Analgesia: Methods of PAIN relief that may be used with or in place of ANALGESICS.Analgesia, Epidural: The relief of pain without loss of consciousness through the introduction of an analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. It is differentiated from ANESTHESIA, EPIDURAL which refers to the state of insensitivity to sensation.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Analgesia, Obstetrical: The elimination of PAIN, without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS, during OBSTETRIC LABOR; OBSTETRIC DELIVERY; or the POSTPARTUM PERIOD, usually through the administration of ANALGESICS.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Anesthesia, Epidural: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the epidural space.Anesthesia, Spinal: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.Analgesia, Patient-Controlled: Relief of PAIN, without loss of CONSCIOUSNESS, through ANALGESIC AGENTS administered by the patients. It has been used successfully to control POSTOPERATIVE PAIN, during OBSTETRIC LABOR, after BURNS, and in TERMINAL CARE. The choice of agent, dose, and lockout interval greatly influence effectiveness. The potential for overdose can be minimized by combining small bolus doses with a mandatory interval between successive doses (lockout interval).Anesthesia, Conduction: Injection of an anesthetic into the nerves to inhibit nerve transmission in a specific part of the body.Anesthesia, Inhalation: Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.Anesthesia, Intravenous: Process of administering an anesthetic through injection directly into the bloodstream.Anesthesia, Obstetrical: A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.Analgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Bupivacaine: A widely used local anesthetic agent.Anesthesia Recovery Period: The period of emergence from general anesthesia, where different elements of consciousness return at different rates.Fentanyl: A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Morphine: The principal alkaloid in opium and the prototype opiate analgesic and narcotic. Morphine has widespread effects in the central nervous system and on smooth muscle.Adjuvants, Anesthesia: Agents that are administered in association with anesthetics to increase effectiveness, improve delivery, or decrease required dosage.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Anesthetics, Intravenous: Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)Anesthetics, Inhalation: Gases or volatile liquids that vary in the rate at which they induce anesthesia; potency; the degree of circulation, respiratory, or neuromuscular depression they produce; and analgesic effects. Inhalation anesthetics have advantages over intravenous agents in that the depth of anesthesia can be changed rapidly by altering the inhaled concentration. Because of their rapid elimination, any postoperative respiratory depression is of relatively short duration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p173)Anesthetics, Combined: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially to induce anesthesia. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Propofol: An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.Acupuncture Analgesia: Analgesia produced by the insertion of ACUPUNCTURE needles at certain ACUPUNCTURE POINTS on the body. This activates small myelinated nerve fibers in the muscle which transmit impulses to the spinal cord and then activate three centers - the spinal cord, midbrain and pituitary/hypothalamus - to produce analgesia.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Lidocaine: A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.Nitrous Oxide: Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.Sufentanil: An opioid analgesic that is used as an adjunct in anesthesia, in balanced anesthesia, and as a primary anesthetic agent.Methyl Ethers: A group of compounds that contain the general formula R-OCH3.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Isoflurane: A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.Meperidine: A narcotic analgesic that can be used for the relief of most types of moderate to severe pain, including postoperative pain and the pain of labor. Prolonged use may lead to dependence of the morphine type; withdrawal symptoms appear more rapidly than with morphine and are of shorter duration.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Ketamine: A cyclohexanone derivative used for induction of anesthesia. Its mechanism of action is not well understood, but ketamine can block NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) and may interact with sigma receptors.Anesthesia, Caudal: Epidural anesthesia administered via the sacral canal.Anesthetics: Agents that are capable of inducing a total or partial loss of sensation, especially tactile sensation and pain. They may act to induce general ANESTHESIA, in which an unconscious state is achieved, or may act locally to induce numbness or lack of sensation at a targeted site.Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Labor Pain: Pain associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR in CHILDBIRTH. It is caused primarily by UTERINE CONTRACTION as well as pressure on the CERVIX; BLADDER; and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Labor pain mostly occurs in the ABDOMEN; the GROIN; and the BACK.Conscious Sedation: A drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Injections, Spinal: Introduction of therapeutic agents into the spinal region using a needle and syringe.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Halothane: A nonflammable, halogenated, hydrocarbon anesthetic that provides relatively rapid induction with little or no excitement. Analgesia may not be adequate. NITROUS OXIDE is often given concomitantly. Because halothane may not produce sufficient muscle relaxation, supplemental neuromuscular blocking agents may be required. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p178)Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: Emesis and queasiness occurring after anesthesia.Preanesthetic Medication: Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.Amides: Organic compounds containing the -CO-NH2 radical. Amides are derived from acids by replacement of -OH by -NH2 or from ammonia by the replacement of H by an acyl group. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Anesthesia and Analgesia: Medical methods of either relieving pain caused by a particular condition or removing the sensation of pain during a surgery or other medical procedure.Labor, Obstetric: The repetitive uterine contraction during childbirth which is associated with the progressive dilation of the uterine cervix (CERVIX UTERI). Successful labor results in the expulsion of the FETUS and PLACENTA. Obstetric labor can be spontaneous or induced (LABOR, INDUCED).Anesthetics, Dissociative: Intravenous anesthetics that induce a state of sedation, immobility, amnesia, and marked analgesia. Subjects may experience a strong feeling of dissociation from the environment. The condition produced is similar to NEUROLEPTANALGESIA, but is brought about by the administration of a single drug. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed)Tramadol: A narcotic analgesic proposed for severe pain. It may be habituating.Hypnotics and Sedatives: Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.Alfentanil: A short-acting opioid anesthetic and analgesic derivative of FENTANYL. It produces an early peak analgesic effect and fast recovery of consciousness. Alfentanil is effective as an anesthetic during surgery, for supplementation of analgesia during surgical procedures, and as an analgesic for critically ill patients.Anesthesia, Closed-Circuit: Inhalation anesthesia where the gases exhaled by the patient are rebreathed as some carbon dioxide is simultaneously removed and anesthetic gas and oxygen are added so that no anesthetic escapes into the room. Closed-circuit anesthesia is used especially with explosive anesthetics to prevent fires where electrical sparking from instruments is possible.Mepivacaine: A local anesthetic that is chemically related to BUPIVACAINE but pharmacologically related to LIDOCAINE. It is indicated for infiltration, nerve block, and epidural anesthesia. Mepivacaine is effective topically only in large doses and therefore should not be used by this route. (From AMA Drug Evaluations, 1994, p168)Anesthetics, General: Agents that induce various degrees of analgesia; depression of consciousness, circulation, and respiration; relaxation of skeletal muscle; reduction of reflex activity; and amnesia. There are two types of general anesthetics, inhalation and intravenous. With either type, the arterial concentration of drug required to induce anesthesia varies with the condition of the patient, the desired depth of anesthesia, and the concomitant use of other drugs. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p.173)Thiopental: A barbiturate that is administered intravenously for the induction of general anesthesia or for the production of complete anesthesia of short duration.Analgesics, Non-Narcotic: A subclass of analgesic agents that typically do not bind to OPIOID RECEPTORS and are not addictive. Many non-narcotic analgesics are offered as NONPRESCRIPTION DRUGS.Prilocaine: A local anesthetic that is similar pharmacologically to LIDOCAINE. Currently, it is used most often for infiltration anesthesia in dentistry.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Anesthesia Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration of functions and activities pertaining to the delivery of anesthetics.Xylazine: An adrenergic alpha-2 agonist used as a sedative, analgesic and centrally acting muscle relaxant in VETERINARY MEDICINE.Pentobarbital: A short-acting barbiturate that is effective as a sedative and hypnotic (but not as an anti-anxiety) agent and is usually given orally. It is prescribed more frequently for sleep induction than for sedation but, like similar agents, may lose its effectiveness by the second week of continued administration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p236)Naloxone: A specific opiate antagonist that has no agonist activity. It is a competitive antagonist at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors.Enflurane: An extremely stable inhalation anesthetic that allows rapid adjustments of anesthesia depth with little change in pulse or respiratory rate.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Pain Threshold: Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Ketorolac: A pyrrolizine carboxylic acid derivative structurally related to INDOMETHACIN. It is an NSAID and is used principally for its analgesic activity. (From Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Piperidines: A family of hexahydropyridines.Clonidine: An imidazoline sympatholytic agent that stimulates ALPHA-2 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS and central IMIDAZOLINE RECEPTORS. It is commonly used in the management of HYPERTENSION.Femoral Nerve: A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.Interpleural Analgesia: Injection of ANALGESICS; LOCAL ANESTHETICS; or NARCOTICS into the PLEURAL CAVITY between the two pleural membranes.Midazolam: A short-acting hypnotic-sedative drug with anxiolytic and amnestic properties. It is used in dentistry, cardiac surgery, endoscopic procedures, as preanesthetic medication, and as an adjunct to local anesthesia. The short duration and cardiorespiratory stability makes it useful in poor-risk, elderly, and cardiac patients. It is water-soluble at pH less than 4 and lipid-soluble at physiological pH.Drug Tolerance: Progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, resulting from its continued administration. It should be differentiated from DRUG RESISTANCE wherein an organism, disease, or tissue fails to respond to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should also be differentiated from MAXIMUM TOLERATED DOSE and NO-OBSERVED-ADVERSE-EFFECT LEVEL.Anesthesia, IntratrachealBrachial Plexus: The large network of nerve fibers which distributes the innervation of the upper extremity. The brachial plexus extends from the neck into the axilla. In humans, the nerves of the plexus usually originate from the lower cervical and the first thoracic spinal cord segments (C5-C8 and T1), but variations are not uncommon.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Receptors, Opioid, mu: A class of opioid receptors recognized by its pharmacological profile. Mu opioid receptors bind, in decreasing order of affinity, endorphins, dynorphins, met-enkephalin, and leu-enkephalin. They have also been shown to be molecular receptors for morphine.Labor Stage, First: Period from the onset of true OBSTETRIC LABOR to the complete dilatation of the CERVIX UTERI.Dexmedetomidine: A imidazole derivative that is an agonist of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS. It is closely-related to MEDETOMIDINE, which is the racemic form of this compound.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Pirinitramide: A diphenylpropylamine with intense narcotic analgesic activity of long duration. It is a derivative of MEPERIDINE with similar activity and usage.Hydromorphone: An opioid analgesic made from MORPHINE and used mainly as an analgesic. It has a shorter duration of action than morphine.Pain Management: A form of therapy that employs a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those experiencing pain.Butorphanol: A synthetic morphinan analgesic with narcotic antagonist action. It is used in the management of severe pain.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Surgical Procedures, Minor: Surgery restricted to the management of minor problems and injuries; surgical procedures of relatively slight extent and not in itself hazardous to life. (Dorland, 28th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Nalbuphine: A narcotic used as a pain medication. It appears to be an agonist at kappa opioid receptors and an antagonist or partial agonist at mu opioid receptors.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Methohexital: An intravenous anesthetic with a short duration of action that may be used for induction of anesthesia.Receptors, Opioid: Cell membrane proteins that bind opioids and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The endogenous ligands for opioid receptors in mammals include three families of peptides, the enkephalins, endorphins, and dynorphins. The receptor classes include mu, delta, and kappa receptors. Sigma receptors bind several psychoactive substances, including certain opioids, but their endogenous ligands are not known.Medetomidine: An agonist of RECEPTORS, ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 that is used in veterinary medicine for its analgesic and sedative properties. It is the racemate of DEXMEDETOMIDINE.Narcotic Antagonists: Agents inhibiting the effect of narcotics on the central nervous system.Perioperative Care: Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.Ketoprofen: An IBUPROFEN-type anti-inflammatory analgesic and antipyretic. It is used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.Hysterectomy: Excision of the uterus.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Intraoperative Care: Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.Electroacupuncture: A form of acupuncture with electrical impulses passing through the needles to stimulate NERVE TISSUE. It can be used for ANALGESIA; ANESTHESIA; REHABILITATION; and treatment for diseases.Droperidol: A butyrophenone with general properties similar to those of HALOPERIDOL. It is used in conjunction with an opioid analgesic such as FENTANYL to maintain the patient in a calm state of neuroleptanalgesia with indifference to surroundings but still able to cooperate with the surgeon. It is also used as a premedicant, as an antiemetic, and for the control of agitation in acute psychoses. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 29th ed, p593)Hernia, Inguinal: An abdominal hernia with an external bulge in the GROIN region. It can be classified by the location of herniation. Indirect inguinal hernias occur through the internal inguinal ring. Direct inguinal hernias occur through defects in the ABDOMINAL WALL (transversalis fascia) in Hesselbach's triangle. The former type is commonly seen in children and young adults; the latter in adults.Neuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction without causing depolarization of the motor end plate. They prevent acetylcholine from triggering muscle contraction and are used as muscle relaxants during electroshock treatments, in convulsive states, and as anesthesia adjuvants.Deep Sedation: Drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients cannot be easily aroused but respond purposely following repeated painful stimulation. The ability to independently maintain ventilatory function may be impaired. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Pruritus: An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Gynecologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the female genitalia.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.Neostigmine: A cholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of myasthenia gravis and to reverse the effects of muscle relaxants such as gallamine and tubocurarine. Neostigmine, unlike PHYSOSTIGMINE, does not cross the blood-brain barrier.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Xenon: A noble gas with the atomic symbol Xe, atomic number 54, and atomic weight 131.30. It is found in the earth's atmosphere and has been used as an anesthetic.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.EthersSubarachnoid Space: The space between the arachnoid membrane and PIA MATER, filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID. It contains large blood vessels that supply the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Opioid Peptides: The endogenous peptides with opiate-like activity. The three major classes currently recognized are the ENKEPHALINS, the DYNORPHINS, and the ENDORPHINS. Each of these families derives from different precursors, proenkephalin, prodynorphin, and PRO-OPIOMELANOCORTIN, respectively. There are also at least three classes of OPIOID RECEPTORS, but the peptide families do not map to the receptors in a simple way.Hyperalgesia: An increased sensation of pain or discomfort produced by mimimally noxious stimuli due to damage to soft tissue containing NOCICEPTORS or injury to a peripheral nerve.Hypotension: Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.Neuromuscular Blockade: The intentional interruption of transmission at the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION by external agents, usually neuromuscular blocking agents. It is distinguished from NERVE BLOCK in which nerve conduction (NEURAL CONDUCTION) is interrupted rather than neuromuscular transmission. Neuromuscular blockade is commonly used to produce MUSCLE RELAXATION as an adjunct to anesthesia during surgery and other medical procedures. It is also often used as an experimental manipulation in basic research. It is not strictly speaking anesthesia but is grouped here with anesthetic techniques. The failure of neuromuscular transmission as a result of pathological processes is not included here.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Carticaine: A thiophene-containing local anesthetic pharmacologically similar to MEPIVACAINE.Ether: A mobile, very volatile, highly flammable liquid used as an inhalation anesthetic and as a solvent for waxes, fats, oils, perfumes, alkaloids, and gums. It is mildly irritating to skin and mucous membranes.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Apgar Score: A method, developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar, to evaluate a newborn's adjustment to extrauterine life. Five items - heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color - are evaluated 60 seconds after birth and again five minutes later on a scale from 0-2, 0 being the lowest, 2 being normal. The five numbers are added for the Apgar score. A score of 0-3 represents severe distress, 4-7 indicates moderate distress, and a score of 7-10 predicts an absence of difficulty in adjusting to extrauterine life.Injections, Epidural: The injection of drugs, most often analgesics, into the spinal canal without puncturing the dura mater.Pentazocine: The first mixed agonist-antagonist analgesic to be marketed. It is an agonist at the kappa and sigma opioid receptors and has a weak antagonist action at the mu receptor. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1991, p97)Premedication: Preliminary administration of a drug preceding a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure. The commonest types of premedication are antibiotics (ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS) and anti-anxiety agents. It does not include PREANESTHETIC MEDICATION.Chloralose: A derivative of CHLORAL HYDRATE that was used as a sedative but has been replaced by safer and more effective drugs. Its most common use is as a general anesthetic in animal experiments.Placebo Effect: An effect usually, but not necessarily, beneficial that is attributable to an expectation that the regimen will have an effect, i.e., the effect is due to the power of suggestion.Morphine Derivatives: Analogs or derivatives of morphine.Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Needles: Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.Consciousness Monitors: Devices used to assess the level of consciousness especially during anesthesia. They measure brain activity level based on the EEG.Acetaminophen: Analgesic antipyretic derivative of acetanilide. It has weak anti-inflammatory properties and is used as a common analgesic, but may cause liver, blood cell, and kidney damage.Laryngeal Masks: A type of oropharyngeal airway that provides an alternative to endotracheal intubation and standard mask anesthesia in certain patients. It is introduced into the hypopharynx to form a seal around the larynx thus permitting spontaneous or positive pressure ventilation without penetration of the larynx or esophagus. It is used in place of a facemask in routine anesthesia. The advantages over standard mask anesthesia are better airway control, minimal anesthetic gas leakage, a secure airway during patient transport to the recovery area, and minimal postoperative problems.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Periaqueductal Gray: Central gray matter surrounding the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT in the MESENCEPHALON. Physiologically it is probably involved in RAGE reactions, the LORDOSIS REFLEX; FEEDING responses, bladder tonus, and pain.Ephedrine: A phenethylamine found in EPHEDRA SINICA. PSEUDOEPHEDRINE is an isomer. It is an alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonist that may also enhance release of norepinephrine. It has been used for asthma, heart failure, rhinitis, and urinary incontinence, and for its central nervous system stimulatory effects in the treatment of narcolepsy and depression. It has become less extensively used with the advent of more selective agonists.Pain Perception: The process by which PAIN is recognized and interpreted by the brain.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Oxycodone: A semisynthetic derivative of CODEINE.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Infusion Pumps: Fluid propulsion systems driven mechanically, electrically, or osmotically that are used to inject (or infuse) over time agents into a patient or experimental animal; used routinely in hospitals to maintain a patent intravenous line, to administer antineoplastic agents and other drugs in thromboembolism, heart disease, diabetes mellitus (INSULIN INFUSION SYSTEMS is also available), and other disorders.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Adrenergic alpha-Agonists: Drugs that selectively bind to and activate alpha adrenergic receptors.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Narcotics: Agents that induce NARCOSIS. Narcotics include agents that cause somnolence or induced sleep (STUPOR); natural or synthetic derivatives of OPIUM or MORPHINE or any substance that has such effects. They are potent inducers of ANALGESIA and OPIOID-RELATED DISORDERS.Intraoperative Awareness: Occurence of a patient becoming conscious during a procedure performed under GENERAL ANESTHESIA and subsequently having recall of these events. (From Anesthesiology 2006, 104(4): 847-64.)Etomidate: Imidazole derivative anesthetic and hypnotic with little effect on blood gases, ventilation, or the cardiovascular system. It has been proposed as an induction anesthetic.Nociceptors: Peripheral AFFERENT NEURONS which are sensitive to injuries or pain, usually caused by extreme thermal exposures, mechanical forces, or other noxious stimuli. Their cell bodies reside in the DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA. Their peripheral terminals (NERVE ENDINGS) innervate target tissues and transduce noxious stimuli via axons to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Succinylcholine: A quaternary skeletal muscle relaxant usually used in the form of its bromide, chloride, or iodide. It is a depolarizing relaxant, acting in about 30 seconds and with a duration of effect averaging three to five minutes. Succinylcholine is used in surgical, anesthetic, and other procedures in which a brief period of muscle relaxation is called for.Cervical Plexus: A network of nerve fibers originating in the upper four CERVICAL SPINAL CORD segments. The cervical plexus distributes cutaneous nerves to parts of the neck, shoulders, and back of the head. It also distributes motor fibers to muscles of the cervical SPINAL COLUMN, infrahyoid muscles, and the DIAPHRAGM.Shivering: Involuntary contraction or twitching of the muscles. It is a physiologic method of heat production in man and other mammals.Nurse Anesthetists: Professional nurses who have completed postgraduate training in the administration of anesthetics and who function under the responsibility of the operating surgeon.Manuals as Topic: Books designed to give factual information or instructions.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Laryngoscopy: Examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the larynx performed with a specially designed endoscope.Antiemetics: Drugs used to prevent NAUSEA or VOMITING.Tetracaine: A potent local anesthetic of the ester type used for surface and spinal anesthesia.Mandibular Nerve: A branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The mandibular nerve carries motor fibers to the muscles of mastication and sensory fibers to the teeth and gingivae, the face in the region of the mandible, and parts of the dura.Procaine: A local anesthetic of the ester type that has a slow onset and a short duration of action. It is mainly used for infiltration anesthesia, peripheral nerve block, and spinal block. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1016).Pain, Intractable: Persistent pain that is refractory to some or all forms of treatment.Androstanols: Androstanes and androstane derivatives which are substituted in any position with one or more hydroxyl groups.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Autonomic Nerve Block: Interruption of sympathetic pathways, by local injection of an anesthetic agent, at any of four levels: peripheral nerve block, sympathetic ganglion block, extradural block, and subarachnoid block.Hypotension, Controlled: Procedure in which arterial blood pressure is intentionally reduced in order to control blood loss during surgery. This procedure is performed either pharmacologically or by pre-surgical removal of blood.Extraction, Obstetrical: Extraction of the fetus by means of obstetrical instruments.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Tourniquets: Devices for the compression of a blood vessel by application around an extremity to control the circulation and prevent the flow of blood to or from the distal area. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Codeine: An opioid analgesic related to MORPHINE but with less potent analgesic properties and mild sedative effects. It also acts centrally to suppress cough.Hypnosis, Anesthetic: Procedure in which an individual is induced into a trance-like state to relieve pain. This procedure is frequently performed with local but not general ANESTHESIA.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.Opium: The air-dried exudate from the unripe seed capsule of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum, or its variant, P. album. It contains a number of alkaloids, but only a few - MORPHINE; CODEINE; and PAPAVERINE - have clinical significance. Opium has been used as an analgesic, antitussive, antidiarrheal, and antispasmodic.Injections, Intramuscular: Forceful administration into a muscle of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the muscle and any tissue covering it.Administration, Rectal: The insertion of drugs into the rectum, usually for confused or incompetent patients, like children, infants, and the very old or comatose.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Sensation: The process in which specialized SENSORY RECEPTOR CELLS transduce peripheral stimuli (physical or chemical) into NERVE IMPULSES which are then transmitted to the various sensory centers in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.

*  Local and regional anesthesia techniques, Part 4: Epidural anesthesia and analgesia
Local and regional anesthesia techniques, Part 4: Epidural anesthesia ... and analgesia. >> Mobile Site Home of dvm360 magazine ... The Essentials Anesthesia Atopic dermatitis Canine cranial ... Local and regional anesthesia techniques, Part 4: Epidural anesthesia and analgesia. >> Mobile Site Home of dvm360 magazine Veterinary Medicine Veterinary Economics Firstline The CVC Group. CVC. Medicine. Local and regional anesthesia techniques, Part 4: Epidural anesthesia and analgesia Consider this straightforward and economical technique to relieve your patients' pain. In the January, March, and June issues of Veterinary Medicine, we discussed many simple-to-perform anesthesia techniques: infiltration anesthesia; splash blocks; digital nerve blocks; intravenous regional anesthesia; soaker-type catheters; stifle, intercostal, intrapleural, and forelimb blocks; and maxillary and mandibular nerve blocks. The lumbosacral intervertebral space is the most common location for epidural injection in small animals. Locat...
http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/local-and-regional-anesthesia-techniques-part-4-epidural-anesthesia-and-analgesia
*  AFP Documents with MESH term: Anesthetics, Local - American Family Physician
of Office Anesthesia: Part I. Infiltrative Anesthesia - ... use of effective analgesia is vital for any office procedure in ... 100 percent analgesia in a short period of time, works on ... Joint and Soft Tissue Injection - Article ABSTRACT: Injection techniques are helpful for diagnosis and therapy in a wide variety of musculoskeletal conditions. Therapeutic indications include the delivery of local anesthetics for pain relief and the delivery of corticosteroids for suppression of inflammation. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Injection of the Wrist and Hand Region - Article ABSTRACT: Joint injection of the wrist and hand region is a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the family physician. In this article, the injection procedures for carpal tunnel syndrome, de Quervain's tenosynovitis, osteoarthritis of the first carpometacarpal joint, wrist ganglion cysts, and digital flexor tenosynovitis trigger finger are reviewed. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Injection of the Shoulder Region - Article ABSTRACT: Th...
http://aafp.org/afp/viewRelatedDocumentsByMesh.htm?meshId=D000779
*  Anesthesia And Analgesia For Veterinary Technicians, 4E | Rent 9780323055048 | 0323055044
anesthesia and analgesia for veterinary technicians e rent ... books anesthesia and analgesia for veterinary technicians ... e anesthesia and analgesia for veterinary technicians...
https://valorebooks.com/textbooks/anesthesia-and-analgesia-for-veterinary-technicians-4th-edition/9780323055048?display_type=2&nft=1
*  Citation Machine: Anesthesia And Analgesia format citation generator for digital image
Citation Machine: Anesthesia And Analgesia format citation generator ... APA MLA Chicago Anesthesia and Analgesia. Book Magazine. News ... Other. Generate Anesthesia and Analgesia citations for Digital...
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*  EBook Fetal Echocardiography Downloads Free. Download Free EPUB Book Now!
echocardiograms and interpret them. Initial chapters ... of echocardiography and how to obtain the standard views, ... of each standard view and the possible deviations ... Handbook of Fetal Medicine Handbook of Fetal...
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*  VECCS – 2016 International Veterinary Emergency & Critical Care Symposium2016 International Vete
Emergency and Critical Care Society Bylaws. VECCS Ad ... Emergency and Critical Care Society Bylaws. VECCS Ad ... of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia ACVAA , the Academy of...
http://veccs.org/portfolio/2016-iveccs/
*  JoVE Science Search Tool
Disorders And Stroke , Neurological Disorders , ... 11/16/2010 3.3 Anesthesia and analgesia The anticonvulsant ... effects of propofol and a propofol analog, 2,6-diisopropyl-4- 1...
http://labindex.jove.com/author/Baker_MT&author=Baker MT
*  Optimizing Pain and Rehabilitation After Knee Arthroplasty - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
local infiltration analgesia. Official Title: Optimizing Pain and ... Local Infiltration Analgesia. Further study details as provided by ... local infiltration analgesia. Other: local infiltration analgesia...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01616836
*  Navicular Disease: Research Needed to Better Understand | TheHorse.com
to diagnostic analgesia; 3 imaging of the foot; and 4...
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*  MelodySale - Dark Wood
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*  Analgesias: Definition with Analgesias Pictures and Photos
... Definition of Analgesias 1. Noun. plural of analgesia. Source: wiktionary.com Definition of Analgesias 1. Analgesias Pictures. Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Analgesias Images Lexicographical Neighbors of Analgesias analects analemma analemmas analemmata analemmatic analepses analepsis analepsy analept analeptic analeptic enema analeptics analgesia analgesia algera analgesia dolorosa analgesias current term analgesic analgesic nephritis analgesic nephropathy analgesics analgesimeter analgetic analgetics analgia analgias analingus analities analize. Literary usage of Analgesias. Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature: 1. movements—Are they the effects of paint— Pain is only a sign—The analgesias : unconsciousness of pain and intellectual consciousness—Retardation of pain ..." 2. Skin and Venereal Diseases 1904 "With regard to the cause for these degenerations, no discovery ...
http://lexic.us/definition-of/analgesias
*  URMC Research Network - Analgesia, Epidural
... Patients Families. Education. Research. Community. Referring Physicians. Find a Physician. Departments Centers. About URMC. Libraries. Alumni. Giving. URMC Research Network URMC. Research. URMC Research Network. Loading ... New Search. About. FAQ. Find People Keyword. Last Name. More Search Options. Analgesia, Epidural. "Analgesia, Epidural" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH Medical Subject Headings. Descriptors are arranged in a hierarchical structure, which enables searching at various levels of specificity. MeSH information Definition. Details. More General Concepts. Related Concepts. More Specific Concepts The relief of pain without loss of consciousness through the introduction of an analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. It is differentiated from ANESTHESIA, EPIDURAL which refers to the state of insensitivity to sensation. Descriptor ID D015360. MeSH Number s E03.091.080. Concept/Terms Analgesia, Epidural Analgesia, ...
http://urmc.rochester.edu/profiles/display/128436
*  Multimodal Analgesia Versus Routine Care Pain Management - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
... Learn About Clinical Studies. Multimodal Analgesia Versus Routine Care Pain Management MMA This study is currently recruiting participants. Verified November 2013 by Rush University Medical Center Sponsor: Rush University Medical Center Information provided by Responsible Party : Frank M. Phillips, MD, Rush University Medical Center. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01861743 First received: May 8, 2013 Last updated: November 26, 2013 Last verified: November 2013 History of Changes. Most patients undergoing surgery experience significant post-operative pain. The most common post-operative analgesia used in spine surgery is narcotic medication delivered via an intravenous patient controlled analgesia IV PCA. The purpose of this study is to determine if post-operative pain and rate of recovery are improved in patients undergoing spine surgery using MMA compared to usual analgesic care. Other: Multimodal Analgesia Other: Patient controlled analgesia. Official Title: Multimodal Analgesia Versus Routine Care ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01861743?recr=Open&intr=narcotics&rank=9
*  Browsing School of Medicine by Subject "Analgesia"
... Toggle navigation. Login. Toggle navigation. ARAN - Access to Research at NUI Galway. Browsing School of Medicine by Subject. ARAN Home. College of Medicine, Nursing, Health Sciences. School of Medicine. Browsing School of Medicine by Subject. ARAN Home. College of Medicine, Nursing, Health Sciences. School of Medicine. Browsing School of Medicine by Subject. All of ARAN Communities Collections By Issue Date Authors Titles Subjects Types This Community By Issue Date Authors Titles Subjects Types. Browsing School of Medicine by Subject "Analgesia". title issue date submit date. ascending descending. title. issue date. submit date. ascending. descending. The effect of pain on cognitive function: a review of clinical and preclinical research. ; Finn, David P. Cognitive impairment is commonly associated with the pain experience. Here we review clinical ... Finn, David P. Elsevier, 2009. Modulation of Conditioned Fear, Fear-Conditioned Analgesia, and Brain Regional C-Fos Expression Following Administration of...
https://aran.library.nuigalway.ie/xmlui/handle/10379/706/browse?value=Analgesia&type=subject
*  AFP Documents with MESH term: Analgesia - American Family Physician
... Advertisement. Items in AFP with MESH term: Analgesia. Preemptive Analgesia: Decreasing Pain Before It Starts - Editorials. New Concepts In Acute Pain Therapy: Preemptive Analgesia - Article ABSTRACT: Pain, which is often inadequately treated, accompanies the more than 23 million surgical procedures performed each year and may persist long after tissue heals. Preemptive analgesia, an evolving clinical concept, involves the introduction of an analgesic regimen before the onset of noxious stimuli, with the goal of preventing sensitization of the nervous system to subsequent stimuli that could amplify pain. Surgery offers the most promising setting for preemptive analgesia because the timing of noxious stimuli is known. When adequate drug doses are administered to appropriately selected patients before surgery, intravenous opiates, local anesthetic infiltration, nerve block, subarachnoid block and epidural block offer benefits that can be observed as long as one year after surgery. The most effective preemp...
http://aafp.org/afp/viewRelatedDocumentsByMesh.htm?meshId=D000698
*  May 2014 - Volume 118 - Issue 5 : Anesthesia & Analgesia
May 2014 - Volume 118 - Issue 5 : Anesthesia Analgesia. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Anesthesia Analgesia Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. eTOC. Previous Issues. Open Access. About the Journal. About the Society. Rights and Permissions. May 2014 - Volume 118 - Issue 5. Previous Issue. Next Issue. May 2014 - Volume 118 - Issue 5. Table of Contents Outline Subscribe to eTOC View Contributor Index Video Summary. A New Folder Folder Name:. The item s has been successfully added to " ". Email to a Colleague. Your Email:. Message: Thought you might appreciate this item s I saw at Anesthesia Analgesia. Some error has occurred while processing your request. Export to. Add to My Favorites Email to Colleague Export to Citation Manager. View. Title Citation Abstract. Previous of 3 Next. Anesthesia & Analgesia’s Collection on the Perioperative Surgical Home. Shafer, Steven L.; Donovan, John F. Shafer, Steven L.; Donovan, John F. Anesthesia & Analgesia. Free Access. PDF + Favorites Request Permissi...
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*  Infiltration analgesia
... is deposition of an analgesic drug close to the apex of a tooth so that it can diffuse to reach the nerve entering the apical foramina see also regional analgesia local analgesia category analgesics category anesthesia...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infiltration_analgesia
*  Analgesia in Mechanically Ventilated Children: To Each His... : Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
... Enter your Email address:. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Recent Searches. Login. Rights and Permissions. Analgesia in Mechanically Ventilated Children: To Each His... A A You could be reading the full-text of this article now if you... If you have access to this article through your institution, you can view this article in. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: January 2013 - Volume 14 - Issue 1 - p 101–102 doi: 10.1097/PCC.0b013e31825b87d8 Editorials. Analgesia in Mechanically Ventilated Children: To Each His Own?* Parker, Margaret M. MD, FCCM. Source Analgesia in Mechanically Ventilated Children: To Each His Own?* Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. Email to a Colleague. Message: Thought you might appreciate this item s I saw at Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. Login Login with your LWW Journals username and password. Login with your LWW Journals username and password. Username or Email:. Password:. Password Sent. Link...
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*  October 2015 - Volume 121 - Issue 4 - Contributor Index : Anesthesia & Analgesia
October 2015 - Volume 121 - Issue 4 - Contributor Index : Anesthesia Analgesia. Enter your Email address:. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Anesthesia Analgesia Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. eTOC. All Content Current Issue. Current Issue. Published Ahead-of-Print. Open Access. Reprints. Rights and Permissions. Current Issue. Contributor Index. Add Item s to:. A New Folder Folder Name:. The item s has been successfully added to " ". Email to a Colleague. Your Email:. Message: Thought you might appreciate this item s I saw at Anesthesia Analgesia. Export to. October 2015 - Volume 121 - Issue 4 - Contributor Index. View All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Other. Add to My Favorites Email to Colleague Export to Citation Manager. View. Title Citation Abstract. Anesthesia & Analgesia. 121 4 :925-933, October 2015. Purchase Access. In Brief In Brief Abstract Abstract PDF + Favorites Request Permissions. Abstract:. In Brief: Published ahead of print March 27, 2015. Goetzl, L...
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*  Preventive analgesia
... is a practice aimed at reducing short and long term post surgery pain activity in the body s pain signalling system during surgery produces sensitization that is it increases the intensity of post operative pain reducing activity in the body s pain signalling system by the use of analgesics before during and immediately after surgery is thought to reduce subsequent sensitization and consequently the intensity of post surgery pain the types of nerve activity targeted in preventive analgesia include pre surgery pain all pain system activity caused during surgery and pain produced post surgery by damage and inflammation a person s assessment of pain intensity from standard experimental stimuli prior to surgery is correlated with the intensity of their post surgery pain pain intensity immediately post surgery is correlated with pain intensity on release from hospital and correlated with the likelihood of experiencing chronic post surgery pain it is not known what causes some cases of acute post surgery pain ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preventive_analgesia
*  Clinical Briefs: Clinical Briefs - American Family Physician
... Clinical Briefs. All others: Purchase online access. Purchase online access to read the full version of this article. Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA has issued a bulletin warning international business travelers of the risks of exposure to infectious diseases. The Committee on Obstetric Practice of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists ACOG has issued an opinion paper on the management of asymptomatic pregnant or lactating women who have been exposed to anthrax. ACOG Committee Opinion No. Updates on the prophylactic treatment of anthrax are available online at www.bt.cdc.gov and www.cdc.gov/mmwr. ACOG Opinion Paper on Analgesia and Cesarean Delivery. The Committee on Obstetric Practice of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists ACOG has issued an opinion paper on analgesia and the rate of cesarean deliveries. ACOG Committee Opinion No. In a previous report by the ACOG Task Force on Cesarean Delivery, various studies produced conflicting data on the ri...
http://aafp.org/afp/2002/0615/p2592.html
*  Development of a Novel Blood-Sparing Agent in Cardiac Surger... : Anesthesia & Analgesia
Development of a Novel Blood-Sparing Agent in Cardiac Surger... : Anesthesia Analgesia. Advertisement. Enter your Email address:. Wolters Kluwer Health may email you for journal alerts and information, but is committed to maintaining your privacy and will not share your personal information without your express consent. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Anesthesia Analgesia Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Saved Searches. Recent Searches. You currently have no recent searches. Login. Register. Activate Subscription. eTOC. Help. All Content Current Issue Issue Displayed. Advanced Search. Current Issue. Previous Issues. Published Ahead-of-Print. CME. Subjects. Timely Topics. Translations. Podcasts. For Authors. Information for Authors. Language Editing Services. Open Access. Journal Info. About the Journal. About the Society. Editorial Board. Affiliated Societies. Advertising. Subscription Services. Reprints. Rights and Permissions. Contact Us. Mobile. New Features. iPad App. Cover Art Galler...
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*  October 1984 - Volume 63 - Issue 10 : Anesthesia & Analgesia
October 1984 - Volume 63 - Issue 10 : Anesthesia Analgesia. Advertisement. Enter your Email address:. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Anesthesia Analgesia Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. eTOC. Current Issue. Open Access. About the Journal. About the Society. Rights and Permissions. October 1984 - Volume 63 - Issue 10. Next Issue. October 1984 - Volume 63 - Issue 10. Table of Contents Outline Subscribe to eTOC View Contributor Index. Add Item s to:. An Existing Folder. A New Folder Folder Name:. The item s has been successfully added to " ". Email to a Colleague. Your Email:. Colleague's Email: Separate multiple e-mails with a ;. Message: Thought you might appreciate this item s I saw at Anesthesia Analgesia. Your message has been successfully sent to your colleague. Some error has occurred while processing your request. Export to. Add to My Favorites Email to Colleague Export to Citation Manager. View. Title Citation Abstract. SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE. PDF Only. Fassoulaki, Argyro; Eger, Edmon...
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*  In Response : Anesthesia & Analgesia
In Response : Anesthesia Analgesia. Advertisement. Enter your Email address:. Wolters Kluwer Health may email you for journal alerts and information, but is committed to maintaining your privacy and will not share your personal information without your express consent. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Anesthesia Analgesia Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Saved Searches. Recent Searches. You currently have no recent searches. Login. Register. Activate Subscription. eTOC. Help. All Content Current Issue Issue Displayed. Advanced Search. Current Issue. Previous Issues. Published Ahead-of-Print. CME. Subjects. Timely Topics. Translations. Podcasts. For Authors. Information for Authors. Language Editing Services. Open Access. Journal Info. About the Journal. About the Society. Editorial Board. Affiliated Societies. Advertising. Subscription Services. Reprints. Rights and Permissions. Contact Us. Mobile. New Features. iPad App. Cover Art Gallery. Home. April 2014 - Volume 118 - Issue 4. In Respo...
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*  Relative analgesia machine
... a relative analgesia machine is used by dentist s to induce inhalation sedation in their patients it delivers a mixture of nitrous oxide laughing gas and oxygen a relative analgesia machine is simpler than an anaesthetic machine as it does not feature the additional medical ventilator and anaesthetic vaporiser which are only needed for administration of general anesthetic s instead the relative analgesia machine is designed for the light form of anaesthesia with nitrous oxide where the patient is less sensitive to pain but remains fully conscious references category dentistry category anesthetic equipment category drug delivery devices category dosage forms...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relative_analgesia_machine
*  Mechanisms of peripheral immune-cell-mediated analgesia in inflammation: clinical and therapeutic im
... plications. The University of Newcastle's Digital Repository. The University of Newcastle's Digital Repository. Show Quick Collection. Advanced Search Browse + By Title By Author/Creator By Keyword By Date By Resource Type. List Of Titles Mechanisms of peripheral immune-cell-mediated analgesia in inflammation: clinical and therapeutic implications. Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1959.13/926699. Title Mechanisms of peripheral immune-cell-mediated analgesia in inflammation: clinical and therapeutic implications Creator Hua, Susan ; Cabot, Peter J. The University of Newcastle. Faculty of Health, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy Description Peripheral mechanisms of endogenous pain control are significant. In peripheral inflamed tissue, an interaction between immune-cell-derived opioids and opioid receptors localized on sensory nerve terminals results in potent, clinically measurable analgesia. These cells ‘home’ preferentially to injured tissue, where ...
http://nova.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/uon:9914?exact=creator:"Cabot, Peter J."
*  Modified Short-Axis Out-of-Plane Ultrasound Versus Conventio... : Anesthesia & Analgesia
Modified Short-Axis Out-of-Plane Ultrasound Versus Conventio... : Anesthesia Analgesia. Advertisement. Enter your Email address:. Wolters Kluwer Health may email you for journal alerts and information, but is committed to maintaining your privacy and will not share your personal information without your express consent. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Anesthesia Analgesia Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Saved Searches. Recent Searches. You currently have no recent searches. Login. Register. Activate Subscription. eTOC. Help. All Content Current Issue Issue Displayed. Advanced Search. Current Issue. Previous Issues. Published Ahead-of-Print. CME. Subjects. Timely Topics. Translations. Podcasts. For Authors. Information for Authors. Language Editing Services. Open Access. Journal Info. About the Journal. About the Society. Editorial Board. Affiliated Societies. Advertising. Subscription Services. Reprints. Rights and Permissions. Contact Us. Mobile. New Features. iPad App. Cover Art Galler...
http://journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/subjects/Technology/Abstract/2014/07000/Modified_Short_Axis_Out_of_Plane_Ultrasound_Versus.24.aspx
*  Serum MMP-8 and TIMP-1 in Critically Ill Patients with Acute... : Anesthesia & Analgesia
Serum MMP-8 and TIMP-1 in Critically Ill Patients with Acute... : Anesthesia Analgesia. . Advertisement. Enter your Email address:. Wolters Kluwer Health may email you for journal alerts and information, but is committed to maintaining your privacy and will not share your personal information without your express consent. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Anesthesia Analgesia Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Saved Searches. Recent Searches. You currently have no recent searches. Login. Register. Activate Subscription. eTOC. Help. All Content Current Issue Issue Displayed. Advanced Search. Current Issue. Previous Issues. Published Ahead-of-Print. CME. Subjects. Timely Topics. Translations. Podcasts. For Authors. Information for Authors. Language Editing Services. Open Access. Journal Info. About the Journal. About the Society. Editorial Board. Affiliated Societies. Advertising. Subscription Services. Reprints. Rights and Permissions. Contact Us. Mobile. New Features. iPad App. Cover Art Gall...
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*  Anesthesia and analgesia
... redirect anesthesia analgesia...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anesthesia_and_analgesia
*  Analgesia (Keyword Definition)
analgesia keyword definition wildpro species chemicals physical how to diseases environments refs gloss help glossary references keywords list definitions term to be defined definition synonyms keywords analgesia the absence of normal sensitivity to pain typically being in a semiconscious state induced through an anaesthetic b absence of pain on noxious stimulation j w reduced sensibility to pain without loss of consciousness and without the sense of touch necessarily being affected b...
http://wildpro.twycrosszoo.org/S/00Ref/KeywordsContents/a/Analgesia.htm
*  Anesth. Analg.
anesth analg anesth analg redirect anesthesia analgesia...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anesth._Analg.
*  Discontinuation of epidural analgesia late in labour for reducing the adverse delivery outcomes asso
... ciated with epidural analgesia. Cochrane Trusted evidence. Discontinuation of epidural analgesia late in labour for reducing the adverse delivery outcomes associated with epidural analgesia Not enough evidence to suggest that stopping an epidural late in labour lowers the risk of instrumental delivery or other unwanted outcomes. Epidurals are used for pain relief in labour, but they increase the risk of instrumental delivery vacuum/forceps. There is not enough evidence from the five included trials, involving 462 participants, to show whether stopping an epidural really does lower the risk of instrumental delivery or of any other unwanted outcome. analgesia late in labour reduces the rate of instrumental delivery. analgesia provides the most effective labour analgesia, it is associated with some adverse obstetric consequences, including an increased risk of instrumental delivery. analgesia late in labour on: i rates of instrumental deliveries and other delivery outcomes; and ii analgesia and satisfaction ...
http://cochrane.org/CD004457/PREG_discontinuation-of-epidural-analgesia-late-in-labour-for-reducing-the-adverse-delivery-outcomes-associated-with-epidural-analgesia
*  Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia Versus Continuous Epidural Infusion: Obstetrical and Neonatal
... Outcomes. Topics. Publish Your News On BioPortfolio. Search News On BioPortfolio. Clinical Trials. Search Clinical Trials. Latest Clinical Trials. Topics. Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia Versus Continuous Epidural Infusion: Obstetrical and Neonatal Outcomes. Home » Topics » Anesthesia » Research » Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia Versus Continuous Epidural Infusion: Obstetrical and Neonatal Outcomes. The continuous epidural infusion group Group I will be started immediately on a continuous pump infusion.They will also have the opportunity to give a PCA bolus Finally, the patient controlled epidural group Group III will be able to give a bolus every 20 minutes with no continuous infusion. After delivery, obstetrical outcomes, neonatal outcomes, anesthesia interventions, and patient satisfaction questionnaires will then be collected. bupivicaine epidural, bupivicaine epidural infusion patient epidural, bupivicaine. Clinical Trials. Programmed Intermittent Epidural Bolus Versus Continuous Epidura...
http://bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/81652/Patient-Controlled-Epidural-Analgesia-Versus-Continuous-Epidural-Infusion-Obstetrical-And-Neonatal-Outcomes.html
*  Tips From Other Journals - American Family Physician
Tips From Other Journals Epidural Analgesia Prolongs the Active Phase of Labor. All others: Purchase online access. Alexander and colleagues studied the effect of epidural analgesia on the Friedman labor curve. The mothers were randomly assigned to either patient-controlled epidural analgesia or intravenous meperidine, also patient-controlled. View/Print Figure Cervical Dilatation. Comparison of the rates of cervical dilatation during the active phase of labor, originally reported by Friedman and now reported for the women who received patient-controlled intravenous meperidine, patient-controlled epidural analgesia, or the combined cohort. Epidural analgesia lengthens the Friedman active phase of labor. Cervical Dilatation FIGURE. Comparison of the rates of cervical dilatation during the active phase of labor, originally reported by Friedman and now reported for the women who received patient-controlled intravenous meperidine, patient-controlled epidural analgesia, or the combined cohort. Epidural analgesia l...
http://aafp.org/afp/2002/1115/p1960.html
*  Epidural analgesia (a form of pain control) for the pain relief following hip and knee replacement |
Epidural analgesia a form of pain control for the pain relief following hip and knee replacement. Cochrane. Cochrane Trusted evidence. Better health. Epidural analgesia a form of pain control for the pain relief following hip and knee replacement Epidural analgesia may give good pain relief after hip or knee replacement surgery, but this benefit must be weighed against the possibility of adverse effects and complications. This review found that an epidural comprising local anaesthetic with or without a strong opioid might give better pain relief than an epidural with only strong opioids; the benefit may be felt only in the first four to six hours after surgery. analgesia was compared to other methods for pain relief. These observations were based only on studies evaluating populations consisting of total knee replacements alone or mixed populations of total hip or total knee replacements. For pain relief with movement after surgery, patients receiving epidural. You may also be interested in: Epidural analgesi...
http://cochrane.org/CD003071/ANAESTH_epidural-analgesia-a-form-of-pain-control-for-the-pain-relief-following-hip-and-knee-replacement
*  For Pain Control during Early Labor, Combined Spinal-Epidural Analgesia Is Best
... Expert Pitch. Expert Pitch. For Pain Control during Early Labor, Combined Spinal-Epidural Analgesia Is Best Released: 27-Feb-2013 11:00 AM EST Source Newsroom:. International Anesthesia Research Society IARS. Combined Technique Has Advantages—But Both CSE and Epidural Analgesia Are 'Excellent' Options Newswise San Francisco, CA. February 27, 2013 – During the first stage of labor, a combined spinal-epidural CSE technique offers faster and better-quality analgesia pain relief compared to traditional epidural analgesia, according to a report in the March issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society IARS. Epidural versus CSE for Pain Control during Labor The researchers compared CSE with epidural analgesia in 800 healthy women requiring pain control during labor. Despite Differences, Both CSE and Epidural Are 'Excellent Options' Epidural analgesia has been used to provide labor pain relief for more than 40 years, with modern techniques providing better p...
http://newswise.com/articles/for-pain-control-during-early-labor-combined-spinal-epidural-analgesia-is-best
*  Epidural Analgesia | Options: Pelvic Floor :: Childbirth Connection
Epidural Analgesia. Options: Pelvic Floor :: Childbirth Connection. Epidural Analgesia. What is epidural analgesia. How can having an epidural affect my pelvic floor. What are alternative ways of coping with labor pain. What is epidural analgesia. Epidural analgesia involves injecting one or more medications into the space that surrounds the spinal cord in order to relieve labor pain. The Epidural and Spinal page in the Labor Pain Pergnancy Topic discusses this technique in detail. How can having an epidural affect my pelvic floor. Epidural analgesia can lead to pelvic floor harm by increasing the likelihood of episiotomy cutting the vaginal opening straight back to enlarge it for birth and vacuum extraction or forceps delivery assisted vaginal birth. These procedures, especially with use of midline episiotomy cutting straight toward the anus to enlarge the vaginal opening at the time of birth, greatly increase the chance of a tear into or through the anal muscle. Anal muscle tears can lead to bowel incontine...
http://childbirthconnection.org/printerfriendly.asp?ck=10202
*  .. Posts Tagged ‘obstetrical complications’ .. Home Births – Increasingly Popular But Are The
The study found a 20 percent increase in the number of women in the United States who gave birth at home between 2004 and 2008. While epidural analgesia is very effective at helping women cope with the pain of labor, it is important to have an appreciation for the possible complications associated with such medical treatment.  If you are an expectant mother, the last thing you want to do is think about the possible risks of epidural analgesia – while you are in labor . The decision to have epidural analgesia during labor should not be a hasty, last minute decision.  The following is a survey of a number of complications associated with epidural analgesia. It is intended to provide expectant mothers with a general understanding of the various complications associated with epidural analgesia and to encourage further inquiry. It is important to know that epidural analgesia may cause infection i.e., epidural abscess. If you are an expectant mother, talk to your obstetrician about the risks associated with epi...
http://medicalmalpracticeblog.nashandassociates.com/tag/obstetrical-complications-2/
*  Small dose of clonidine mixed with low-dose ropivacaine and fentanyl for epidural analgesia after to
... tal knee arthroplasty. BioMedSearch. Home. Advanced Search. Tools. Search Tutorial. Login. Create Free Account. Document Detail. Small dose of clonidine mixed with low-dose ropivacaine and fentanyl for epidural analgesia after total knee arthroplasty. MedLine Citation:. PMID: 15377579 Owner: NLM Status: MEDLINE. Abstract/OtherAbstract:. BACKGROUND: We studied whether a small dose of clonidine added to a ropivacaine-fentanyl mixture improves epidural analgesia without provoking side effects typically related to larger amounts of epidural clonidine. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blinded study, patients or =85 yr, ASA I-III underwent total knee arthroplasty TKA performed under spinal anaesthesia. After the operation, patients received an epidural infusion consisting of ropivacaine 2 mg ml -1 and fentanyl 5 microg ml -1 either without Group RF, n=33 or with clonidine 2 microg ml -1 Group RFC, n=36. The infusion rate was adjusted within the range 3-7 ml h -1. RESULTS: Average rate of infusion was slightl...
http://biomedsearch.com/nih/Small-dose-clonidine-mixed-with/15377579.html
*  The Acute Pain Service - HSS.edu
... Your Anesthesiologist at HSS. Orthopedic Special Care Unit OSCU. Your Anesthesiologist at HSS. Orthopedic Special Care Unit OSCU. Because of the severity of orthopedic postoperative pain, surgeons at HSS often consult the Acute Pain Service APS to assist with pain management. Epidural analgesia, nerve blocks, continuous nerve blocks, local anesthetics, opioids, anti-inflammatory drugs, and ice therapy are among the modes of painkillers currently employed at HSS. The APS has designed special postoperative analgesia programs for patients undergoing total hip and knee replacement. Pain Management for Patients Having a Total Hip Replacement: Just prior to surgery, your anesthesiologist will place an epidural catheter small tube by the spine to be used for postoperative epidural analgesia. The epidural analgesia will be controlled by you with a PCA device that gives a small continuous infusion in addition to the self-administered doses. On the morning after surgery, the continuous infusion will be stopped but...
https://hss.edu/anesthesiology-acute-pain-service.asp
*  Effects of intrapartum epidural analgesia at high altitudes: maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes.
... A randomized controlled trial of two formulations of analgesics. Effects of intrapartum epidural analgesia at high altitudes: maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes. A randomized controlled trial of two formulations of analgesics. MedLine Citation:. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether intrapartum epidural analgesics bupivacaine or ropivacaine have an influence safety and efficacy on mothers, fetuses, or newborns at high altitudes 2,200 m above the sea level. DESIGN: Prospective randomized trial. POPULATION: Eighty parturient women with normal full term pregnancy 37-40 weeks were randomly allocated to a group receiving epidural bupivacaine 0.125% and the other receiving ropivacaine 0.2%, with fentanyl 100 microg given to both groups. METHODS: Intra- and postpartum clinical management of the pregnant women and newborns and fetal Doppler assessments were performed. RESULTS: Demographic, labor characteristics, and neonatal outcomes of the two groups were comparable. CONCLUSION: At high altitudes, no major adv...
http://biomedsearch.com/nih/Effects-intrapartum-epidural-analgesia-at/20583937.html
*  Use of Ultrasound in Obstetric Neuraxial Analgesia and Anesthesia Data Base - Full Text View - Clini
... calTrials.gov. Verified January 2010 by University of Missouri-Columbia. Recruitment status was Recruiting Sponsor: University of Missouri-Columbia Information provided by: University of Missouri-Columbia. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01192074 First received: August 26, 2010 Last updated: August 30, 2010 Last verified: January 2010 History of Changes. Data collection includes ultrasound measured depth, actual needle depth, angle of ultrasound probe, actual needle angle, success rates, patient height and weight, number of attempts needed to place the epidural needle or spinal needle. Currently we are looking at the agreement between ultrasound determined depth of the epidural space or intrathecal space with actual needle depth. Further study details as provided by University of Missouri-Columbia:. Primary Outcome Measures: Correlation of Ultrasound vs Needle Depth The ultrasound measured depth taken via oblique sagittal views and transverse views of the epidural space for epidural analgesia or intrath...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01192074
*  Patient controlled epidural analgesia: a nursing perspective - Research Repository
patient controlled epidural analgesia a nursing perspective research repository jump to main menu navigation jump to page content research at kingston university login home about browse by year browse by research area browse by faculty browse by kingston author search help patient controlled epidural analgesia a nursing perspective rushworth mark marshall lucette sylvie and coppard sue patient controlled epidural analgesia a nursing perspective gastrointestinal nursing pp issn print full text not available from this archive item type article research area nursing and midwifery faculty school or research centre faculty of health and social care sciences until depositing user mark brennan date deposited sep last modified jul uri http eprints kingston ac uk id eprint actions repository editors item control page disclaimer copyright freedom of information privacy policy cookies...
http://eprints.kingston.ac.uk/2642/
*  M C Vallejo
2012 Aprepitant plus ondansetron compared with ondansetron alone in reducing postoperative nausea and vomiting in ambulatory patients undergoing plastic surgery Manuel C Vallejo Department of Anesthesiology, Magee Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA Plast Reconstr Surg 129:519-26. 2007 Epidural labor analgesia: continuous infusion versus patient-controlled epidural analgesia with background infusion versus without a background infusion Manuel C Vallejo Department of Anesthesiology, Magee Womens Hospital of UPMC, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA J Pain 8:970-5. Efficacy of the bilateral ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric block with intrathecal morphine for postoperative cesarean delivery analgesia Manuel C Vallejo Department of Anesthesiology, Magee Womens Hospital of UPMC, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA ScientificWorldJournal 2012:107316. Aprepitant plus ondansetron compared with ondansetron alone in ...
http://labome.org/expert/usa/university/vallejo/m-c-vallejo-544709.html
*  The epidural “fever”: What does an obstetrician need to know? - Springer
The epidural “fever”: What does an obstetrician need to know. - Springer. Search Help. Contact Us. Find out how to access preview-only content. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics July 2007 , Volume 276, Issue 1, pp 71-72 First online: 08 August 2006. The epidural “fever”: What does an obstetrician need to know. Kuczkowski. Affiliated with Departments of Anesthesiology and Reproductive Medicine, UCSD Medical Center. Keywords Fever Maternal Fetal Labor Labor analgesia Epidural Complications. Share Share this content on Facebook Share this content on Twitter Share this content on LinkedIn. Related Content. Thierrin L, Mercier FJ 2005 Epidural analgesia and fever during labor. Kuczkowski KM, Reisner LS 2003 Anesthetic management of the parturient with fever and infection. CrossRef. CrossRef. Viscomi CM, Manullang T 2000 Maternal fever, neonatal sepsis evaluation, and epidural labor analgesia. CrossRef. Fusi L, Maresh MJA, Steer PJ et al 1989 Maternal pyrexia associated with the use of epidural analgesia in lab...
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00404-006-0222-3
*  M M L H Wassen
Publications Epidural analgesia and operative delivery: a ten-year population-based cohort study in The Netherlands Martine M L H Wassen Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands Electronic address Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 183:125-31. 2014 Women's prelabour preference for epidural analgesia: a cross-sectional study among women from the Netherlands and Belgium Martine Wassen Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maastricht University Medical Center, P Debyelaan 25, Maastricht, The Netherlands J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol 34:22-8. 2013 Early versus late epidural analgesia and risk of instrumental delivery in nulliparous women: a systematic review M M L H Wassen Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands BJOG 118:655-61. Detail Information Publications 4 Epidural analgesia and operative delivery: a ten...
http://labome.org/expert/wassen/m-m-l-h-wassen-1718845.html
*  Women used 30 percent less analgesia during labor when self-administered -- ScienceDaily
... Date: February 10, 2011 Source: Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine Summary: When women administer their own patient-controlled epidural analgesia instead of getting a continuous epidural infusion they used less analgesic, but reported similar levels of satisfaction, according to a new study. In a study to be presented February 10 at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's SMFM annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in San Francisco, researchers will present findings that show that when women administer their own patient-controlled epidural analgesia PCEA instead of getting a continuous epidural infusion CEI they used less analgesic, but reported similar levels of satisfaction. The study results showed that total mg bupivicaine used was less in the PCEA only group compared to CEI; group 1 74.9 36 mg, group 2 95.9 52 mg, group 3 52.8 42 mg p .001. "Though patients in each group showed equal satisfaction, we did note that there was more pain during the final delivery stage in the PCEA group," said Haydon...
http://sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110210080241.htm
*  Does Regional Analgesia for Major Surgery Improve Outcome? F... : Anesthesia & Analgesia
Does Regional Analgesia for Major Surgery Improve Outcome. F... : Anesthesia Analgesia. . Enter your Email address:. Wolters Kluwer Health may email you for journal alerts and information, but is committed to maintaining your privacy and will not share your personal information without your express consent. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Anesthesia Analgesia Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Saved Searches. Recent Searches. You currently have no recent searches. Login. Register. Activate Subscription. eTOC. Help. All Content Current Issue Issue Displayed. Advanced Search. Current Issue. Previous Issues. Published Ahead-of-Print. CME. Subjects. Timely Topics. Translations. Podcasts. For Authors. Information for Authors. Language Editing Services. Open Access. Journal Info. About the Journal. About the Society. Editorial Board. Affiliated Societies. Advertising. Subscription Services. Reprints. Rights and Permissions. Contact Us. Mobile. New Features. iPad App. Cover Art Gallery. Home. Sept...
http://journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/Fulltext/2014/09000/Does_Regional_Analgesia_for_Major_Surgery_Improve.33.aspx
*  Anesthesia E-ssential February 17, 2014
AANA Foundation. More Than 14 Percent of Pregnant Women Prescribed Opioids Epidural Prolongs Second Stage of Labor by More Than 2 Hours Stellate Ganglion Blockade May Be Alternative to HT for Vasomotor Symptoms Researcher Finds Hispanic Women Opt for Labor Pain Relief Less Often Than Others Patient Controlled Analgesia Not Equivalent to Epidural Analgesia for Pain Relief During Labor Drug Shortages Continue to Vex Doctors New Pain Treatment Aims to Reduce Prescription Opioids Sedation and Delirium in the Intensive Care Unit TAVR With Local Anesthesia Only Found Feasible From Research to Nationwide Implementation: The Impact of AHRQ's HAI Prevention Program Guidelines for Safety in the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit Inside the Association. Return to Headlines Researcher Finds Hispanic Women Opt for Labor Pain Relief Less Often Than Others According to research conducted by University of Virginia School of Nursing doctoral candidate Juliane Milburn, Hispanic women are 53 percent less likely to have an epidural...
http://aana.com/newsandjournal/Periodicals/Pages/Anesthesia-E-ssential-February-14-2014.aspx
*  Epidural administration
'Epidural administration' from Ancient Greek ἐπί, "on, upon" + dura mater is a medical route of administration in which a drug or contrast agent is injected into the epidural space of the spinal cord. Techniques such as 'epidural analgesia ' and 'epidural anaesthesia ' employ this route of administration. Epidural techniques frequently involve injection of drugs through a catheter placed into the epidural space. Epidural analgesia after surgery. Combined spinal-epidural techniques. Spinal anaesthesia is a technique whereby a local anaesthetic drug is injected into the cerebrospinal fluid. To achieve epidural analgesia or anaesthesia, a larger dose of drug is typically necessary than with spinal analgesia or anaesthesia. An epidural injection or infusion for pain relief e.g. Analgesics are given into the epidural space typically for a few days after surgery, provided a catheter has been inserted. Epidural space. Hence, lumbar epidural injections carry a low risk of injuring the spinal cord. More use of instrum...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epidural_administration
*  All About Epidurals: Articles about Breastfeeding, childbirth, and pregnancy online magazine: The Co
... mpleat Mother. More recent forms of epidurals use a lower dose of local anaesthetic, usually combined with an opiate, such as pethidine, morphine or fentanyl sublimaze. With this low-dose or combination epidural, most women can move around with support; however the chance of a woman being able to give birth without forceps is still low 4. This gives pain relief for round 2 hours, and if further pain relief is needed, it is given as an epidural. Many women have a good experience with epidurals. Sometimes the relief from pain can allow a woman to rest and relax sufficiently to go on and have a good birth experience. Although the drugs used in epidurals are injected around the spinal cord, substantial amounts enter the mothers blood stream, and pass through the placenta into the baby's circulation. Other studies have shown that, after an epidural, mothers spent less time with their newborn babies 40, and described their babies at one month as more difficult to care for. In fact, a UK survey which asked about...
http://compleatmother.com/epidural.htm
*  Tips From Other Journals - American Family Physician
... Advertisement. Previous article Next article. Jan 1, 2003 Issue. Tips from Other Journals Does the Use of Epidural Analgesia Lead to Backache. FREE PREVIEW. AAFP members and paid subscribers: Log in to get free access. All others: Purchase online access. FREE PREVIEW. Purchase online access to read the full version of this article. Am Fam Physician. 2003 Jan 1;67 1 :169. Anecdotal reports and small studies have linked the use of epidural analgesia during childbirth to long-term backache with restriction of movement and disability. Howell and colleagues conducted a large study in an English region to investigate the alleged link. The authors used data from a randomized controlled trial of epidural analgesia during labor involving 369 primigravidas with cephalic presentation at term. These women were randomly assigned to epidural or other methods of pain relief during delivery. From this original study, 151 women treated with epidural and 155 women from the control group agreed to take part in the follow-u...
http://aafp.org/afp/2003/0101/p169.html
*  Epidurals for Pain Relief - FamilyEducation.com
... Original URL: http://pregnancy.familyeducation.com/pain-management/epidural/66185.html. Epidurals for Pain Relief In This Article:. Epidurals. See the procedure Epidural side effects and problems. Epidural side effects and problems Side effects There are a number of minor side effects. The medication can cause blood pressure to fall, so this will be monitored see How an epidural is done. If it does fall, you'll be given fluids and medication, and subsequent doses may be reduced. It's common to experience itching with epidurals, caused by the release of histamine from the opioid component of a mobile epidural. Histamine is a substance released by the body during an allergic reaction that can cause itching. The itch can be treated, but in most cases it gets better on its own. If you develop an itch, a greater concentration of local anesthetic alone will be used. It's not unusual to shiver with an epidural, although this is a more common side effect if a concentrated local anesthetic is used, as is the case...
http://pregnancy.familyeducation.com/pain-management/epidural/66185.html?pollres=1&page=3&for_printing=1
*  More expectant moms requesting epidurals – a sharp departure from a generation ago, doctors say -
More expectant moms requesting epidurals a sharp departure from a generation ago, doctors say - Sun Sentinel. Save big. Get 6 months of unlimited digital access for the price of 3. Sun Sentinel. More moms choose to limit childbirth pain. Burnetta Herron-Mitchell Antonio Perez, Chicago Tribune. Burnetta Herron-Mitchell kisses her 2-month-old daughter Rhys in the neonatal ICU at Loyola Hospital in Maywood. Herron-Mitchell had an epidural while giving birth. Burnetta Herron-Mitchell kisses her 2-month-old daughter Rhys in the neonatal ICU at Loyola Hospital in Maywood. Herron-Mitchell had an epidural while giving birth. Antonio Perez, Chicago Tribune. Leslie Mann, Special to the Tribune. The exhaustion and nausea were unavoidable during Burnetta Herron-Mitchell's three-day labor, but an epidural analgesia helped keep the pain at bay before she delivered her baby girl Rhys. Typically called an epidural, this type of analgesia is injected into the epidural space of the spinal cord, causing lost sensation in the pe...
http://sun-sentinel.com/ct-x-0425-epidurals-in-demand-20120425-story.html
*  Combined Spinal Epidural or Traditional Epidural Technique:... : Anesthesia & Analgesia
Combined Spinal Epidural or Traditional Epidural Technique:... : Anesthesia Analgesia. . Advertisement. Enter your Email address:. Wolters Kluwer Health may email you for journal alerts and information, but is committed to maintaining your privacy and will not share your personal information without your express consent. For more information, please refer to our Privacy Policy. Anesthesia Analgesia Wolters Kluwer Health Logo. Saved Searches. Recent Searches. You currently have no recent searches. Login. Register. Activate Subscription. eTOC. Help. All Content Current Issue Issue Displayed. Advanced Search. Current Issue. Previous Issues. Published Ahead-of-Print. CME. Subjects. Timely Topics. Translations. Podcasts. For Authors. Information for Authors. Language Editing Services. Open Access. Journal Info. About the Journal. About the Society. Editorial Board. Affiliated Societies. Advertising. Subscription Services. Reprints. Rights and Permissions. Contact Us. Mobile. New Features. iPad App. Cover Art Galle...
http://journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/subjects/Anesthetic Techniques/Fulltext/2013/03000/Combined_Spinal_Epidural_or_Traditional_Epidural.2.aspx
*  The Bump Blog » epidural analgesia
Pregnancy and Parenting News and Trends Mon, 05 Oct 2015 04:04:24 +0000...
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*  Search of: 11009235 [PUBMED-IDS] - List Results - ClinicalTrials.gov
Search of: 11009235 - List Results - ClinicalTrials.gov. National Institutes of Health Example: "Heart attack" AND "Los Angeles" Search for studies:. Advanced Search. Help. Studies by Topic. Glossary. Find Studies. Basic Search. Advanced Search. See Studies by Topic. See Studies on Map. How to Search. How to Use Search Results. How to Find Results of Studies. How to Read a Study Record. About Clinical Studies. Learn About Clinical Studies. Other Sites About Clinical Studies. Glossary of Common Site Terms. Submit Studies. Why Should I Register and Submit Results. How to Register Your Study. How to Edit Your Study Record. How to Submit Your Results. Resources. RSS Feeds. Downloading Content for Analysis. About This Site. ClinicalTrials.gov Background. Linking to This Site. Terms and Conditions. Disclaimer. Find Studies. Search Results. 1 study found for : 11009235 Modify this search. How to Use Search Results. List. By Topic. On a Map. Search Details. Show Display Options. Subscribe to RSS Create an RSS feed fr...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/search/term=11009235 [PUBMED-IDS]
*  Effect of spinal versus general anesthesia on bladder compliance and intraabdominal pressure during
... transurethral procedures. Effect of spinal versus general anesthesia on bladder compliance and intraabdominal pressure during transurethral procedures. STUDY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of spinal versus general anesthesia on bladder compliance and intraabdominal pressure in elderly males undergoing elective transurethral resection of the prostate. In Group General Anesthesia GA , patients received, fentanyl intravenous i.v. Intraabdominal pressure and bladder compliance were recorded prior to the induction of anesthesia and immediately before the onset of the surgical procedure. In Group S, mean bladder compliance was significantly p = 0.003 higher and mean intraabdominal pressure significantly lower p = 0.007 when compared to baseline preanesthetic values. Following the induction of general anesthesia, a small change in bladder compliance was noted. CONCLUSION: Both spinal and general anesthesia induced a significant decrease in intraabdominal pressure. 2785266 - Alcohol and blood pressure: res...
http://biomedsearch.com/nih/Effect-spinal-versus-general-anesthesia/10470636.html
*  Fear of General Anesthesia
... Anxiety Forums, Blogs & Support Groups. Anxiety Zone. Member Groups. Member Blogs. Health News. Anxiety Zone Forums, Blogs Support Groups. Anxiety Disorders. Fear of General Anesthesia. Author Topic: Fear of General Anesthesia Read 724 times. Member. Posts: 75 Rec's: 0 Personal text. Fear of General Anesthesia on: May 31, 2014, 10:52:40 PM. Not so much of the surgery, but rather being put under. I know general anesthesia is pretty safe, but I have read horrible stories of it going awry. To my knowledge everything went fine. If I was at risk of an allergic reaction would I already be aware due to that surgery. I usually dont have the best of luck and I m just afraid something will go wrong. Tweet Logged. Posts: 183 Country:. Rec's: 3 Gender:. Personal text. Re: Fear of General Anesthesia Reply #1 on: June 01, 2014, 12:50:41 AM. Tweet Logged. mollyfin Hero Member. Posts: 6075 Rec's: 57 Personal text. Re: Fear of General Anesthesia Reply #2 on: June 01, 2014, 02:26:45 AM. Totally normal fear to have. Even p...
http://anxietyzone.com/index.php/topic,89017.msg496804.html
*  General Anesthesia
... Anxiety Forums, Blogs & Support Groups. Anxiety Zone. Answer Follow us on Twitter @anxietyzone. Member Groups. Member Blogs. Health News. Anxiety Zone Forums, Blogs Support Groups. Anxiety Disorders. General Anesthesia. previous next Print. Author Topic: General Anesthesia Read 513 times. ivyt73 Full Member. Posts: 162 Rec's: 2 Personal text. General Anesthesia on: March 13, 2014, 07:34:27 AM. I am not so much scared of the surgery but I am terrified about being put under general anesthesia. Tweet Logged. mydogisnamedslippy Full Member. Posts: 100 Country:. Rec's: 0 Gender: Mood: Calm aaaaaaahhhhhhhhh. Re: General Anesthesia Reply #1 on: March 13, 2014, 10:01:41 AM. Honestly, I love anesthesia. I wish I could have anesthesia for everything like going on a plane, or going to the dentist. You ll be fine. Tweet Logged. Member. Posts: 68 Country:. Rec's: 1 Personal text. Re: General Anesthesia Reply #2 on: March 13, 2014, 10:33:13 AM. I ve never been put under, but I do have this same fear. Tweet Logged. Mem...
http://anxietyzone.com/index.php/topic,84931.msg476617.html
*  General Anesthesia
... Topic Overview General anesthesia is a combination of medicines that you inhale or receive through a needle in a vein to cause you to become unconscious. General anesthesia suppresses many of your body's normal automatic functions, such as those that control breathing, heartbeat, circulation of the blood such as blood pressure, movements of the digestive system, and throat reflexes such as swallowing, coughing, or gagging that prevent foreign material from being inhaled into your lungs aspiration. Because these functions are suppressed, an anesthesia specialist must carefully keep a balance of medicines while watching your heart, breathing, blood pressure, and other vital functions. After you are unconscious, anesthesia may be maintained with an inhaled anesthetic alone, with a combination of intravenous anesthetics, or a combination of inhaled and intravenous anesthetics. It may take some time before the effects of the anesthesia are completely gone. Risks and complications from general anesthesia Serio...
http://ghc.org/kbase/topic.jhtml?docId=rt1584
*  General anaesthesia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
... General anaesthesia. General anaesthesia. This article needs additional citations for verification. General anaesthesia or general anesthesia is a medically induced coma and loss of protective reflexes resulting from the administration of one or more general anaesthetic agents. 1 History 2 Purpose 3 Biochemical mechanism of action 4 Preanaesthetic evaluation 5 Premedication 6 Stages of anaesthesia 7 Induction. 7.1 Physiologic monitoring 7.2 Airway management 7.3 Eye management 7.4 Neuromuscular blockade. 8 Maintenance 9 Emergence 10 Postoperative care 11 Perioperative mortality 12 See also 13 References 14 External links. Main article: History of general anesthesia. Clonidine premedication reduces the need for anaesthetic induction agents, as well as the need for volatile anaesthetic agents during maintenance of general anaesthesia, and the need for postoperative analgesics. Clonidine premedication also reduces postoperative shivering, postoperative nausea and vomiting and emergence delirium. Stage 1 Sta...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_anesthesia
*  Coma and General Anesthesia Demonstrate Important Similarities - New York Presbyterian Hospital
... The University Hospital of Columbia and Cornell. Find A Physician Return to Coma and General Anesthesia Demonstrate Important Similarities Overview More on Coma and General Anesthesia Demonstrate Important Similarities. Research and Clinical Trials Return to Coma and General Anesthesia Demonstrate Important Similarities Overview More on Coma and General Anesthesia Demonstrate Important Similarities. Clinical Services Return to Coma and General Anesthesia Demonstrate Important Similarities Overview More on Coma and General Anesthesia Demonstrate Important Similarities About Sleep Disorders. Coma and General Anesthesia Demonstrate Important Similarities NEJM Review Into Brain Circuit Mechanisms May Lead to More Accurate Coma Diagnosis and Improved Therapies NEW YORK Dec 30, 2010 The brain under general anesthesia isn't "asleep" as surgery patients are often told it is placed into a state that is a reversible coma, according to three neuroscientists who have published an extensive review of general anesthes...
http://nyp.org/news/hospital/coma-anesthesia-similarities.html
*  General Anesthesia | Gilroy CA | Michael E. McKeever
general anesthesia gilroy ca michael e mckeever logo about dr mike meet the team map and directions office tour financial and insurance request appointment reviews contact us practice events first visit patient forms patient gallery patient of the month brushing and flossing common problems emergency info about teeth dental health early dental care tmj tmd general treatment sedation dentistry general anesthesia games word search charts feedback glossary links cda ada general anesthesia general anesthesia is the term for anesthesia that puts a patient completely to sleep during a medical procedure the general anesthesia can be applied in a variety of ways including injection gas inhalation or through iv depending on the circumstances aside from keeping the patient unconscious the sedation also acts as an amnesiac causing the patient to forget the events immediately before and after the procedure general anesthesia is very safe under trained supervision but you should notify us of any medications the child is t...
http://drmichaelmckeever.com/treatment-information/general-anesthesia.aspx
*  General anaesthesia
... 'General anaesthesia' or 'general anesthesia' is a medically induced coma and loss of protective reflexes resulting from the administration of one or more general anaesthetic agents. Airway management. Eye management. Maintenance Emergence Postoperative care Perioperative mortality See also References External links. Clonidine premedication reduces the need for anaesthetic induction agents 5, as well as the need for volatile anaesthetic agents during maintenance of general anaesthesia, 6 and the need for postoperative analgesics. 7 Clonidine premedication also reduces postoperative shivering 8, postoperative nausea and vomiting and emergence delirium. Stage 1 Stage 1 anaesthesia, also known as the "induction", is the period between the initial administration of the induction agents and loss of consciousness. Stage 3 Stage 3, "surgical anaesthesia". Monitoring involves the use of several technologies to allow for a controlled induction of, maintenance of and emergence from general anaesthesia. With the lo...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_anaesthesia
*  General Anesthesia | UW Health | Madison
General Anesthesia. UW Health. Skip to Content UW Health SMPH. American Family Children's Hospital Home. Online Services. Bill Pay. Classes and Support Groups. Donate. Prescription Refill. Services. Clinics Hospitals. Search. Health Information. Health Information Home. General anesthesia suppresses many of your body's normal automatic functions, such as those that control breathing, heartbeat, circulation of the blood such as blood pressure, movements of the digestive system, and throat reflexes such as swallowing, coughing, or gagging that prevent foreign material from being inhaled into your lungs aspiration. After you are unconscious, anesthesia may be maintained with an inhaled anesthetic alone, with a combination of intravenous anesthetics, or a combination of inhaled and intravenous anesthetics. It may take some time before the effects of the anesthesia are completely gone. Risks and complications from general anesthesia Serious side effects of general anesthesia are uncommon in people who are otherwis...
http://uwhealth.org/health/topic/special/general-anesthesia/rt1584.html
*  General anesthesia | Adam Multimedia Encyclopedia | Maimonides Medical Center - www.MMCBrooklyn.o
General anesthesia. Maimonides Medical Center - www.MMCBrooklyn.org. Patient Portal. Patient Portal. Other Patient Services. Ambulatory Primary Care Cancer Center Geriatric Medicine Heart Vascular Center Infants Children's Hospital Obstetrics Gynecology Orthopedics Mental Health Stroke Center Surgery View All Services. Physician Videos Patient Testimonials General Info Tours "60 Seconds On" Series "In Action" Series "Day in the Life" Series Medical Surgical Procedures Career Information. General anesthesia. General anesthesia. Definition General anesthesia is medicine that puts you into a deep sleep so you do not feel pain during surgery. Description You will receive general anesthesia in a hospital or outpatient office. The doctor or nurse taking care of you can change how deeply asleep you are during the surgery. You will not move, feel any pain, or have any memories of the procedure because of this medicine. Children may need general anesthesia for a medical or dental procedure to handle any pain or anxiet...
http://maimonidesmed.org/Main/AdamMultimediaEncyclopedia/General-anesthesia-1007410.aspx
*  Anesthesia Guide, Treatments, Side Effects, Questions, Answers and News.
... Aesthetic Surgery. Belly Button Surgery. Cosmetic Surgery. Ear Surgery. Endoscopic Surgery. Eyelid Ptosis Surgery. Facial Implant Surgery. Plastic Surgery. Related Topics. Antibiotic. Mandible. Augmentation Mammoplasty. Periorbital. Board Certified. Electrolysis. Docusate. Ambulatory. Chill Tip. Aesthetic. anesthesia. Anesthesia. How much does it cost for general anesthesia. How long after anesthesia is the stomach fully back to normal. What type of anesthesia is typically used for a rhinoplasty procedure. How long does the effects of anesthesia take to wear off. Surgery anesthesia, can a person be tested ahead of time to see if they are allergic to the anesthesia. Is the anesthesia for wisdom teeth and gastroscopy the same. What is the most common anesthesia used for wisdom teeth extraction. How long does it take anesthesia to wear off. Is there a difference between general anesthesia and using a twilight. How often does anesthesia fail, when doctors bring patients into surgery. What is the best choise ...
http://bandsurgery.com/Cosmetic Surgery/Anesthesia/
*  Equine Anesthesia | Vetlearn
Vetlearn. Vetlearn. Veterinary Technician. Welcome to the all-new Vetlearn Vetlearn is becoming part of NAVC VetFolio. Starting in January 2015, Compendium and Veterinary Technician articles will be available on NAVC VetFolio. Anesthesia is useful for many veterinary procedures, including surgery, biopsy, radiography obtaining x-rays, and dental procedures. Your veterinarian may select sedation, local anesthesia, injectable general anesthesia, or inhaled general anesthesia to keep your horse pain-free during surgical or diagnostic procedures. For some patients, sedation and local anesthesia is an option. The medication used for sedation and local anesthesia does not cause the patient to fall asleep; when deep sedation or unconsciousness is required, general anesthesia is a better option. Horses generally require very heavy sedation before complete dental examinations. Sometimes, local anesthesia and general anesthesia are used together for the same procedure. For example, some veterinarians use general anesth...
http://vetlearn.com/reference-desk/care-guide/equine-anesthesia
*  Anaesthesia at a Glance 1st Edition | 9781405187565 | eCampus.com
Anaesthesia at a Glance 1st Edition. eCampus.com. FREE SHIPPING on orders over $59. RETURN YOUR RENTAL. MARKETPLACE. HELP DESK. Search FREE SHIPPING on orders over $59. CART 0 items. Rent Textbooks. Buy Textbooks. Sell Textbooks. Books. Anaesthesia at a Glance by Stone, Julian ; Fawcett, William. Edition: 1st. ISBN13: 9781405187565. ISBN10: 1405187565. Semester Dec 21 $42.26. $42.26 Add to Cart. Buy New Textbook. Add to Cart. $38.39 Add to Cart. Questions About This Book. Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label. How do rental returns work. Returning books is as easy as possible. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. What is included with this book. The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any...
http://ecampus.com/anaesthesia-glance-1st-stone-julian/bk/9781405187565
*  Anesthesia | Adam Multimedia Encyclopedia | Maimonides Medical Center - www.MMCBrooklyn.org
Anesthesia. Maimonides Medical Center - www.MMCBrooklyn.org. Other Patient Services. Physician Videos Patient Testimonials General Info Tours "60 Seconds On" Series "In Action" Series "Day in the Life" Series Medical Surgical Procedures Career Information. Anesthesia. Anesthesia. Definition Anesthesia is the delivery of medicine to prevent you from feeling pain during surgery and other medical or dental procedures. There are three main forms of anesthesia: Local anesthesia Regional anesthesia General anesthesia. Regional anesthesia numbs a large area, such as an entire arm, leg, or the entire lower half of your body. Two common types of regional anesthesia include: Epidural anesthesia Spinal anesthesia. This type of anesthesia causes you to lose feeling in the lower half of the body. It also causes you to lose feeling in the lower part of your body. General anesthesia is used to temporarily put you into a deep sleep so you don't feel pain during surgery. The medicines used during local and regional anesthesia...
http://maimonidesmed.org/Main/AdamMultimediaEncyclopedia/0a671d37-39b3-4a38-a18e-968620d3c81c.aspx
*  Anesthesia - What to Expect
... General Health. Anesthesia - What to Expect. Before Surgery. Eating and Drinking Before Anesthesia. After Surgery. You probably have plenty of questions about everything, including anesthesia like how the anesthesia is given and what you will experience. Eating and Drinking Before Anesthesia The anesthesiologist, surgeon, or someone on the nursing staff will give you instructions about not eating or drinking before surgery. If you don't meet the anesthesiologist before the day of the operation, you may want to ask your doctor or surgeon the following questions beforehand so you can have all the answers you need:. How long will it take me to fully wake up from general anesthesia or feel the area if local or regional anesthesia was used. In the Operating Room If general anesthesia is used, the anesthesiologist will start transitioning you from the normal awake state to the sleepy state of anesthesia. That way, you won't be awake when the IV is inserted for general anesthesia or when a shot is given to numb...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=ChildrensHealthNetwork&lic=142&cat_id=20120&article_set=48941&tracking=T_RelatedArticle
*  Anesthesia - What to Expect
... General Health. Anesthesia - What to Expect. Before Surgery. Eating and Drinking Before Anesthesia. After Surgery. You probably have plenty of questions about everything, including anesthesia like how the anesthesia is given and what you will experience. Eating and Drinking Before Anesthesia The anesthesiologist, surgeon, or someone on the nursing staff will give you instructions about not eating or drinking before surgery. If you don't meet the anesthesiologist before the day of the operation, you may want to ask your doctor or surgeon the following questions beforehand so you can have all the answers you need:. How long will it take me to fully wake up from general anesthesia or feel the area if local or regional anesthesia was used. In the Operating Room If general anesthesia is used, the anesthesiologist will start transitioning you from the normal awake state to the sleepy state of anesthesia. That way, you won't be awake when the IV is inserted for general anesthesia or when a shot is given to numb...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=CookChildrens&lic=403&cat_id=20120&article_set=48941&ps=204
*  General anesthesia linked to hemorrhage risk after cesarean delivery - The Doctor's Channel
General anesthesia linked to hemorrhage risk after cesarean delivery - The Doctor s Channel. The Doctor's Channel - Short Videos for Docs. Business of Medicine. Diabetes. Doc Life. Pain Management. Reuters Health News. Reuters Health • The Doctor s Channel Daily Newscast. Women’s Health. Featured. Video Case of the Week. Mini-Video Symposium on Stroke Risk Reduction in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation. Video of the Week. Best Practice Series. Diabetes. Improving Door-To-Needle Time and Systems of Care in Acute Ischemic Stroke. CME The Intersection of PCMH, Pain Management and Performance Improvement. Improving Door-To-Needle Time and Systems of Care in Acute Ischemic Stroke. General anesthesia linked to hemorrhage risk after cesarean delivery Reuters Health • The Doctor's Channel Daily Newscast. Anesthesiology, Family Medicine, Nurses/NP/PA, Ob/Gyn, Reuters Health • The Doctor's Channel Newscast, Women’s Health. NEW YORK Reuters Health – Women who receive general anesthesia for cesarean delivery have much high...
http://thedoctorschannel.com/view/general-anesthesia-linked-to-hemorrhage-risk-after-cesarean-delivery/
*  Anesthesia - Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula
Anesthesia. Anesthesia. Anesthesia General anesthesia, monitored anesthesia care, regional anesthesia, or local anesthesia will usually be used by the anesthesiologist or your surgeon for your procedure. Anesthesia terms General anesthesia results in unconsciousness. Monitored anesthesia care MAC usually involves the use of IV medication s during a procedure to relieve anxiety sedatives or pain analgesics. Regional anesthesia such as spinal, epidural, or nerve block involves the injection of medication s into the spinal area or around nerves to produce numbness. Local anesthesia involves the injection or medication around nerves to produce numbness in the area of the incision. You may develop adverse reaction s to the sedatives/analgesics that may result in nausea, vomiting, seizures, hallucinations, allergic reaction, skin rash, fever, cardiac arrhythmia requiring drug treatment, cardiac arrest, or coma. In addition to the above, risks of general anesthesia include but are not limited to: Dental damage Sore ...
http://chomp.org/patients-visitors/patient/preparing-for-visit/anesthesia/
*  Two Different Neural Pathways Regulate Loss And Regain Of Consciousness During General Anesthesia --
... ScienceDaily. Your source for the latest research news. Two Different Neural Pathways Regulate Loss And Regain Of Consciousness During General Anesthesia. Date: January 14, 2008 Source: University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Summary: Researchers have answered long-running questions about the way that anesthetics act on the body, by showing that the cellular pathway for emerging from anesthesia is different from the one that drugs take to put patients to sleep during operations. University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine researchers have answered long-running questions about the way that anesthetics act on the body, by showing that the cellular pathway for emerging from anesthesia is different from the one that drugs take to put patients to sleep during operations. University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "Two Different Neural Pathways Regulate Loss And Regain Of Consciousness During General Anesthesia." ScienceDaily. University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Two Different Neural Path...
http://sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080111175323.htm
*  Anesthesia - What to Expect
... General Health. Anesthesia - What to Expect. Before Surgery. Eating and Drinking Before Anesthesia. After Surgery. You probably have plenty of questions about everything, including anesthesia like how the anesthesia is given and what you will experience. Before Surgery Although you may be able to talk to the anesthesiologist a day or two prior to the operation, you might not meet until that day. Eating and Drinking Before Anesthesia The anesthesiologist, surgeon, or someone on the nursing staff will give you instructions about not eating or drinking before surgery. If you don't meet the anesthesiologist before the day of the operation, you may want to ask your doctor or surgeon the following questions beforehand so you can have all the answers you need:. How long will it take me to fully wake up from general anesthesia or feel the area if local or regional anesthesia was used. In the Operating Room If general anesthesia is used, the anesthesiologist will start transitioning you from the normal awake stat...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=NiswongerChildrens_Hospital&lic=362&cat_id=20120&article_set=48941&tracking=T_RelatedArticle
*  Anesthesia - What to Expect
... Children's Health. Anesthesia - What to Expect. Before Surgery. After Surgery. You probably have plenty of questions about everything from how the anesthesia is given, to what your child will experience, to where you're allowed to be. Before Surgery Although you may be able to talk to the anesthesiologist a day or two prior to the operation, you may not meet until that day. If you don't meet the anesthesiologist before the day of the operation, you may want to ask your doctor or surgeon these questions days, or even weeks, beforehand so you and your child can have all the answers you need:. How long will it take my child to fully wake up from general anesthesia or feel the area if local or regional anesthesia was used. In the Operating Room If general anesthesia is used, the anesthesiologist will start transitioning your child from the normal awake state to the sleepy state of anesthesia. When using general anesthesia, the anesthesiologist will monitor your child's vital signs, continue to deliver anesth...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=Virtua&lic=55&cat_id=178&article_set=48936&tracking=P_RelatedArticle
*  Types of Anesthesia | Seattle Children’s Hospital
Types of Anesthesia. Seattle Children’s Hospital. Classes and Community. All Classes. Safety and Wellness. Safety Resources. Wellness Resources. Safety and Wellness. Safety and Wellness Types of Anesthesia. If your child is having general anesthesia, the anesthesiologist will be there before, during, and after the operation to monitor the anesthetic medications and ensure your child is constantly receiving the right dose. relieve anxiety keep your child asleep minimize pain during surgery and relieve pain afterward using drugs called analgesics. A child who receives regional anesthesia is usually asleep before the procedure is done. In kids, regional and general anesthesia are often combined, except in very special circumstances. The time required to recover from the numbing effect will vary depending on the type of regional anesthetic used. If your child is having an outpatient surgery or procedure in a clinic or doctor's office such as the dentist or dermatologist, this is probably the type of anesthetic th...
http://seattlechildrens.org/kids-health/parents/doctors-and-hospitals/resources-for-parents/types-of-anesthesia/?dn=seattlechildrens&kid=48937&cat_id=178
*  Breastfeeding And General Anesthesia Please Help - Circle of Moms
... Blogger SoundOff: Our Bloggers Show Us Their Pregnancy Style. Topics. Family Home. Single Moms. Family Fun. Baby Names. @ All Communities Welcome to Circle of Moms!. Young moms aged 20-30 Working Moms Recipe Swap Moms With School Age Kids Toddler Moms Stay at Home Moms Toddlers Single Moms After Pregnancy: Babies and Infants. Top Communities Stories. Baby #3.... Baby Showers Baby Names Maternity Clothes Childbirth Breastfeeding Top Pregnancy Stories. Cool Boy Names. Kid-Friendly Recipes Cooking With Kids Kid Activities Kid Parties Holidays Cookbook Popular Recipes Quick Easy Recipes Slow Cooker Recipes Add a New Recipe Top Food Fun Stories. Family Fun Family Home Family Relationships Single Moms Staying Sane The Scoop Parenting News Funny Top Family Life Stories. 2015 POPSUGAR Inc. PopSugar Living PopSugar Moms. Moms of Preemies. BreastFeeding and General Anesthesia Please Help BreastFeeding and General Anesthesia Please Help Kristina - posted on 02/22/2010 3 moms ...
http://circleofmoms.com/moms-of-preemies/breastfeeding-and-general-anesthesia-please-help-488662
*  Anesthesia
... + Explore Rochester Regional Health System. Rochester General Hospital Maps Directions. Centers Services. Newark-Wayne Community Hospital Maps Directions. Centers & Services. Rochester Regional Key Services 65+ Primary Care Locations. Behavioral Health & Substance Abuse Care. Centers Services. Surgical Services. Browse Services A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Search All Services Centers. Rochester General Hospital. Newark-Wayne Community Hospital. Medical Library. Health Library. Anesthesia Anesthesia Types of Anesthesia and Your Anesthesiologist Types of anesthesia During surgery, you will be given some form of anesthesia -- medicine administered for the relief of pain and sensation during surgery. The anesthesiologist will review the patient s medical condition and history to plan the appropriate anesthetic for surgery. The type of anesthesia you will receive will depend on the type of surgery and your medical condition. The different types of anesthesia are as follows: Local anesth...
http://rochestergeneral.org/centers-and-services/surgical-services/about-rghs-surgical-services/about-your-surgery/anesthesia/
*  Deaths from anesthesia during childbirth plummet
... January 6, 2011 Deaths from anesthesia during childbirth plummet January 6, 2011 The number of women who die from complications of anesthesia during childbirth has plummeted 59 percent over the last two decades thanks to improved monitoring and better medical techniques, according to a recent study. Hawkins examined 12 years of anesthesia-related maternal deaths from 1991 to 2002 and compared them to similar data from 1979 to 1990. The study, published in the January 2011 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology, pointed out that while the numbers of women dying under general anesthesia has decreased, those dying under regional anesthetic spinals and epidurals have risen slightly to about 3.8 out of every million receiving the anesthesia. "We focused our attention on the riskier technique general anesthesia and we brought those risks down," Hawkins said. During the 1970s and 80s, 17 women died under general anesthesia for every one death under regional anesthesia. "General anesthesia now seems just as safe as a ...
http://phys.org/news/2011-01-deaths-anesthesia-childbirth-plummet.html
*  Search › anesthesia pharmacology | Quizlet
Search anesthesia pharmacology. Quizlet. . Quizlet. . .  Create a Study Set. Log In .  Log In with Google.  Log In with Facebook. Keep me logged in. Forgot password. Forgot password. Sign Up.  Google Sign In Give us Feedback. If you re having trouble, want to report a bug, provide a suggestion, or just want to say hello please fill out the form below. Choose Type Question / Need Help Suggestion Bug Report Just Saying Thanks Other Comment / Feedback. anesthesia pharmacology.  500+ Study Sets 500+ Sets. Image sets only. ANESTHESIA PHARMACOLOGY: Part I. 164 terms By debbieprichard . 164 terms Preview . Anesthesia Pharmacology. 42 terms Preview . 3 Anesthesia Pharmacology Final. 35 terms Preview . Anesthesia Pharmacology. 35 terms Preview . ANESTHESIA PHARMACOLOGY: Part 2. 263 terms By debbieprichard. 263 terms Preview . Anesthesia pharmacology. 40 terms Preview . Anesthesia Pharmacology...
https://quizlet.com/subject/anesthesia-pharmacology/
*  Types of Anesthesia | Seattle Children’s Hospital
Types of Anesthesia. Seattle Children’s Hospital. 206-987-2000, 866-987-2000 toll-free. Find a Doctor. Classes and Community. All Classes. Community Programs. Safety and Wellness. Safety Resources. Wellness Resources. Safety and Wellness. Safety and Wellness Types of Anesthesia. About Anesthesia Anesthesia is broken down into three main categories: local, regional, and general, all of which affect the nervous system in some way and can be administered using various methods and different medications. Local anesthesia. Local anesthesia lasts for a short period of time and is often used for minor outpatient procedures when patients come in for surgery and can go home that same day. The medicine used can numb the area during the procedure and for a short time afterwards to help control post-surgery discomfort. Regional anesthesia. Regional anesthesia is generally used to make a person more comfortable during and after the surgical procedure. Regional and general anesthesia are often combined. General anesthesia. ...
http://seattlechildrens.org/kids-health/teens/body/getting-medical-care/types-of-anesthesia/?dn=seattlechildrens&kid=48942&lic=400&cat_id=20120
*  Anesthesia - What to Expect
... Cancer Care Center. Health Information. Patient and Family Centered Care. Health Information. Asthma Center. Cancer Center. Diabetes Center. You probably have plenty of questions about everything from how the anesthesia is given, to what your child will experience, to where you're allowed to be. How long will it take my child to fully wake up from general anesthesia or feel the area if local or regional anesthesia was used. In the Operating Room If general anesthesia is used, the anesthesiologist will start transitioning your child from the normal awake state to the sleepy state of anesthesia. When using general anesthesia, the anesthesiologist will monitor your child's vital signs, continue to deliver anesthesia, and keep your child as comfortable as possible throughout the operation. To help your child breathe and/or to help deliver general anesthesia during the operation, the anesthesiologist may use an endotracheal tube a plastic tube that's placed into the windpipe through the mouth or nose or laryn...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=KosairChildrensHospital&lic=407&cat_id=20661&article_set=48936&tracking=P_RelatedArticle
*  Anesthesia - What to Expect
... About MLH. Contact MLH. 1.866.CALL.MLH or 484.580.1000. Bryn Mawr Hospital. Health Center: Broomall. Research at MLH. General Health Infections Emotions & Behavior Growth & Development Condition Centers Recipes Pregnancy & Newborns Pregnancy Calendar Positive Parenting First Aid & Safety Medical Problems Doctors & Hospitals Q & A En espa ol For Kids. Cancer Center. General Health. Cancer Center. You probably have plenty of questions about everything from how the anesthesia is given, to what your child will experience, to where you're allowed to be. What happens will, of course, depend on the type of procedure your child is having and the kind of anesthesia that will be used, either:. How long will it take my child to fully wake up from general anesthesia or feel the area if local or regional anesthesia was used. In the Operating Room If general anesthesia is used, the anesthesiologist will start transitioning your child from the normal awake state to the sleepy state of anesthesia. When using general ane...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=MainLineHealth&lic=34&cat_id=178&article_set=48936&ps=104
*  Anesthesia - What to Expect
... General Health. Anesthesia - What to Expect. Before Surgery. Eating and Drinking Before Anesthesia. You probably have plenty of questions about everything, including anesthesia like how the anesthesia is given and what you will experience. Before Surgery Although you may be able to talk to the anesthesiologist a day or two prior to the operation, you might not meet until that day. Eating and Drinking Before Anesthesia The anesthesiologist, surgeon, or someone on the nursing staff will give you instructions about not eating or drinking before surgery. If you don't meet the anesthesiologist before the day of the operation, you may want to ask your doctor or surgeon the following questions beforehand so you can have all the answers you need:. How long will it take me to fully wake up from general anesthesia or feel the area if local or regional anesthesia was used. In the Operating Room If general anesthesia is used, the anesthesiologist will start transitioning you from the normal awake state to the sleepy...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=AdvocateHealth&lic=493&cat_id=20120&article_set=48941&ps=204
*  Anesthesia - What to Expect
... General Health. Anesthesia - What to Expect. Before Surgery. Eating and Drinking Before Anesthesia. You probably have plenty of questions about everything, including anesthesia like how the anesthesia is given and what you will experience. Before Surgery Although you may be able to talk to the anesthesiologist a day or two prior to the operation, you might not meet until that day. Eating and Drinking Before Anesthesia The anesthesiologist, surgeon, or someone on the nursing staff will give you instructions about not eating or drinking before surgery. Questions and Answers To ensure your safety during the surgery, you'll need to answer all of the anesthesiologist's questions as honestly and thoroughly as possible. If you don't meet the anesthesiologist before the day of the operation, you may want to ask your doctor or surgeon the following questions beforehand so you can have all the answers you need:. How long will it take me to fully wake up from general anesthesia or feel the area if local or regional...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=American_Academy_of_Family_Physicians&lic=44&cat_id=20120&article_set=48941&tracking=T_RelatedArticle
*  Health Library - Columbus Regional Health | Types of Anesthesia and Your Anesthesiologist
Health Library - Columbus Regional Health. Types of Anesthesia and Your Anesthesiologist Preparation Why Columbus Regional. Important Contact Info. Conditions Services All Conditions. Conditions & Services. Online Services. Types of Anesthesia and Your Anesthesiologist Types of anesthesia During surgery, you will be given some form of anesthesia, which is medication administered for the relief of pain and sensation during surgery. The anesthesiologist will review the patient's medical condition and history to plan the appropriate anesthetic for surgery. The type of anesthesia you will receive will depend on the type of surgery and your medical condition. The different types of anesthesia include the following: Local anesthesia Local anesthesia is an anesthetic agent given to temporarily stop the sense of pain in a particular area of the body. Regional anesthesia Regional anesthesia is used to numb only the portion of the body that will receive the surgical procedure. The epidural anesthetic is similar to a sp...
http://crh.org/conditions-and-services/health-library.aspx?t=85&c=P01391
*  Veterinary anesthesia
... includes anesthesia of the major species: dogs, cats, horses, cattle, sheep, goats, and pigs, as well as all other animals requiring veterinary care such as birds, pocket pet s, and wildlife. Specialization in anesthesia Anesthesia technicians Application in animals Techniques in small animals Techniques in horses and ruminants Exotic pets Anesthetic agents Gallery See also References External links. 2 The ACVA was recognized by the AVMA in 1975, despite attempts by the AVMA to include anesthesia as a subspecialty of surgery or medicine. Anesthesia technicians. Techniques in small animals. Cats and dogs are frequently anesthetized for surgical procedures. Small animals are most often placed under general anesthesia due to the types of procedures typically performed, the small size of the patient, their suitability to general anesthesia, and the greater degree of control. For sick dogs and cats, it was 1 in 75 and 1 in 71 respectively. 8 Techniques in horses and ruminants. Some procedures may require gene...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veterinary_anesthesia
*  Types of Anesthesia
... General Anesthesia. Regional Anesthesia. Local Anesthesia. Will My Child Get a Needle. What Type of Anesthesia Will My Child Get. If your child is to undergo a surgery or procedure, it can reassure you to understand how the various types of anesthesia work to make the experience more comfortable. If your child is having general anesthesia, the anesthesiologist will be there before, during, and after the operation to monitor the anesthetic medications and ensure your child is constantly receiving the right dose. relax the muscles, which helps to keep your child still block out the memory of the surgery After surgery, the anesthesiologist reverses the anesthesia process to help your child "wake up." It usually takes about 45 minutes to an hour for kids to recover completely from general anesthesia. During recovery, your child is still under the care of the anesthesiologist. A child who receives regional anesthesia is usually asleep before the procedure is done. If regional anesthesia is appropriate for you...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=ChildrensHealthNetwork&lic=142&cat_id=176&article_set=48937&tracking=P_RelatedArticle
*  Types of Anesthesia
... General Anesthesia. Regional Anesthesia. Local Anesthesia. Will My Child Get a Needle. What Type of Anesthesia Will My Child Get. If your child is to undergo a surgery or procedure, it can reassure you to understand how the various types of anesthesia work to make the experience more comfortable. If your child is having general anesthesia, the anesthesiologist will be there before, during, and after the operation to monitor the anesthetic medications and ensure your child is constantly receiving the right dose. relax the muscles, which helps to keep your child still block out the memory of the surgery After surgery, the anesthesiologist reverses the anesthesia process to help your child "wake up." It usually takes about 45 minutes to an hour for kids to recover completely from general anesthesia. During recovery, your child is still under the care of the anesthesiologist. A child who receives regional anesthesia is usually asleep before the procedure is done. If regional anesthesia is appropriate for you...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=ChildrensPhysicianNetwork&lic=142&cat_id=178&article_set=48937&ps=104
*  Types of Anesthesia
... KidsHealth. Children's Health. Types of Anesthesia. General Anesthesia. Regional Anesthesia. Local Anesthesia. Will My Child Get a Needle. What Type of Anesthesia Will My Child Get. If your child is to undergo a surgery or procedure, it can reassure you to understand how the various types of anesthesia work to make the experience more comfortable. If your child is having general anesthesia, the anesthesiologist will be there before, during, and after the operation to monitor the anesthetic medications and ensure your child is constantly receiving the right dose. relax the muscles, which helps to keep your child still block out the memory of the surgery After surgery, the anesthesiologist reverses the anesthesia process to help your child "wake up." It usually takes about 45 minutes to an hour for kids to recover completely from general anesthesia. During recovery, your child is still under the care of the anesthesiologist. A child who receives regional anesthesia is usually asleep before the procedure is...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?dn=Virtua&lic=55&cat_id=20661&article_set=48937&ps=104
*  Types of Anesthesia
... East Tennessee Children's Hospital. East Tennessee Children's Hospital. For Teens Home. General Health. About Anesthesia Anesthesia is broken down into three main categories: local, regional, and general, all of which affect the nervous system in some way and can be administered using various methods and different medications. Local anesthesia lasts for a short period of time and is often used for minor outpatient procedures when patients come in for surgery and can go home that same day. The medicine used can numb the area during the procedure and for a short time afterwards to help control post-surgery discomfort. Regional anesthesia is generally used to make a person more comfortable during and after the surgical procedure. With general anesthesia, the anesthesiologist uses a combination of various medications to do things like:. relieve anxiety keep you asleep minimize pain during surgery and relieve pain afterward using drugs called analgesics relax the muscles, which helps to keep you still block o...
http://kidshealth.org/PageManager.jsp?lic=6&dn=EastTennesseeChildrens_Hospital&article_set=48942&cat_id=20120
*  ANAESTHESIA IN HYPERTENSION PPT Powerpoint Presentations and Slides - View and Download
... Showing results for query " ANAESTHESIA IN HYPERTENSION PowerPoint PPT Presentations and Slides ". Class I : High cardiac risk patients undergoing vascular surgery should have BB. Anaesthesia for liver disease. Anaesthesia for liver disease. Summary Associated with high perioperative morbidity and mortality. http://gaslog.org.uk/download/?id=120. systemic hypertension and ischemic heart disease in the aetiology of obesity cardiomyopathy. PHARMACOLOGY OF RESPIRATORY DRUGS - Virgin Media. PHARMACOLOGY OF RESPIRATORY DRUGS Susanne Young May 04’ content Physiology/ sites of action Review drugs in use Main considerations in anaesthesia Common ... http://homepage.ntlworld.com/william.mcculloch/Anaesthetic%20trainees/Files/PHARMACOLOGY%20OF%20RESPIRATORY%20DRUGS.ppt. PowerPoint Presentation. > Renal disease. > Hypertension. Contd Pregnancy related ... Complications of Anesthesia - University of Ottawa. Hypertension. http://www.med.uottawa.ca/anesthesia/assets/documents/anesthesia-assistants/Complications of Ane...
http://pptsearch365.com/ANAESTHESIA-IN-HYPERTENSION.html
*  Ask an Expert: Is There An Alternative To Anesthesia?
Ask an Expert: Is There An Alternative To Anesthesia. NetWellness is a global, community service providing quality, unbiased health information from our partner university faculty. NetWellness is commercial-free and does not accept advertising. Wednesday, October 7, 2015. Home HealthTopics Health Centers Reference Library Research. Join us on Facebook Share on Facebook. Tweet. Share. Search. Advanced. Anesthesia. Is There An Alternative To Anesthesia. 02/09/2009. Question: My husband is 59 years old and has alzheimers. He does not communicate and does not have control of his functions. He has a hernia in his groin and there is talk of a colonoscopy. The only way this could be done is with anesthesia. I am concerned about him being put to sleep as it seems to progress his Alzheimer`s when he was put to sleep for gall bladder surgery in 2003. He is on Namenda and Razydine. He has had alzheimer`s 10 years. Is there an alternative. Answer: Thanks for your question. This is a difficult situation because there is e...
https://netwellness.org/question.cfm/70179.htm
*  Anesthesia: Previous Questions and Answers
... NetWellness is a global, community service providing quality, unbiased health information from our partner university faculty. NetWellness is commercial-free and does not accept advertising. Tuesday, October 6, 2015. Home HealthTopics Health Centers Reference Library Research. Join us on Facebook Share on Facebook. Tweet. Share. Search. Advanced. Anesthesia: Questions and Answers 1 to 25 of 535 Result Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next. Could I be Allergic to Anesthesia. 12/05/2011. Local Anesthetic Not Working 12/05/2011. Can Anesthesia Cause My Hair to Fall Out. 10/25/2011. Hair loss 10/18/2011. Does anesthesia cause hair loss. 10/18/2011. Orthopedic work on 9 month old 05/26/2011. Headache on Day 3 After Giving Birth. 03/18/2011. Anesthesia and Cocaine 02/28/2011. Neurological Complication 01/13/2011. Panic Attack and General Anesthesia 12/14/2010. Anesthesia and Throat Polyps 12/08/2010. Shortened Life Span After Anesthesia 12/08/2010. Blood Chemistry and Anesthesia 12/03/2010. Flying Shortly After Surg...
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*  General anesthesia - Mayo Clinic
... By Mayo Clinic Staff. Your doctor will discuss with you the risks and benefits of the various options for anesthesia. Smoking Obstructive sleep apnea Obesity High blood pressure Diabetes Other medical conditions involving your heart, lungs or kidneys Medications, such as aspirin, that can increase bleeding History of heavy alcohol use Drug allergies History of adverse reactions to anesthesia. Discuss your medications with your doctor. Discuss the types of dietary supplements you take with your doctor before your surgery. If you have sleep apnea, discuss your condition with your doctor. During general anesthesia. After general anesthesia. Accessed Sept. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2011. http://www.accessmedicine.com/resourceTOC.aspx?resourceID=28. Accessed Sept. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill; 2012. http://www.accessmedicine.com/resourceTOC.aspx?resourceID=723. Accessed Sept. Accessed Sept. Lifeline to Modern Medicine. http://www.lifelinetomodernmedicine.com/Who-Is-An-Anesthesiologist/Types-of...
http://mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/anesthesia/basics/definition/prc-20014786?p=1
*  .. List of General Post Anesthesia Complications .. Post Anesthesia Complications .. Share this: ..
List of General Post Anesthesia Complications. July 18, 2013. Mark Kaire. Medical Injuries. No comments. Depending on the patient’s risk factors, complications can occur in patients administered with post general anesthesia. The patient’s age and current health can dictate how the patient will respond. If the patients have heart, lung, circulatory, or nervous disorders, and previous reactions to anesthesia, risk factors can increase. Post Anesthesia Complications. While the overall risks associated with general anesthesia are low, serious complications can result to include heart attack, stroke, brain damage, and death. These risks appear to appear in every 1:1000 and 1:100,000 with infants and patients older than 70 being at a greater risk. The following additional complications may also occur. • Awareness during surgery – An estimated 30,000 patients per year in the United States wakes up during the surgery. The patients appear to be paralyzed with regard to motion, but otherwise are awake and aware...
http://floridamedicalmalpracticelaws.com/list-general-post-anesthesia-complications/
*  Anesthesia for Pain Relief - FamilyEducation.com
... Original URL: http://pregnancy.familyeducation.com/pain-management/general-anesthesia/66187.html. Anesthesia for Pain Relief. Pudendal blocks This type of regional anesthesia involves injecting a local anesthetic into the vagina where the pudendal nerves are located to reduce pain in the vagina and perineum. The pudendal needle is quite long and thick, so before the injection is given, a cold anesthetic spray is applied to the area. The anesthetic has no effect on the baby and can be used with other medications. It takes effect very quickly and is sometimes used just before birth to aid an assisted forceps delivery. General anesthesia Most cesareans are conducted using regional anesthesia. However, in some cases general anesthesia, where the mother is put to sleep, is necessary. This may be because of a failure of regional anesthesia, blood-clotting problems in the mother, an infection in the mother's bloodstream, or persistent fetal distress. The procedure Precautions are taken to minimize the risks to ...
http://pregnancy.familyeducation.com/pain-management/general-anesthesia/66187.html?for_printing=1

Preventive analgesia: Preventive analgesia is a practice aimed at reducing short- and long-term post-surgery pain. Activity in the body's pain signalling system during surgery produces "sensitization"; that is, it increases the intensity of post-operative pain.General anaesthesia: General anaesthesia (or general anesthesia) is a medically induced coma and loss of protective reflexes resulting from the administration of one or more general anaesthetic agents. A variety of medications may be administered, with the overall aim of ensuring unconsciousness, amnesia, analgesia, relaxation of skeletal muscles, and loss of control of reflexes of the autonomic nervous system.Anesthesia cart: Anesthesia carts are hospital devices used to store tools that are necessary for aid during procedures that require administration of anesthesia. Anesthesia refers to the use of drugs to subdue a patient's mind and prevent him or her from feeling any pain during a surgical operation.Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia: Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia (CSE) is a regional anaesthetic technique, which combines the benefits of both spinal anaesthesia and epidural anaesthesia and analgesia. The spinal component gives a rapid onset of a predictable block.Spinal anaesthesia: Spinal anaesthesia (or spinal anesthesia), also called spinal analgesia, spinal block or subarachnoid block (SAB), is a form of regional anaesthesia involving injection of a local anaesthetic into the subarachnoid space, generally through a fine needle, usually 9 cm long (3.5 inches).Paracervical block: A paracervical block is an anesthetic procedure used in obstetrics and gynecology, in which a local anesthetic is injected into between two to six sites at a depth of 3–7 mm alongside the vaginal portion of the cervix in the vaginal fornices.paracervical block By Robert Nadelberg.Opioid: Opioids are substances that act on the nervous system in a similar way to opiates such as morphine and codeine. In a medical context the term usually indicates medications that are artificially made rather than extracted from opium.Local anesthetic: Local anesthetic (LA) is a medication that causes reversible absence of pain sensation, although other senses are often affected as well. Also, when it is used on specific nerve pathways (local anesthetic nerve block), paralysis (loss of muscle power) can be achieved as well.BupivacaineOhmefentanylInternational Federation of Dental Anesthesiology Societies: The International Federation of Dental Anesthesiology Societies (IFDAS) is a professional association established in 1976. IFDAS is devoted solely to promoting the safe and effective use of sedation and anesthesia by educationally qualified dentists for their patients.Pain scale: A pain scale measures a patient's pain intensity or other features. Pain scales are based on self-report, observational (behavioral), or physiological data.Morphia (disambiguation): Morphia, also called morphine, is a highly potent opiate analgesic drug.Nerve blockInhalational anaesthetic: An inhalational anaesthetic is a chemical compound possessing general anaesthetic properties that can be delivered via inhalation. They are administered by anaesthetists (a term which includes anaesthesiologists, nurse anaesthetists, and anaesthesiologist assistants) through an anaesthesia mask, laryngeal mask airway or tracheal tube connected to an anaesthetic vaporiser and an anaesthetic delivery system.Propofol infusion syndrome: Propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS) is a rare syndrome which affects patients undergoing long-term treatment with high doses of the anaesthetic and sedative drug propofol. It can lead to cardiac failure, rhabdomyolysis, metabolic acidosis, and kidney failure, and is often fatal.Compound analgesic: Compound analgesics are those with multiple active ingredients; they include many of the stronger prescription analgesics.Lidocaine: lignocaineNitrous oxide and oxygen: A mix of nitrous oxide 50% and oxygen 50% is a medical analgesic gas, commonly known as Entonox (a registered trademark of BOC) or Nitronox, or colloquially as "gas and air", and is frequently used in pre-hospital care, childbirth and emergency medicine situations by medical professionals such as doctors, nurses, midwives and paramedics.SufentanilNational Dental Board of Anesthesiology: The National Dental Board of Anesthesiology (NDBA) is an American professional association established in 2001 by the American Dental Society of Anesthesiology. Based in Chicago, NDBA is the world's largest national dental board devoted to sedation and anesthesia.Cancer pain: Pain in cancer may arise from a tumor compressing or infiltrating nearby body parts; from treatments and diagnostic procedures; or from skin, nerve and other changes caused by a hormone imbalance or immune response. Most chronic (long-lasting) pain is caused by the illness and most acute (short-term) pain is caused by treatment or diagnostic procedures.Lanicemine: Lanicemine (AZD6765) is a low-trapping NMDA receptor antagonist developed by AstraZeneca, which was being studied for the management of severe and treatment-resistant depression. It was originally developed as a neuroprotective agent, but was redeveloped as an antidepressant following the observation that the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine has potent antidepressant effects, but also has hallucinogenic side effects which make it unsuitable for use as an antidepressant in most circumstances.Anesthesia: In the practice of medicine, especially surgery, and dentistry, anesthesia (or anaesthesia) is an induced, temporary state with one or more of the following characteristics: analgesia (relief from or prevention of pain), paralysis (extreme muscle relaxation), amnesia (loss of memory), and unconsciousness. An anesthetic is an agent that causes anaesthesia.Procedural sedation and analgesia: Procedural sedation and analgesia, previously referred to as conscious sedation, is defined as "a technique of administering sedatives or dissociative agents with or without analgesics to induce a state that allows the patient to tolerate unpleasant procedures while maintaining cardiorespiratory function."Lower segment Caesarean section: A lower (uterine) segment Caesarean section (LSCS) is the most commonly used type of Caesarean section used today. It includes a transverse cut just above the edge of the bladder and results in less blood loss and is easier to repair than other types of Caesarean sections.PinnacleHealth System: $1 billion (2013)Placebo-controlled study: Placebo-controlled studies are a way of testing a medical therapy in which, in addition to a group of subjects that receives the treatment to be evaluated, a separate control group receives a sham "placebo" treatment which is specifically designed to have no real effect. Placebos are most commonly used in blinded trials, where subjects do not know whether they are receiving real or placebo treatment.HalothanePostoperative nausea and vomiting: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is an unpleasant complication affecting about a third of the 10% of the population undergoing general anaesthesia each year. A 2008 study compared 121 Japanese patients who experienced PONV after being given the general anesthetic propofol to 790 people who were free of post-operative nausea after receiving it.IsobutyramideNordli's Cabinet: Nordli's Cabinet governed Norway between 15 January 1976 and 4 February 1981. The Labour Party cabinet was led by Odvar Nordli.EPENonbenzodiazepine: Nonbenzodiazepines (sometimes referred to colloquially as "Z-drugs") are a class of psychoactive drugs that are very benzodiazepine-like in nature. Nonbenzodiazepines pharmacodynamics are almost entirely the same as benzodiazepine drugs and therefore employ similar benefits, side-effects, and risks.Theories of general anaesthetic action: A general anaesthetic (or anesthetic) is a drug that brings about a reversible loss of consciousness. These drugs are generally administered by an anaesthetist/anaesthesiologist in order to induce or maintain general anaesthesia to facilitate surgery.Lidocaine/prilocaineGas cylinder: A gas cylinder or tank is a pressure vessel used to store gases at above atmospheric pressure. High-pressure gas cylinders are also called bottles.RomifidineEnfluraneHistory of tracheal intubation: Tracheal intubation (usually simply referred to as intubation), an invasive medical procedure, is the placement of a flexible plastic catheter into the trachea. For millennia, tracheotomy was considered the most reliable (and most risky) method of tracheal intubation.Intraoperative radiation therapyHypoalgesia: Hypoalgesia or hypalgesia denotes a decreased sensitivity to painful stimuli.Infiltration analgesia: Infiltration analgesia is deposition of an analgesic drug close to the apex of a tooth so that it can diffuse to reach the nerve entering the apical foramina.Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Phenylpiperidine: Phenylpiperidine is a chemical compound with a phenyl moiety directly attached to piperidine. There are a variety of pharmacological effects associated some phenylpiperidines including morphine-like activity or other central nervous system effects.ClonidineMidazolamAlcohol tolerance: Alcohol tolerance refers to the bodily responses to the functional effects of ethanol in alcoholic beverages. This includes direct tolerance, speed of recovery from insobriety and resistance to the development of alcoholism.Klumpke paralysisConcentration effect: In the study of inhaled anesthetics, the concentration effect is the increase in the rate that the Fa(alveolar concentration)/Fi(inspired concentration) ratio rises as the alveolar concentration of that gas is increased. In simple terms, the higher the concentration of gas administered, the faster the alveolar concentration of that gas approaches the inspired concentration.SC-17599Cervical dilation: Cervical dilation (or cervical dilatation) is the opening of the cervix, the entrance to the uterus, during childbirth, miscarriage, induced abortion, or gynecological surgery. Cervical dilation may occur naturally, or may be induced by surgical or medical means.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingPiritramideHydromorphonePrimary Health Care and Resource Centre: The Primary Health Care and Resource Center (PHCRC) is in the rural village of Chapagaun, Lalitpur in Nepal. Chapagaun is in the wider Kathmandu Valley.Qualia: In philosophy, qualia ( or ; singular form: quale) are individual instances of subjective, conscious experience. The term "qualia" derives from the Latin neuter plural form (qualia) of the Latin adjective quālis () meaning "of what sort" or "of what kind").Quantitative electroencephalography: Quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) is a field concerned with the numerical analysis of electroencephalography data and associated behavioral correlates.Revised Cardiac Risk Index

(1/8) An evaluation of obstetrical analgesia.

Relief of pain and safety of mother and child are fundamentals in obstetrical analgesia. Elimination of those drugs which are ineffective or dangerous is the best guide to proper medication. Morphine, codeine, or similar opium derivatives should be avoided as they depress fetal respiration. Barbiturates have the same fault, despite their popularity. Demerol in small dosage is safe and effective. Scopolamine yields excellent results with safety. Magnesium sulfate potentiates and reinforces the action of scopolamine and involves no danger. This combination of drugs may be used by any competent general practitioner in the home or hospital.  (+info)

(2/8) Trifluoroethylvinyl ether (fluoromar); a preliminary report on clinical experience and animal experiment.

In observations of 80 cases in which Fluoromar was used for inhalation anesthesia it was noted that induction was rapid; maintenance although labile, was usually smooth; and recovery of reflexes was rapid. Anesthetic complications were minimal, and postanesthetic complications were limited to nausea and vomiting in no greater incidence than that expected to follow the use of most inhalation anesthetic agents. Fluoromar produces rapid, and not particularly unpleasant, loss of consciousness, and will produce complete anesthesia without supplement. However, the muscular relaxation afforded by Fluoromar is not complete, and delayed recovery from anesthesia may follow attempts to produce relaxation by deepening too greatly the level of anesthesia. The inflammability of Fluoromar is less than that of other inhalation agents.  (+info)

(3/8) Thiopentone and buthalitone: the relationship between depth of anaesthesia, plasma concentration and plasma protein binding.

For 24 hr. after intravenous administration of buthalitone or thiopentone, plasma concentrations in young human subjects have been followed. Buthalitone was distributed to the tissues more rapidly but was metabolized at a slower rate than thiopentone. The relationships between these findings and differences in plasma protein binding and oil/water partition coefficients were studied. It is suggested that some of the differences observed in potency between the substances is a reflection of differences in their modes of distribution. No relationship was found between speed of recovery from anaesthesia and plasma barbiturate concentrations.  (+info)

(4/8) Anaesthesia in new-born animals.

Pentobarbitone was more toxic to new-born than to adult rabbits and rats, produced a longer loss of righting reflex in new-born animals but did not anaesthetize them effectively in less than toxic doses. Urethane did not anaesthetize new-born animals in doses which anaesthetized adults. Ether produced loss of righting reflex at lower concentrations for new-born than for adults, but the new-born animals became anaesthetized more slowly.  (+info)

(5/8) The influence of thiopentone anaesthesia on the blood lipid and blood sugar level.

Thiopentone anaesthesia in dogs and rats was accompanied by a sharp fall in blood nonesterified fatty acids and a small increase in blood sugar. No pronounced changes in the blood concentrations of cholesterol, phospholipids or fatty acid esters were observed. Ether anaesthesia had no effect on the blood non-esterified fatty acids in rats. The fall in non-esterified fatty acids during thiopentone anaesthesia is therefore not related to the state of anaesthesia itself.  (+info)

(6/8) General anesthesia for eye operations. A consideration of some pertinent factors involved in administration.

In the administration of general anesthesia for surgical operations on the eye, care must be taken to consider the patient's total physiological condition. A patient with eye problems may have generalized changes of more than moderate extent. Most patients are in the age group in which the incidence of cardiovascular and pulmonary problems is relatively high. If the patient is in a younger age group, perhaps diabetes or the collagen diseases must be suspected. Care must be taken to prevent undue strains to the eye during and immediately after the operation. Constant care and an awareness of possible complication is necessary for successful management in these cases.  (+info)

(7/8) Local anesthesia in ophthalmology.

With local anesthesia for intraocular operations, postoperative agitation, nausea and vomiting are less frequent, which tends to reduce the number of intraocular complications. Bleeding is less troublesome, and secretions are better controlled. Fewer cardiac and pulmonary complications occur with local anesthesia. Meperidine hydrochloride (Demerol(R)) and pentobarbital sodium (nembutal) remain drugs of choice in preoperative medication. Lidocaine (Xylocaine(R)), 1 or 2 per cent, is a most satisfactory local anesthetic for intraocular operations. Complete akinesia of the eyelids has been achieved in every instance by a modified combination of the O'Brien and Van Lint techniques, using lidocaine 1 per cent. Nasolacrimal procedures can be performed satisfactorily by injecting the nasociliary and infraorbital nerves with lidocaine 2 per cent.  (+info)

(8/8) Trichlorethylene analgesia use for urologic procedures in the office.

Trichlorethylene inhalation for analgesia was used in 391 cases in which urologic procedures were carried out in the office. In the great majority of cases the patients had no significant pain or had only minor discomfort. Results were considered poor in less than 10 per cent of cases.  (+info)


How long after anesthesia is the stomach fully back to normal?


This morning I went in for a bit of anesthesia for a small procedure. I got out of this at about 1pm and it's 3:30pm now. The doctor said for a few hours, the stomach wouldn't be okay and to wait until your hungry. But I had planned on going out to eat soon, so how long would it take until my stomach fully recovered and I could eat pretty much anything again?
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You'll be fine.  The main issue with anesthesia is that it can cause nausea.  I'm guessing that the doctor told you to wait so that you wouldn't throw up if you hadn't cleared the anesthesia.  So go for it.  If you're hungry enough to eat, you'll be fine.


How long does it take anesthesia to wear off?


General anesthesia. How long does it take to wake up and how long before you are completely "with it". Does it take longer to wear off if you have a long operation vs a short one? I have  had surgery before ( 3x)-I just don't rememeber the first day after the operation.
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It depends on a lot of factors.

The length of the surgery plays a big role, because you're going to get more medication for a longer surgery than a short one.  The gases that we use to keep you asleep go quickly from lungs to blood to brain, where they do their thing.  They also leech slowly into fat and muscle.  If you have a short surgery, there isn't much time for that, but if you have a long surgery, there is.  Just as they go slowly into those tissues, they come out slowly, and you still have a little bit to get rid of.

The choice of drugs that the anesthesiologist uses also plays a part.  Some gases hang around longer than others, and we use about half a dozen other drugs as part of the anesthesia.  Some pain medications are long acting and can make you drowsy.

Patients have different sensitivities to the drugs we use, and that influences how they wake up.  Obese people tend to wake up more slowly, as they have more fat to store the gases, and tend to hang on to them longer.  There are other complications with anesthesia in the obese, but I'm not going into that here.

For some short operations, I can have patients wide awake in the operating room when the procedure is done.  For very long and invasive surgeries, I might keep them snowed overnight, sometimes on a ventilator.  Every case is different.


What anesthesia would you choose for a vitrectomy?


Does local anesthesia take away all pain? I am torn between general and local. I am freaking the f out about someone operating on my eyes and i dont know if i would start tossing and turning if i were awake!
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We do vitrectomies under general anesthesia.  The ophthalmologists are pretty firm about you not moving while they have instruments inside your eyeball.

General, endotracheal tube, paralysis.

A cataract is an entirely different operation that is usually done under local or a retrobulbar nerve block, with a little sedation.


What anesthesia is used for wisdom teeth removal?


I'm going to get my wisdom teeth out in the future, and I was wondering what type of anesthesia is used for that. I heard Versed isn't the best one to use, and that Propofol was common. Which one is used for a wisdom teeth extraction?
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Just a heads up,you may not want them to give you a drug called Versed ( Midazolam )

In fact, many people who use Versed for " IV Sedation,Conscious Sedation" during a procedure are awake for the entire procedure but remember nothing, often believing they were "out" the whole time.



Versed (Midazolam) is an amnestic. It is commonly administered in combination with anesthesia before and during surgery. It is also commonly used for minor procedures like colonoscopies dental procedures like extractions,conscience sedation,twilight sleep, so that patients won't remember pain and discomfort.HOWEVER THAT DOES NOT MEAN THAT THOSE SENSATIONS WILL NOT BE EXPERIENCED!!!!Forgetting does no mean it did not happen!! Amnesia does NOT take place for some patients.

IT'S NOT MY INTENTION FOR YOU TO NOT GET THE PROCEDURE DONE, JUST INFORMING YOU THAT YOU MAY WANT IT DONE WITH ANOTHER DRUG!!!!!

Here is a note from someone that did use versed

I know I was sedated, I don't remember anything.. but I know I was screaming, everyone could hear me.. My thing is how was I screaming if im knocked out.


What things should I be concerned of when going under anesthesia?


I've never been under anesthesia before and it makes me a little nervous. What are the risks? Is it possible to die from going under anesthesia? Are there any tests I could take before a surgery to make sure that my body can tolerate the anesthetics?
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There are risks with any anesthetic, but in general, the healthier you are when you come in, the lower your risk.  People with bad heart disease uncontrolled diabetes, lungs wrecked from smoking, and emergency cases are higher risk.  It's possible to die under anesthesia but very unlikely.  We get some really sick people through surgery.

If any pre-operative testing is required, your surgeon or the hospital will make sure that you get it done.  If you are healthy, no pre-operative testing may be required.  Sometimes we like to see blood work, EKG or x-rays, and if those are abnormal, further testing may be ordered.

Anesthesia today is very safe when administered by a qualified anesthesiologist.  


How often does anesthesia fail, when doctors bring patients into surgery?


A while ago, I saw a tv show how anesthesia, has failed before in the past.  Some people have gone had surgery, and the anesthesia didn't keep some patients asleep the entire surgery.  I saw this tv show, on the discovery health channel.  Is this common to happen, annd how often has it happen?
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It happens, but it's rare.

It's called awareness under anesthesia, and can happen if the patient is paralyzed but not adequately anesthetized.

Much more common is the situation where we sedate a patient, and they later complain that they were not asleep.  Old people having catarct surgery do this a lot.

"I wasn't asleep!"
"You weren't supposed to be asleep."
"Yeah, but I wasn't asleep!"
(Anesthesiologist bangs head on wall)

Awareness is most likely to happen during open heart surgery, emergency C-sections or trauma surgery.  In each of those situations, the amount of drug we can safely give is limited, and sometimes the surgery has to be started quickly to save lives.  (I always talk to my C-section general anesthesia patients, just in case, but haven't had anyone tell me they were awake yet)

It's not something to lose sleep over (pun intended).


What is the most common anesthesia used for wisdom teeth extraction?


Do they usually put you under general anesthesia? Can you request to just be locally numbed?
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I had all 4 extracted at once, using only local anesthesia. This can be combined with nitrous oxide to help lessen your anxiety. I think that being put completely under is really unnecessary unless you're completely terrified.


Is the anesthesia for wisdom teeth and gastroscopy the same?


I am having my wisdom teeth out and am worried that the anesthesia will make me sick.  I've had gastroscopies before and that wasn't a problem, but is it a different kind of anesthesia?
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Depends on who is giving the anesthesia.  Neither is commonly done with gas, but rather with IV meds.  Oral surgeons usually give their own anesthesia, and God only knows what they do.  (They have very limited training in anesthesia, and do not adhere to the same safety standards that anesthesiologists do)

There are medications and techniques that can reduce your chances of getting sick.  Ask (in advance) about a scopolomine patch, dexamethasone and ondansetron.  they tend to work well.