Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Competency-Based Education: Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.Cultural Competency: Cultural and linguistic competence is a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, agency, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. Competence implies the capacity to function effectively as an individual and an organization within the context of the cultural beliefs, behaviors, and needs presented by consumers and their communities.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Accreditation: Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Delphi Technique: An iterative questionnaire designed to measure consensus among individual responses. In the classic Delphi approach, there is no interaction between responder and interviewer.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Consensus: General agreement or collective opinion; the judgment arrived at by most of those concerned.Education, Nursing, Graduate: Those educational activities engaged in by holders of a bachelor's degree in nursing, which are primarily designed to prepare them for entrance into a specific field of nursing, and may lead to board certification or a more advanced degree.Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Health Educators: Professionals who plan, organize and direct health education programs for the individual, groups and the community.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Specialty Boards: Organizations which certify physicians and dentists as specialists in various fields of medical and dental practice.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Nurse Administrators: Nurses professionally qualified in administration.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Staff Development: The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Job Description: Statement of the position requirements, qualifications for the position, wage range, and any special conditions expected of the employee.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Licensure, Dental: The granting of a license to practice dentistry.Dentistry, Operative: That phase of clinical dentistry concerned with the restoration of parts of existing teeth that are defective through disease, trauma, or abnormal development, to the state of normal function, health, and esthetics, including preventive, diagnostic, biological, mechanical, and therapeutic techniques, as well as material and instrument science and application. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 2d ed, p237)Employee Performance Appraisal: The assessment of the functioning of an employee in relation to work.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Inservice Training: On the job training programs for personnel carried out within an institution or agency. It includes orientation programs.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Osteopathic Physicians: Licensed physicians trained in OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE. An osteopathic physician, also known as D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathy), is able to perform surgery and prescribe medications.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Physarida: An order of protozoa characterized by a peridium and capillitium that are calcareous and a spore mass that is usually dark-colored.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.United StatesEducation, Professional: Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.Education, Pharmacy, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform graduate pharmacists of recent advances in their particular field.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Schools, Pharmacy: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Certification: Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.International Educational Exchange: The exchange of students or professional personnel between countries done under the auspices of an organization for the purpose of further education.Physician Executives: Physicians who serve in a medical and administrative capacity as head of an organized medical staff and who also may serve as liaison for the medical staff with the administration and governing board.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Dentist-Patient Relations: The psychological relations between the dentist and patient.NebraskaInstitute of Medicine (U.S.): Identifies, for study and analysis, important issues and problems that relate to health and medicine. The Institute initiates and conducts studies of national policy and planning for health care and health-related education and research; it also responds to requests from the federal government and other agencies for studies and advice.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Patient Care: The services rendered by members of the health profession and non-professionals under their supervision.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Plagiarism: Passing off as one's own the work of another without credit.Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.