenzoneIrritant diaper dermatitisTrichobilharzia regenti: Trichobilharzia regenti is a nasal parasite of birds that causes cercarial dermatitis in humans. The species was described in 1998 by Czech scientists P.Optimmune: Optimmune is an ophthalmic ointment with ciclosporin as the active ingredient for the treatment of pannus and chronic idiopathic keratoconjunctivitis sicca in dogs. It is a veterinary product produced by Intervet, which is part of Merck.Urushiol: Urushiol is an oily organic allergen found in plants of the family Anacardiaceae, especially Toxicodendron spp. (e.Psoriasis: (psora + -iasis)Throat irritation: Throat irritation can refer to a dry cough, a scratchy feeling at the back of the throat, or a sensation of a lumpy feeling or something stuck at the back of the throat.Allergen immunotherapy: Allergen immunotherapy, also known as desensitization or hypo-sensitization, is a medical treatment for some types of allergies. It is useful for environmental allergies, allergies to insect bites, and asthma.Calamine: Calamine is either a mixture of zinc oxide (ZnO) with about 0.5% ferric oxide (Fe2O3) or a zinc carbonate compound.C3H3NO2Antipruritic: Antipruritics, also known as anti-itch drugs, are medications that inhibit the itching (Latin: pruritus) often associated with sunburns, allergic reactions, eczema, psoriasis, chickenpox, fungal infections, insect bites and stings like those from mosquitoes, fleas, and mites, and contact dermatitis and urticaria caused by plants such as poison ivy (urushiol-induced contact dermatitis) or stinging nettle.Elimination diet: An elimination diet is a method of identifying foods that an individual cannot consume without adverse effects. Adverse effects may be due to food allergy, food intolerance, other physiological mechanisms (such as metabolic or toxins), or a combination of these.Drug eruptionPrimary cutaneous aspergillosis: Primary cutaneous aspergillosis is a rare skin condition most often occurring at the site of intravenous cannulas in immunosuppressed patients.Necrolytic acral erythema: Necrolytic acral erythema is a cutaneous condition that is a manifestation of hepatitis C viral infection or zinc deficiency.Eczema vaccinatumVetiver System: The Vetiver System (VS) is a system of soil and water conservation whose main component is the use of the vetiver plant in hedgerows. It is promoted by the Vetiver Network International (TVNI), an international non-governmental organization.Ocular rosacea: Ocular rosacea is a manifestation of rosacea that affects the eyes and eyelids. Signs and symptoms generally consist of redness, irritation or burning of the eyes.FluorobenzeneLumpers and splitters: Lumpers and splitters are opposing factions in any discipline which has to place individual examples into rigorously defined categories. The lumper-splitter problem occurs when there is the need to create classifications and assign examples to them, for example schools of literature, biological taxa and so on.Keratinocyte: A keratinocyte is the predominant cell type in the epidermis, the outermost layer of the skin, constituting 90% of the cells found there.Preauricular sinus and cystDavid Southall: David Southall is a British paediatrician who is an expert in international maternal and child hospital healthcare and in child protection including the diagnosis of the controversial Fabricated or Induced Illness (FII, also known as "Munchausen syndrome by proxy"), and who has performed significant research into sudden infant death syndrome.Gluten exorphin: Gluten exorphins are a group of opioid peptides formed during digestion of the gluten protein. It has been hypothesized that people with autism and schizophrenia have abnormal leakage from the gut of these compounds, which then pass into the brain and disrupt brain functionAutism and Schizophrenia: Intestinal Disorders, Cade, et al.Linear IgA bullous dermatosis: Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (also known as "Linear IgA dermatosis") is frequently associated with medication exposure, especially vancomycin, with men and women being equally affected.James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005).Intertrigo: (ILDS L30.490))Hoof boot: A hoof boot is a device made primarily of polyurethane and is designed to cover the hooves of a horse as an alternative to, and occasionally in addition to, horseshoes. Hoof boots can also be used as a protective device when the animal has a hoof injury that requires protection of the sole of the hoof, or to aid in the application of medication.List of cosmetic ingredients: Ingredients of cosmetic products are listed following International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI).Besins HealthcareDermatopathology: Dermatopathology (from Greek , derma, "skin"; , pathos, "fate, harm"; and , -logia) is a joint subspecialty of dermatology and pathology and to a lesser extent of surgical pathology that focuses on the study of cutaneous diseases at a microscopic and molecular level. It also encompasses analyses of the potential causes of skin diseases at a basic level.RetigabineOsteoporosis circumscripta: Osteoporosis Circumscripta Cranii refers to a highly circumscribed (focal) lytic lesion of the skull bone as seen on X-ray in patients with Paget's disease of bones. This focal lesion can be fairly large.Jewelry designer: A jewelry designer or jewellery designer (see American and British English spelling differences) whose occupation is jewelry design. It is a person who renders original jewelry creations and usually constructs them as well.Ulcerative dermatitis: Ulcerative dermatitis is a skin disorder in rodents associated with bacterial growth often initiated by self-trauma due to a possible allergic response. Although other organisms can be involved, bacteria culture frequently shows Staphylococcus aureus.OxatomideOat sensitivity: Oat sensitivity represents a sensitivity to the proteins found in oats, Avena sativa. Sensitivity to oatsRelaxer: A relaxer is a type of lotion or cream generally used by people with tight curls or very curly hair which makes hair easier to straighten by chemically "relaxing" the natural curls. The active agent is usually a strong alkali, although some formulations are based on ammonium thioglycolate instead.AcariasisType I hypersensitivity: Type I hypersensitivity (or immediate hypersensitivity) is an allergic reaction provoked by reexposure to a specific type of antigen referred to as an allergen. Type I is not to be confused with Type II, Type III, or Type IV hypersensitivities.Petroleum jelly: Petroleum jelly, petrolatum, white petrolatum, soft paraffin or multi-hydrocarbon, CAS number 8009-03-8, is a semi-solid mixture of hydrocarbons (with carbon numbers mainly higher than 25), originally promoted as a topical ointment for its healing properties.Lars Larsen Forsæth: Lars Larsen Forsæth (baptized 9 December 1759 – 12 February 1839) was a Norwegian farmer who served as a representative at the Norwegian Constituent Assembly. Tallak Lindstøl: Stortinget og Statsraadet, Kristiania, 1914.TacrolimusOld German Shepherd Dog: Old German Shepherd Dog () is a controversial predicate for the long-hair variation of the German Shepherd Dog (), which is not a separate breed recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale. Nonetheless, there are efforts to establish this variety as a separate breed.CCL27: Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 27 (CCL27) is a small cytokine belonging to the CC chemokine family also known under the names IL-11 R-alpha-locus chemokine (ILC), Skinkine, ESkine and Cutaneous T-cell-attracting chemokine (CTACK). It is associated with homing of memory T lymphocytes to the skin, and plays a role in T cell-mediated inflammation of the skin.DapsoneUrticariaNickel electroplating: Nickel electroplating is a technique of electroplating a thin layer of nickel onto a metal object. The nickel layer can be decorative, provide corrosion resistance, wear resistance, or used to build up worn or undersized parts for salvage purposes.Congenital cutaneous candidiasis: Congenital cutaneous candidiasis, previously known as Beck-Ibrahim disease, is a skin condition in newborn babies caused by premature rupture of membranes together with a birth canal infected with Candida albicans.Majocchi's disease: Majocchi's disease (also known as "Purpura annularis telangiectodes," and "Purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi") is a skin condition characterized by bluish-red 1- to 3-cm annular patches composed of dark red telangiectases with petechiae.FluocinonideBeare–Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome: Beare–Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by craniosynostosis (premature fusion of certain bones of the skull, sometimes resulting in a characteristic 'cloverleaf skull'; further growth of the skull is prevented, and therefore the shape of the head and face is abnormal) and a specific skin abnormality, called cutis gyrata, characterized by a furrowed and wrinkled appearance (particularly in the face and on the palms and soles of the feet); thick, dark, velvety areas of skin (acanthosis nigricans) are sometimes found on the hands and feet and in the groin.http://ghr.Brevipalpus: Brevipalpus is a genus of mites in the family Tenuipalpidae, the flat mites.Brevipalpus californicus.Crystal earpiece: A crystal earpiece, is a type of piezoelectric earphone, producing sound by using a piezoelectric crystal, a material that changes its shape when electricity is applied to it. It is usually designed to plug into the ear canal of the user.Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis of infancy: Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis of infancy (also known as "Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis in infancy," "Infantile eosinophilic pustular folliculitis," and "Neonatal eosinophilic pustular folliculitis") is a cutaneous condition characterized by recurrent pruritic crops of follicular vesiculopustular lesions.Graham-Little syndrome: Graham-Little syndrome is a cutaneous condition characterized by lichen planus-like skin lesions.Freedberg, et al.Molluscum contagiosumUltraviolet light therapyCCL17: Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 17 (CCL17) is a small cytokine belonging to the CC chemokine family is also known as thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC). CCL17 is expressed constitutively in thymus, but only transiently in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells.Treponema carateum: Treponema carateum is a species of spirochete bacteria in the genus Treponema.Ichthyosis vulgaris

(1/162) Latex glove allergy among hospital employees: a study in the north-west of England.

The frequency of use and duration of wearing latex gloves among hospital employees has increased due to concerns about AIDS and hepatitis. In many countries there is increased consciousness about latex sensitization. In the UK, the Medical Device Agency has been monitoring latex allergy for a number of years but has not found any conclusive evidence of any significant problem. We report following a detailed questionnaire study in two hospitals in the north-west of England. A total of 1,827 members of staff were questioned about latex allergy at work. One hundred and twenty-four (7%) of these hospital employees had experienced symptoms strongly suggestive of latex allergy. Of this group, 56 had a-RAST test (IgE specific to latex), which was positive in seven (12.5%). There was a history of atopy in 31%, and a family history of atopy in 17% of the individuals. As a result of the study it was found that 17% (21 of the affected individuals) had already changed their working practice by using latex-free gloves. We were able to increase awareness of latex allergy within the hospitals. Both individuals and health care organizations need to be aware of the problem and hospital organizations should encourage staff to seek guidance to address the problem and, if necessary, to take appropriate measures to improve working practices. Practical guidelines are given with regard to identifying the problem and glove use for hospital staff.  (+info)

(2/162) Irritant contact dermatitis due to 1-bromo-3-chloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin in a hydrotherapy pool. Risk assessments: the need for continuous evidence-based assessments.

A physiotherapist working in hydrotherapy presented to occupational health with irritant contact dermatitis. Subsequent investigation revealed that the likely causative agent was 1-bromo 3-chloro 5,5 dimethylhydantoin which was used to disinfect the hydrotherapy pool. A COSHH risk assessment had been performed which failed to take full account of current knowledge and this agent had been introduced into the workplace. The development of adverse health effects among staff and other pool users lead to a review of this risk assessment and eventually a return to less hazardous chlorine-based disinfection. Had an evidence-based approach been combined with an appropriate COSHH assessment prior to and following changes in the workplace then unnecessary risk to employees would not have occurred.  (+info)

(3/162) Repeated hand urticaria due to contact with fishfood.

BACKGROUND: The etiology of urticaria is often difficult to determine. However, in case of repeated circumstance-connected urticaria, the reason may be easily clarifyable. CASE: A 51-year-old healthy woman repeatedly experienced occupational hand urticaria when handling fish food. An unexpected reason for the urticaria was found in that the fishfood contained histamine as a "contaminant". CONCLUSIONS: In fishfood batches, biological degradation can produce histamine and possibly other toxic substances that can lead to occupational health problems.  (+info)

(4/162) Is occupational dermatitis being taken seriously by UK industries?

Occupational dermatitis is a considerable burden but little is documented concerning industry response to this. A postal questionnaire survey of 1,100 UK companies was conducted to investigate skin care provision. The response rate was 51%. The person primarily responsible for health and safety had a professional qualification in only 34% of responding companies. In all, 75% of companies responded that they were required to conduct COSHH risk assessments and, of these, 71% mentioned skin hazards. Only 27% of companies had a skin care policy but 71% had procedures requiring glove use. Seventy-seven per cent of companies did not conduct regular skin checks. Twenty-six per cent had either been aware of a skin problem in the workforce in the last 12 months or had had to modify work practices. Improvement of skin care in UK industry could be facilitated by the establishment of a minimum recommended training qualification; assistance with compliance with COSHH legislation; and guidelines to design and implement a skin policy, provide worker protection and detect skin problems.  (+info)

(5/162) Occupational induction of hypersensitivity after an accidental exposure to chloromethylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone (CMI/MI) in an industrial worker.

A process worker in a paper chemical plant developed an immediate local dermal irritation and delayed bullous dermatitis due to induction of hypersensitivity following an accidental exposure to chloromethylisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone (CMI/MI) biocide. Contact allergy to the isothiazolinone mixture was confirmed by skin patch testing. The dermatitis healed in four weeks, and the worker was advised to avoid all CMI/MI containing products. In a one-year follow-up he did not present with any further skin symptoms. Preventive measures are important for avoiding induction of hypersensitivity to concentrated CMI/MI solutions in industrial workers.  (+info)

(6/162) Risk of hand dermatitis among hairdressers versus office workers.

OBJECTIVES: The risk of irritant skin damage associated with hairdressing was estimated with the individual occupational exposure and other relevant factors having been taken into consideration. METHODS: A cohort of 2352 hairdressing and 111 office apprentices was prospectively followed for the duration of their vocational training (3 years), 3 examinations having been made and 3 years of recruitment having been used [1992 (hairdressers only), 1993, 1994] in 15 vocational training schools in northwest Germany. The information of the final follow-up examination was used for the analysis. RESULTS: A multifactorial analysis taking several (constitutional) risk factors, which were unevenly distributed between the 2 groups, into account revealed a significantly increased risk for hairdressers when compared with office workers (odds ratio approximately 4.0) with a marked decline in the most recently recruited (1994) apprentice group. Other significant factors increasing the dermatitis risk were (i) low ambient absolute humidity, (ii) young age, and (iii) a certain higher range of "atopy score". If the individual profile of occupational exposure among hairdressers was also considered, unprotected wet work of more than 2 hours per day was found to be a significant risk factor. CONCLUSIONS: Good skin protection, as operationalized in the present study, can diminish, but not eliminate, the risk of occupational irritant hand dermatitis among hairdressers.  (+info)

(7/162) Exposure to preservatives used in the industrial pre-treatment of timber.

OBJECTIVE: The research was to survey potential dermal exposure and inhalation exposure of operators to preservative fluids used in industrial timber pre-treatment. RESULTS: Surveys in 1996-98 produced 64 data points. These were taken from 54 sites, and involved 57 timber pre-treatment process operators. Of the data, 38 related to copper chromium arsenic preservative used in vacuum-pressure processes, 19 to solvent-based preservative in double vacuum processes and 7 to water-based preservative in double vacuum processes. Treatment cycle times, preservative concentrations, treatment load sizes and quantities of preservative used per cubic metre of timber are reported. Preservative deposition patterns were similar for all treatments, with about 90% on the legs, and most of the remainder on the arms and chest. The results are quoted as mg preservative preparation (as opposed to active substance), expressed as mg per treatment cycle and mg per minute. Water-based products in vacuum-pressure processes (38 data) showed potential dermal exposure in the range 547-132,000 mg per cycle with a median value 3960 mg per cycle (median cycle time 3 h). Water-based products in double vacuum processes (7 data) showed a range 59-8750 mg per cycle with a median value 4260 mg per cycle; and solvent-based products in double vacuum processes (19 data) showed a range 7.5-449 mg per cycle with a median value 119 mg per cycle (median cycle time 1 h for double-vacuum processes). Contamination of work clothing occurred in nearly all surveys, with around 10% penetration of the preservative as estimated by a sampling patch mounted inside the operator's coveralls. Contamination was measured inside the operator's gloves in nearly all surveys. Wearing fresh gloves was found to reduce exposure to arsenic by 71% and to permethrin by 37%. Contamination on socks was measured and found to be less frequent for double vacuum than for vacuum-pressure processes. Exposure by inhalation for vacuum-pressure processes expressed as preservative, showed a range of 0.06-7.96 mg/m3, with a median value of 1.07 mg/m3, time-weighted average exposure over one or two treatment cycles. Exposure was detected in 68% of the vacuum-pressure process surveys. There was evidence for aerosol generation on transporting timber treated with water-based preservative. For double vacuum processes, two non-zero results only were found, both for water-based preservatives. Aerosols within treatment vessels were found to have dispersed 2.5 min after opening the door. Pilotstudy biological monitoring data for urinary chromium, arsenic, and permethrin metabolites are quoted with reference to creatinine. There are tentative conclusions relating to up take via the skin.  (+info)

(8/162) Biocompatibility of resin-modified filling materials.

Increasing numbers of resin-based dental restorations have been placed over the past decade. During this same period, the public interest in the local and especially systemic adverse effects caused by dental materials has increased significantly. It has been found that each resin-based material releases several components into the oral environment. In particular, the comonomer, triethyleneglycol di-methacrylate (TEGDMA), and the 'hydrophilic' monomer, 2-hydroxy-ethyl-methacrylate (HEMA), are leached out from various composite resins and 'adhesive' materials (e.g., resin-modified glass-ionomer cements [GICs] and dentin adhesives) in considerable amounts during the first 24 hours after polymerization. Numerous unbound resin components may leach into saliva during the initial phase after polymerization, and later, due to degradation or erosion of the resinous restoration. Those substances may be systemically distributed and could potentially cause adverse systemic effects in patients. In addition, absorption of organic substances from unpolymerized material, through unprotected skin, due to manual contact may pose a special risk for dental personnel. This is borne out by the increasing numbers of dental nurses, technicians, and dentists who present with allergic reactions to one or more resin components, like HEMA, glutaraldehyde, ethyleneglycol di-methacrylate (EGDMA), and dibenzoyl peroxide (DPO). However, it must be emphasized that, except for conventional composite resins, data reported on the release of substances from resin-based materials are scarce. There is very little reliable information with respect to the biological interactions between resin components and various tissues. Those interactions may be either protective, like absorption to dentin, or detrimental, e.g., inflammatory reactions of soft tissues. Microbial effects have also been observed which may contribute indirectly to caries and irritation of the pulp. Therefore, it is critical, both for our patients and for the profession, that the biological effects of resin-based filling materials be clarified in the near future.  (+info)


Atopic


  • Patients with atopic dermatitis do not usually require emergency therapy, but they may visit the emergency department for treatment of acute flares caused by eczema herpeticum and bacterial infections. (wflongmd.com)
  • A questionnaire was administered to collect demographic data, home environment, family disease histories, and information about atopic symptoms including early-onset transient wheezing, atopic dermatitis, and eczema, diagnosed by paediatricians. (lww.com)
  • Atopic dermatitis is a long-term (chronic) skin disorder that involves scaly and itchy rashes. (coordinatedhealth.com)
  • Atopic dermatitis is due to a skin reaction (similar to an allergy ) in the skin. (coordinatedhealth.com)
  • Atopic dermatitis is most common in infants. (coordinatedhealth.com)
  • People with atopic dermatitis often have asthma or seasonal allergies. (coordinatedhealth.com)
  • People with atopic dermatitis often test positive to allergy skin tests.However, atopic dermatitis is not caused by allergies. (coordinatedhealth.com)
  • Atopic dermatitis is often called the "itch that rashes" because the itching starts, and then the skin rash follows as a result of scratching. (coordinatedhealth.com)
  • At this time, allergy shots are not used to treat atopic dermatitis. (coordinatedhealth.com)
  • Willingness to pay and quality of life in patients with atopic dermatitis. (jove.com)


eczema


  • Cost-of-illness analysis of patients with chronic hand eczema in routine care in Germany: focus on the impact of occupational disease. (jove.com)


allergic


  • The peripheral mechanisms of inflammatory itch and pain will be studied in a mouse model of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in humans. (grantome.com)
  • Although allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a significant clinical problem affecting millions of people worldwide, there are few if any studies of the neuronal basis for the pain and itch associated with the disease. (grantome.com)


exposures


  • Current US Public Health Service guidelines for the management of potential occupational exposures of health care workers to HIV are summarized. (aappublications.org)


asthma


  • Ten to 17 percent of health care workers have already become sensitized, and over 2 percent have occupational asthma as a result of latex exposure. (aafp.org)
  • Workers in the latex manufacturing industry are also at risk, with one glove manufacturing plant reporting a 3.7 percent prevalence of occupational asthma caused by latex allergy among its employees, based on positive results of skin prick testing and spirometric data. (aafp.org)
  • Inhalation of these fumes can aggravate existing asthma or lead to new onset asthma, and can cause irritation of the upper respiratory tract and the eyes, and dermatitis can result from skin contact. (constantcontact.com)


1101


  • HEALTH HAZARD ALERT Division of Occupational Safety and Health N.C. Department of Labor 1101 Mail Service Center Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-1101 Cherie K. Berry Commissioner 1-Bromopropane (n-Propyl Bromide) 1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is a new solvent that is effective in dissolving fats, waxes and resins. (ncdcr.gov)
  • To obtain additional copies of this book, or if you have questions about N. C. occupational safety and health standards or rules, please contact: N. C. Department of Labor Bureau of Education, Training and Technical Assistance 1101 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC 27699- 1101 Phone: ( 919) 807- 2875 or 1- 800- NC- LABOR ( 1- 800- 625- 2267) ____________________ Additional sources of information are listed on the inside back cover of this book. (ncdcr.gov)


skin


  • Like other organic solvents, the liquid can dissolve the natural protective oils on skin and cause dermatitis (dry, rough, red, cracked skin). (ncdcr.gov)
  • Skin diseases dermatitis and ulcers. (docplayer.net)
  • Skin contact may aggravate an existing dermatitis. (docplayer.net)


health


  • 127 2011 Infection Prevention & Control Manual 1 Occupational Health Program ealth care workers who provide direct services to or who work in the vicinity of persons who may be ill, are at increased risk for acquiring and transmitting infectious diseases. (ok.gov)
  • Because the health and safety of Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) employees is of utmost concern for the agency, an active Occupational Health Program is in place. (ok.gov)
  • The N.C. Department of Labor's Division of Occupational Safety and Health (OSH), is very concerned about the health effects of 1-bromopropane. (ncdcr.gov)
  • explores factors that pose work-related risks, estimates the high costs of these occupational injuries and illnesses, and identifies areas for potential safety and health interventions. (constantcontact.com)
  • In North Carolina, the N. C. Department of Labor enforces the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act. (ncdcr.gov)
  • NCDOL offers many educational programs to the public and produces publications to help inform people about their rights and responsibilities regarding occupational safety and health. (ncdcr.gov)
  • Cherie K. Berry Commissioner of Labor v Introduction The Occupational Safety and Health Act of North Carolina ( OSHANC) holds the employer responsible for the safety and health of its employees. (ncdcr.gov)
  • These standards are published, in part, under the title North Carolina Occupational Safety and Health Standards for General Industry and will be referred to in this guide as OSHNC standards or simply as standards. (ncdcr.gov)
  • This guide also contains information provided by U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. (ncdcr.gov)
  • In North Carolina, state inspectors enforce the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act ( OSHA) through a state plan approved by the U. S. Department of Labor. (ncdcr.gov)
  • The N. C. Department of Labor's Division of Occupational Safety and Health is charged with this mission. (ncdcr.gov)
  • Reading and understanding A Guide to Machine Safeguarding will help you form a sound occupational safety and health policy where you work. (ncdcr.gov)


allergies


  • Hair help the potato can can cause shampoo uncarpeted allergies clean basically an occupational disease. (blogspot.com)


disease


  • ACD is a significant clinical problem and a major occupational disease affecting millions of people worldwide each year and seriously impacting their quality of life. (grantome.com)


important


  • The contact dermatitis occurs due to that important meeting, or enjoying a vacation with your family. (blogspot.com)


How much science do occupational therapists actually need to know?


  • How much science do occupational therapists actually need to know? I am interested in OT, but hate science and have a hard time comprehending it. Will I need to do a lot of science to become an OT?
  • Occupational therapy programs contain a lot of science, also tons of anatomy and physiology. You must know every aspect of the human body and how it works. Its a tough program, but you can do it if you really want it. Best of luck to you.


What is the best treatment for seborrheic dermatitis?


  • I have severe seborrheic dermatitis (scalp) and I have tried everything over the counter and nothing works. I finally went to the dermatologist 2 weeks ago and he prescribed Loprox shampoo, and it has made my hair even more itchy and scaly! I called the office to get them to change my prescription and he said to give it more time. Is it supposed to get worse before it gets better? What are you prescribed to? Thank you!
  • i went to a dremotologist and they to me to use a shampoo with zinc or syclic acid...and they also gave me a foam for hair i guess,....and then two other things for my face personally i dont think it should get worse i mean it shoud kindof take time to like work but yeh...aslso if it says on the lable stop use if condtion worsens then that could also be an indiccator....also when i had it i also look at my diet and really changed it....i think u should read article about subboric dermatitis...thats what did and tahts why when i went to my dermatologist i knew what to ask and stuff i have had my bad days where it seems like i have really dry skin ...hope u feel better:)


Does anyone have any suggestion or remadies for dermatitis which is non steriod and non quarterzone?


  • Any ideas for dermatitis treatments on hands, groin, chest and legs. It is very itchy and very red. Currently been using a dermatitis soap. Unfortunatly due tom server allergies to steriods and quarterzone these cannot be used. Anyone have any other treatments to help get it under wraps.
  • I know my friend had a mild case of dermatitis on the edges of her face, and i also was believed to have dematitis which turned out to be a infection [so not much of help] But when my friend and i had in her case dermatitis we were told to use Cetaphil, which I know is a Cleansing Product. It is perfect for sensitive skin, and a believe it does not contain steriod or quaterzone. Here is the indgredient list; Ingredients: Purified Water, PEG-200 Hydrogenated Glyceryl Palmate (and) PEG-7 Glyceryl Cocoate, Sodium Lauroyl Sarcosinate, Acrylates/Steareth-20 Methacrylate Copolymer, Glycerin, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Butylene Glycol, Phenoxyethanol, Masking Fragrance, Panthenol, PEG-60 Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Disodium EDTA, Methylparaben. Although, this may not be strong enough for a severe case of dermatitis, i know it worked for my friend [Wash face with it morning and night until it clears up]. As for me, now i keep it at hand for make-up removal ;). Extra handy for that time you accidently miss with your eyeliner and draw a huge line down your face >.>. I don't know whether Cetaphil is available internationally, but i live in australia so yeah...


What is the field of occupational therapy like?


  • I am considering working as an occupational therapy and I would like to know some more information about the field. I have read the occupational outlook handbook, but I feel like the description of it is really broad. I would love to hear any personal stories if anyone would like to share. For therapists, what kind of work do you do with your patients? For patients, what was your therapy like? What activities did you do for what?
  • I starred because I'm also interested in going into the field of occupational therapy and would like to learn more about it. I hope you don't mind! Take care. :)


What is the best bodywash/shampoo for someone with contact dermatitis?


  • I've developed a horrible case of allergic/mechanical contact dermatitis. Any contact with soaps or solvents causes my hands to swell, dry, and crack. I tried using soaps and shampoos for sensitive skin but that didn't even work. Any ideas?
  • Try diluted baby shampoo. Get one of those foaming baby shampoos. Most of them only have about 1-2 tablespoons of detergent ingredients per bottle, the rest is water. Best wishes with your condition though, because contact dermatitis is general caused by whatever you are allergic to having already been absorbed into your skin... it won't quit until the allergic substance you have already been exposed to degrades enough to quit bothering you-- and you stop exposing yourself to the problem. In the meantime, you might try some Benedryl gel and/or an aloe vera lotion.


What does it take to become an occupational therapist?


  • I graduated with a BS in Media Studies but I'm thinking of becoming an occupational therapist. Most schools consider this a major. Has anyone gone down this road and how much work/how long do you think it will take to get certified?
  • Step 1In order to apply to a graduate program in occupational therapy, first you need to earn a bachelor degree.If you are still in college, you may start to take science courses, like chemistry, biology, anatomy, psychology.English and speech courses can be very helpful, because as a occupational therapist you will work with people and you need to have excellent communicational skills.Try to maintain a high GPA as almost all occupational therapy programs require an at least 3.0 general GPA and 3.5 GPA in science courses. Step 2While still in college or after that try to volunteer or even work in a healthcare environment.During this time, try to obtain at least two recommendation letters, because you will need them in the application process.Occupational therapy programs give priority to people with degrees or experience in the healthcare field in the admission process ,so the best combination would be to have a degree in healthcare (for example nursing) and some work experience when you apply. Step 3Once admitted in the program, keep in mind that the academic schedule can be quite intensive, and you might not be able to work fulltime in order to keep up.Occupational therapy programs can be completed in 2 and a half years to 3 years full time (75-80 credits).In addition to classroom work, students must complete an equivalent of 24 weeks of supervised experience working with clients. Step 4Once you finished your masters or doctoral degree and your supervised work, there is one more step before you can actually work as a occupational therapist: certification.To be certified, you need to take and pass the NBCOT exam.After passing this exam you will be given the designation Registered Occupational Therapist and you can put the initials OTR after your name.


How can you tell the difference between Seborrheic dermatitis and just having dry skin or dry scalp??


  • Im not sure if i just have dry skin an scalp or is it Seborrheic dermatitis i just lookin to know the difference between the two thanks.
  • Dermatitis in very mild cases is hard to tell the difference especially on the scalp. If you are experiencing any crusting over, or weeping of fluid in the affected areas, then you definitely have dermatitis. FlakeFree therapeutic lotion formulated with zinc will clear your skin up. FlakeFree therapeutic hair gel formulated with zinc, tea tree oil, and numerous herbal ingredients will clear your scalp. I know, I used to suffer from dermatitis for years. I have remained clear now for several years since I started using the FlakeFree products. P.S. They are also excellent for dry skin and scalp, dandruff, and numerous skin and scalp issues. Check out my site for further details.


What is your understanding of occupational health and safety?


  • What is your understanding of occupational health and safety? (Tell me what you know about safety in the workplace
  • Hey Vlad Well Occupational Health and Safety is quite often occupation specific. If you're a builder for example, you'll need to learn about things such as correct lifting procedures, using safety switches on tools and appliances, lifting objects in teams, working at heights etc, whereas a nurse will have training in areas such as aggressive patient management, correct techniques in disposing of biological waste, hand washing etc and an office worker would having training in correct posture in their chair at work, keeping cords out of foot ways etc. There are some basic occupational health and safety features that apply to all job specifications, most likely to do with lifting and keeping the place of employment safe for all workers. Most of them are about working in a team and knowing the correct evacuation procedures and at all times, having someone who is first aid trained on site. Is there something specific you wish to know? You can study to be an occupational health and safety advisor / inspector in australia. You can do this as a tafe course meaning you can train people in occupational health and safety and also inspect worksites by working for work safe or a similar organisation.