Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Vocational Guidance: Systematic efforts to assist individuals in selecting an occupation or suitable employment on the basis of aptitude, education, etc.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.General Surgery: A specialty in which manual or operative procedures are used in the treatment of disease, injuries, or deformities.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Alberta: A province of western Canada, lying between the provinces of British Columbia and Saskatchewan. Its capital is Edmonton. It was named in honor of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p26 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p12)Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.United StatesGreat BritainData Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Awards and Prizes